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  • Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    Mental Health in Complex Emergencies (MHCE 12) Course Programme

    October 9-19, 2016 | Chteau de Bossey, Bogis-Bossey, Switzerland

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The Mental Health in Complex Emergencies course is an intensive multidisciplinary six-day training course for mental health workers and humanitarian program staff who wish to gain insight and competency in establishing mental health or psychosocial programs in (post) conflict areas or in complex disaster settings. The course will provide practical orientation and training to equip participants to establish and organize programs in mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) and strengthen adjunct applicable skills for use in complex humanitarian emergencies and relief situations, such as needs assessments, monitoring and evaluation, understanding the humanitarian context, security, and self-care. Through this course, students are exposed to both the most recent academic thought on mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) as well as the experiences of field practitioners in implementing MHPSS programming in complex emergencies. Students are sensitized to the non-material, social aspects of humanitarian assistance and will be able to take into account the psychosocial context when planning humanitarian assistance. This course emphasizes the well-being of the beneficiaries as considered in the 2007 'IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings' as endorsed by WHO, UNICEF, UNHCR, IFRC, and numerous local and international agencies working in the field of psychosocial assistance. STAFF LIST (Please refer to Page 11 for a list of faculty biographies)

    COURSE DIRECTORS:

    Larry Hollingworth, C.B.E. Humanitarian Programs Director, Center for International Humanitarian Cooperation (CIHC) Visiting Professor, Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA), Fordham University Lynne Jones, O.B.E. FRCPsych. Ph.D. Consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, Cornwall Partnership Foundation NHS Trust Visiting scientist, FXB Center for Health & Human Rights, Harvard University School of Public Health Peter Ventevogel, M.D. Senior Mental Health Officer, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

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  • 2 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    COURSE FACULTY:

    Maria Bray, M.A., Global Advisor for Child Protection, Mental Health & Psychosocial Support, Terre des hommes, Lausanne Mark Cousins Independent filmmaker and writer Wilma Doedens, M.D. Technical Advisor, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Geneva Scott Pohl, J.D. Senior Community-Based Protection Advisor, UNHCR, Geneva Andrew Rasmussen Ph.D. Associate Professor, Psychology, Fordham University, New York Director, MS in Applied Psychological Methods Janis Ridsdel, M.Sc. Protection Officer (Sexual and Gender-Based Violence / Children), UNHCR, Geneva Mark van Ommeren, Ph.D. Coordinator Mental Health in Emergencies, Department of Mental Health and Substance Dependence World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva Willem van de Put Director, HealthNet TPO, Amsterdam Lena Verdeli, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology and Education Director of the Global Mental Health Lab, Columbia University, New York Inka Weissbecker, Ph.D., M.P.H. Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Advisor, International Medical Corps (IMC), Washington D.C. COURSE APPLICATION AND REGISTRATION INQUIRIES:

    Ellen Bratina, International Programs Coordinator Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA), Fordham University Email: [email protected] COURSE ADMINISTRATION: Suzanne Arnold Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA), Fordham University Email: [email protected]

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  • 3 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    After the course students will have an increased understanding of mental health and psychosocial needs and interventions in complex emergencies. They will also have an overview of the important guidelines, key issues, and debates within the field. They will have been introduced to the key capacities required for establishing MHPSS services in the field and had a chance to critically reflect on their own role as a humanitarian actor.

    Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

    Describe the diversity of mental health and psychosocial issues in complex emergencies and the role of cultural and contextual factors influencing MHPSS problems;

    Work with the IASC guidelines on MHPSS in Emergency Settings and use the tools in these guidelines such as the multi-layered service pyramid;

    Be familiar with appropriate training materials and curricula for use in the field, such as the mhGAP Intervention Guide and the guide for Psychological First Aid (PFA);

    Describe the principles of assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of MHPSS problems in emergency contexts including familiarity with WHO/UNHCR MHPSS assessment tools;

    Define the various roles of mental health professionals, psychosocial professionals, and nonspecialized MHPSS workers in different emergency contexts;

    Outline the principles of establishing programs in the mental health and psychosocial domains;

    Critically assess the academic literature covering MHPSS interventions in complex emergencies, with a view to continued learning and professional development.

