NARRATIVES VS. NON-NARRATIVES Susan Ely Reading and Responding.

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Transcript of NARRATIVES VS. NON-NARRATIVES Susan Ely Reading and Responding.

  • Slide 1
  • NARRATIVES VS. NON-NARRATIVES Susan Ely Reading and Responding
  • Slide 2
  • NarrativesNon-Narratives Use storyline in chronological order (time order) The point is what the writer or character learned from what happened Heavy on description, setting, plot and character Easy to visualize Organized logically according to main ideas and details. Can use a variety of organizational patterns. The point is stated in the thesis statement (statement of purpose) Heavy on supporting reasons, evidence, research etc. Not so easy to visualize
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  • But.Sometimes we can use both A narrative used in a non-narrative piece for support Pg. 5, example 1.2 Introduction Body Conclusion supporting reason
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  • Why write narratives? Create shared history Entertain Spark curiosity Help us find meaning through real life events
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  • When used as support. Narratives add human interest Narratives provide insight Narratives draw us closer to the writer/storyteller But..
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  • Narratives used as support will most likely NOT be the main idea of the essay. Narrative I Event I I Non-Narrative I Support (cause/effect) I Support (compare) I Support (Narrative) I Support (Statistics/facts)
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  • So, whats the point in knowing if Im reading a narrative or not? You have a better idea of how to read the assignment (pg. 4) How is this true? You will know what to expect. So It helps you preview (mapping where the reading will take you) because you know narratives use different comprehension clues If you are reading a narrative, there are ways to help you remember what you read
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  • General Narrative Structure Rising Action (Tension) Falling Action ( Reflection ) Climactic Moment Introduction Background Setting Thesis Introduce Conflict C o n c l u s i o n
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  • General Narrative Structure Rising Action (Tension) Falling Action ( Reflection ) Climactic Moment Introduction -Background -Setting -Thesis -Introduce Conflict Conclusion Event #1 Event #2 Event #3 Event #4 Discussion and closing events Resolution, final impression or reference to the thesis
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  • My Response Journal to Fish Cheeks by Amy Tan Pre-reading: Think of a time when your parents, siblings or other close relatives put you into a social situation that made you feel very uncomfortable or embarrassed.
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  • My Response Journal to Fish Cheeks by Amy Tan Setting Characters Beginning Event (or problem) Plot (or action) Outcome Personal Thoughts (what did you learning from the story)?
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  • Thesis Statements in Narratives main idea = (topic + meaning of the story)
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  • 2 ways a narratives main idea might be incorporated Explicitdirectly articulates purpose of the story Implicitdoes not directly state the purpose. Starts right into story and lets the details/images reveal the thesis.
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  • Example TOPIC: playing college football Example Implicit Thesis Statement for narrative: starts right into story and lets the details/images reveal the thesis Example Explicit Thesis Statement for narrative: My experience playing college football taught me skills that will benefit me throughout the rest of my life.
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  • Narrative Characteristics Has an implied or explicit thesis Makes a point (reflection) Conveys action and detail Uses dialogue and description Works toward climactic moment Only includes details that develop tension and work toward climax
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  • Vocabulary
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  • Context (inference) People who worked with him were mickled by Rashids terrible job performance. A. disgusted B. delighted C. happy D. disowned
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  • Context (definition) The scientific experiment was not tortentous; even after performing the experiment repeatedly, Dr. Watson couldnt tell whether the medicine was safe. A. available B. timely C. unclear D. conclusive
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  • Context (contrast) Instead of actively job hunting, Sunil was soddile; he figured the right job would come to him.
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  • Basic dictionary definition structure: TermClassCharacteristics forkutensiltwo or more prongs A fork is a utensil that has two or more prongs.
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  • Basic dictionary definition structure: Term______Class__Characteristics happiness feeling/emotion pleasure or enjoyment because of your lifes situation Happiness is a feeling of pleasure or enjoyment because of your lifes situation.
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  • Basic dictionary definition structure: Term______Class_____Characteristics Leapto jump from a surface or over something Pounce to jump suddenly, going toward and take hold of something
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  • Vocabulary help Online Dictionaries like Webster: http://www.merriam-webster.com/ Quizlet: http://quizlet.com/
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  • Slide 25
  • -Round 2- Topic vs. Main Idea
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  • TOPIC Can be stated in a single word or phrase Not opinionated MAIN IDEA Stated in a complete sentence (in your own words) Expresses the writers opinion on the topic Also called _______
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  • -Round 3- Skim vs. Scan
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  • Finding Main Idea Scanning- Looking down and around a page quickly and efficiently searching to find specific information (word/phrases). Search for: Key words Facts or phrases
  • Slide 29
  • Finding Main Idea Skimming- Discovering main ideas by reading: 1 st and last paragraphs topic sentences paying attention to Titles bold type or italics photographs captions
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  • Skim vs. Scan SKIM To quickly find details/main ideas Do 3-4 times faster than normal reading Reading a lot in a short amount of time Good when deciding if something is worth your time SCAN Comes before skimming Does it have info. I m looking for? Certain words Certain phrases
  • Slide 31
  • New York Times http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/