Netherlands Defence Staff Dr. C.J. Helsloot Language Coordinator [email protected] BILC Seminar...

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Transcript of Netherlands Defence Staff Dr. C.J. Helsloot Language Coordinator [email protected] BILC Seminar...

Slide 1The present status in The Netherlands
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Giacomo Leopardi, 1819
Language training is task-specific;
Language tests are available;
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There is a Language Policy document
accepted in 2007
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No Defence Language Institute
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Language Policy document (BR 8.03; 2007)
English is a basic military skill for (almost) all personnel
Development of a STANAG 6001 test for English
Registration of the languages known by all personnel
Analysis of the language needs within all Staff and Ops commands
Investing in languages other than English, e.g., French, Mandarin, Hindi, Russian, Arabic, Spanish
Use of language learning technologies
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past & present
70,000 employees
Staff 2,000
past & present
Which languages?
Officers
past & present
Which languages?
(non-individually taught)
Serbo-Croatian between 1998 and 2002
Pashto between 2007 and 2010
French since 2008
past & present
English Classes
Initial education
Officers Netherlands Defence Academy (NLDA): 80 hours (only first year, only 36 contact hours)
NCO’s Royal Military School (KMS): 22 hours
Secondary education
Medical personnel course
Air Force school: air traffic controller course, F16 technician course
Navy school
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past & present
French: 0,5
Russian: 1,5
Dutch: 1,5
past & present
Civilians
Privates/Corporals
Conclusion
At least 65% of employees of the Dutch military forces does not get any English language education.
Lessons Identified ISAF
at all ranks.
past & present
but throughout the Dutch society.
Who’s to blame?
Ministry of Education, Culture and Science (OCW)
Primary school
Since 1986: English is compulsory at primary schools from the age of 10 years.
Barcelona Convention 2002, 2 FLs at an early age.
In 2008, the Dutch Council of Education (Onderwijsraad) advised teaching English much earlier, from 4 or 6 years.
Although not yet compulsory, in 2010 about 200 primary schools have initiated Early Bird programmes.
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Secondary school
Pre-university school (VWO): 12-18
Lower vocational level (VMBO): 12-16
German or French
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NEW
an insufficient mark for English is not allowed,
almost insufficient, must be compensated
Content and Language Integrated Learning
Bilingual secondary schools (NLD-ENG)
20 lower vocational education
National agency, European Platform, in charge of the quality control
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NEW
Catching up
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present & future
introduced military curricula
Intermediate Vocational Education
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present & future
through blended-learning
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present & future
From 2011 at the Defence Institute of Intelligence and Security
Out-in-the-field English, guided by language experts and highly proficient military
content-based instructions
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Language Policy document (BR 8.03; 2007)
English is a basic military skill for (almost) all personnel
Development of a STANAG 6001 test for English
Registration of the languages known by all personnel
Inventory of the language needs within all Staff and Ops commands
Investing in languages other than English, e.g., French, Mandarin, Hindi, Russian, Arabic, Spanish
Use of new language learning technologies
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future
Defence Language Institute
future
How are they organised? What are their aims and objectives?
Are there models available regarding
planning & control?
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