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS

    PRE-COURSE READINGS (sent out prior to course and also available on course Google Site)

    1. Jones L, Asare JB, El Masri M, Mohanraj A, Sherief H, van Ommeren M. Severe mental disorders in complex emergencies. Lancet. 2009; 374(9690): 654-61.

    2. Tol WA, Barbui C, Galappatti A, Silove D, Betancourt TS, Souza R, et al. Mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian settings: linking practice and research. Lancet. 2011; 378(9802): 1581-91.

    3. Ventevogel, P. Jordans, M.J., Reis, R. De Jong, J.T.V.M. (2013). Madness or sadness: Lay concepts of mental illness in four African communities. Conflict and Health, 7:3.

    4. Rehberg, K. (2014). Revisiting therapeutic governance: The politics of mental health and psychosocial programmes in humanitarian settings. Working paper 98. Oxford: Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford Department of International Development.

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  • 4 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    COURSE STRUCTURE

    The course will begin with an introduction to main concepts including a discussion about the contexts surrounding different emergency situations. Using the IASC guidelines for Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings as a framework for analysis, participants will evaluate the different roles of mental health and psychosocial professionals in humanitarian emergencies and discuss the different problems and contextual obstacles that may arise in various humanitarian crises. Participants will then examine the clinical issues including severe mental disorders, substance abuse, traumatic reactions, grief and loss and sexual and gender based violence. Through lectures, discussions, and case studies participants will learn how to set up mental health and psychosocial support programs in emergencies and how to monitor and evaluate these programs. Participants will then undertake a critical examination of the main aspects and challenges confronting humanitarianism and explore cross cultural issues, human rights, and conflict resolution. The course will conclude with a full day scenario exercise.

    Methods and tools used will include:

    Interactive presentations;

    Scenario exercises, group work, and discussions;

    Combination of theoretical foundation through lecture and practical application through case studies;

    Facilitation by experienced humanitarian aid workers, psychosocial and mental health professionals, and Fordham academic faculty.

    FORDHAM POLICIES AND EXPECTATIONS

    Students and faculty have a shared commitment to Fordham Universitys mission and values: http://www.fordham.edu/info/20057/about

    The course is regulated by the Fordham University discipline and grievance policies, available online at: https://www.fordham.edu/downloads/file/3247/gsas_policies_and_procedures_guidebook

    ASSESSMENT AND GRADING POLICY

    All participants are expected to uphold the following classroom requirements:

    1. Active participation in class and all group work assignments 2. On-time attendance of all sessions 3. Submission of original work

    Credit-earning participants who have registered as non-matriculated students and submitted the required paperwork and additional fee for credit will be assessed and given a letter grade for the course. Grades will be based on participation (15% of final grade), which includes presentations and other work done in class, and on an academic paper (85% of final grade). The academic paper must be submitted in order to receive full credit for the course.

    http://www.fordham.edu/info/20057/abouthttps://www.fordham.edu/downloads/file/3247/gsas_policies_and_procedures_guidebookhttp://www.fordham.edu/academics/colleges__graduate_s/graduate__profession/arts__sciences/forms__resources/policies_and_procedu/10_discipline_and_gr_73049.aspmailto:[email protected]://www.fordham.edu/downloads/file/3247/gsas_policies_and_procedures_guidebookwww.fordham.edu/iihawww.twitter.com/iiha_fordham

  • 5 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    COURSE SCHEDULE

    DAY 1: Sunday 9th October Welcome, Course Overview, Introduction to MHPSS

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    5:00 PM Registration

    5:30-6:30 PM Welcome and Introduction

    Outline of the Course: Purpose, Objectives, Structure, Administrative Briefing, Participant introductions

    Larry Hollingworth

    Peter Ventevogel

    Lynne Jones

    6:30-7:30 PM Mental health in complex emergencies

    What is it all about and why does it matter

    Development and testing low intensity psychological interventions in population in humanitarian settings

    Mark van Ommeren

    DAY 2: Monday 10th October Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems in Emergencies, Security

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    9:00-10:00 AM What is an emergency

    Setting the scene

    Peter Ventevogel

    Lynne Jones

    10:00-11:00 AM Humanitarian Crises and Case examples

    Experiences from various complex humanitarian emergencies

    Larry Hollingworth

    11:00-11:15 AM BREAK

    11:15 AM-12:30 PM Security

    How to stay safe in emergencies

    Larry Hollingworth

    12:30-1:30 PM LUNCH

    1:30-3:00 PM Setting up Mental Health and Psychosocial Programs in Emergencies: Part 1

    IASC guidelines (continued)

    Peter Ventevogel

    Inka Weissbecker

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  • 6 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    The (different) roles of mental health and psychosocial professionals in emergency contexts

    3:00-3:15 PM BREAK

    3:15 5:00 PM Setting up Mental Health and Psychosocial Programs in Emergencies: Part 2

    IASC guidelines (continued) The (different) roles of mental health

    and psychosocial professionals in emergency contexts

    Peter Ventevogel

    Inka Weissbecker

    DAY 2: Tuesday 11th October Community Based Interventions, Child protection, SGBV and PFA

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    8:30-10:15 AM Principles of Community Based Protection and its relevance for MHPSS

    Scott Pohl

    10:15-10:30 AM BREAK

    10:30 AM-12:00 PM Community Based Psychosocial Programming for Children and Adolescents in Humanitarian Settings

    Maria Bray

    12:00-1:00 PM LUNCH

    1:00-3:00 PM Sexual and Gender Based Violence Wilma Doedens

    3:00-3:15 PM BREAK

    3:15-5:00 PM PFA Inka Weissbecker

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  • 7 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    DAY 3: Wednesday 12th October Understanding the Clinical issues

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    8:30-10:30 AM Severe mental disorders and epilepsy Looking closely at some of the major mental health problems in the field, how they present and how they should be managed

    Severe mental disorders Epilepsy Substance abuse

    Peter Ventevogel

    10:30-10:45 AM BREAK

    10:45-11:30 AM Severe mental disorders and epilepsy (continued)

    Peter Ventevogel

    11:30 AM-12:30 PM Grief loss and depression Lynne Jones

    12:30-1:30 PM LUNCH

    1:30-3:00 PM Grief loss and depression (continued)

    Lynne Jones

    3:00-3:15 PM BREAK

    3:15-5:00 PM Stress related disorders

    Lynne Jones

    DAY 4: Thursday 13th October

    Needs Assessment, Monitoring and Evaluation

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    8:30-10:15 AM Case Management Inka Weissbecker

    10:15-10:30 AM BREAK

    10:45 AM-12:30 PM ECD in emergencies: an example of integrated programming

    Why MHPSS integration matters How to do it e.g. emergency nutrition

    and psychosocial needs

    Lynne Jones

    12:30-1:30 PM LUNCH

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  • 8 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

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    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    1:30-3:00 PM Assessment

    Why and how to do it Ethical issues Data collection Quantitative and qualitative

    approaches

    Andrew Rasmussen

    3:00-3:15 PM BREAK

    3:15-5:00 PM Monitoring and Evaluation

    How to establish comprehensive, appropriate, culturally-relevant and participatory systems of monitoring and evaluation?

    Lynne Jones

    Andrew Rasmussen

    DAY 5: Friday 14th October Critically Examining Humanitarianism, Cross Cultural Issues,

    Human Rights, Conflict Resolution

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    9:30-11:00 AM Taking Care of ourselves Lynne Jones

    Willem van de Put

    11:00-11:15 AM BREAK

    11:15 AM-12:30 PM Cross Cultural Issues, Human Rights, Conflict Resolution

    A critical exploration of individual, family and community based approaches and relations with indigenous healers

    Willem van de Put

    12:30-1:30 PM LUNCH

    1:30-3:00 PM Critically Examining Humanitarianism

    Who/What is a humanitarian? What is the humanitarian space?

    What is Community? What is our role faced with massive

    human rights abuses or genocide?

    Willem van de Put

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  • 9 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

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    What is/should be our relationship to the military?

    How do we move from relief to development?

    3:00-3:15 PM BREAK

    3:15-5:00 PM Discussion and Debate

    Topical issues chosen by participants

    Willem van de Put Discussants: Participants and Faculty

    DAY 6: Saturday 15th October Scenario Exercise, Course Evaluation, Certificate Ceremony

    TIME TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    8:30-10:15 AM Creative and innovative approaches:

    Participants share specific innovative project experiences

    Participants

    10:15-10:30 AM BREAK

    10:30-11:00 AM Introduction to Scenario Exercise Faculty

    11:00 AM-1:00 PM Scenario Exercise

    1:00-2:00 PM LUNCH

    2:00-3:15 PM Scenario Exercise presentations Faculty

    3:15-3:30 PM BREAK

    3:30-4:15 PM Scenario Presentations Faculty

    4:15-4:30 PM Certificates Faculty

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  • 10 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

    +1 212 636 6294 | [email protected] | fordham.edu/iiha | @iiha_fordham

    SUNDAY: FREE DAY

    WEEK 2: Module 2

    Monday 17, Tuesday 18, and Wednesday 19 October

    (Students should choose one course. All students are invited to the Guest lecture.)

    Course 1 TOPIC/ ACTIVITY FACILITATOR

    17-19 October

    Group Interpersonal Therapy for humanitarian settings

    Lena Verdeli

    Course 2 TOPIC/ ACTIVITY FACILITATOR

    17-19 October

    Child Focussed programming

    Lynne Jones, Mark Cousins and Janis Ridsdel

    TOPIC/ ACTIVITY LECTURER

    18 October

    TBC

    7:30-9:00 PM

    Special Guest lecture:

    Topic to be announced

    Guest from ICRC

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  • 11 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

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    Faculty biographies

    Maria Bray, M.A., is a cross cultural psychologist with master's certificates in medical psychology, neuropsychology and ethnology. For eight years she worked as psychosocial project coordinator in several humanitarian settings including Afghanistan, Sudan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Georgia. Since 2010, she is the Global Advisor for Child Protection, Mental Health & Psychosocial Support for Terre des hommes (Tdh), an international child protection organisation based in Lausanne (Switzerland). In this role, she provides technical support to child protection and community psychosocial projects developed in emergency and in development contexts, in the areas of assessment, programme design, project implementation, and evaluation of programmes. The psychosocial activities of Terre des hommes focus on community-based and non-specialised MHPSS interventions for children. Maria has also been involved in the development of the Movement Games and Sport methodology for Tdh, in order to support child psychosocial well-being and mitigate the impact of humanitarian crisis. Mark Cousins is a filmmaker and writer. His The First Movie, about Kurdish Iraqi children making films, won the Prix Italia. His A Story of Children and Film, a look at how young people have been portrayed in cinema, premiered at the Cannes film festival. He co-established the first Sarajevo film festival, during that city's siege. His work explores the role that imagination plays in recovery. He is an Honorary Professor of Film at the University of Glasgow. Wilma Doedens, M.D., is a medical doctor with a background in public health and reproductive health. She is the Technical Adviser on Reproductive Health in Emergencies of the Humanitarian and Fragile Contexts Branch of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), based in Geneva. Prior to joining UNFPA in 2002 she worked with World Health Organisation (WHO). She has extensive field experience in coordinating and implementing reproductive health services in both humanitarian and development settings, working within national health systems, as well as with NGOs such as Mdecins Sans Frontires (MSF) and the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC). In 2014 and 2015 she coordinated the academic seminar on Sexual Violence in Conflict at the Geneva Centre for Education and Research in Humanitarian Action. Larry Hollingworth, C.B.E., is the Humanitarian Programs Director for the Center for International Humanitarian Cooperation (CIHC) and a visiting Professor of Humanitarian Studies at the Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA) at Fordham University. Over the past few years he has served as Humanitarian Coordinator on CIHC sponsored missions for the United Nations in Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine, and Pakistan. After serving as a British Army officer for thirty years, Larry joined UNHCR, the UN refugee agency, and held assignments in Sudan, Ethiopia, and Eritrea. He was appointed Chief of Operations of UNHCR in Sarajevo, during the siege of the city in the Balkan conflict. He is a frequent lecturer on relief and refugee topics in universities and is a commentator on humanitarian issues for the BBC.

    Lynne Jones, OBE, FRCPsych., Ph.D., is a child psychiatrist, relief worker, writer, and experienced trainer. She has spent much of the last 20 years establishing and running mental health programs in areas of conflict or natural disaster including the Balkans, East and West Africa, South East Asia, the Middle East, Central America, Haiti, and most recently the Philippines. Her most recent book is Then They Started Shooting: Children of the Bosnian War and the Adults they Become (Bellevue Literary Press, 2012). Jones has an MA in human sciences from the University of Oxford. She qualified in medicine before specializing in psychiatry and has a PhD in social psychology and political science. In 2001, she was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for her work in child psychiatry in conflict-affected areas of Central Europe. She regularly consults for UNICEF and WHO. She is an honorary consultant at the Maudsley Hospital, London, and a visiting scientist at the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud Centre for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University. She is currently a part time Consultant in child and adolescent mental health for the Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. Scott Pohl, J.D., is the Senior Community-Based Protection Advisor at the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). He strives to strengthen UNHCRs capacity to ensure that its protection and humanitarian assistance programmes effectively respond to the needs, and build on the resources, of the communities that UNHCR serves. Scott has been with UNHCR in various protection capacities since 2002, including emergency and

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  • 12 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

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    protracted settings in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. Scott has continuously worked to advance an inclusive and participatory approach within UNHCR, ensuring regular consultation with refugees and internally displaced persons from all age, gender and diversity groups. During the conflict in the North of Sri Lanka, he coordinated UNHCRs protection response, collaborating with displaced communities, humanitarian actions and local authorities to strengthen the delivery of protection and assistance. Scott Pohl is a graduate of Syracuse University (B.S., 1995) and George Washington University Law School (J.D., 2001). Andrew Rasmussen, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the MS program in Applied Psychological Methods at Fordham University. His academic work focuses on psychosocial assessment and care for displaced populations across multiple stages of migration. His academic work focuses on culture, stress and trauma; mental health services research; and community structures that impact service delivery. In addition to his academic work, Andrew has evaluated psychosocial programs for USAID, conducted forensic assessments for US Immigration Court cases, and provided care to survivors of political violence from around the world. Janis Ridsdel, MSc, has a degree in Forced Migration from Oxford University. She has a broad international humanitarian work experience covering over 20 emergencies worldwide, including refugee and other displacement situations. Her main technical skills are in child protection, with a focus on psychosocial support, separated and unaccompanied children, case management, and community-based child protection. She has worked with UNHCR in Geneva with frequent travel to refugee operations since 2014 and is involved in interagency work for child protection and SGBV, including the Child Protection Working Group. Before joining UNHCR she worked with international NGOS Plan International and Save the Children. Willem van de Put studied history, philosophy, and cultural anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. He specialized in medical anthropology, with an interest in collective trauma and health systems rehabilitation. After field assignments as a medical anthropologist in Nicaragua, Uganda and Cambodia, he became a staff member of the medical department of Mdecins sans Frontires (MSF-Holland) responsible for applied medical anthropology and mental health and psychosocial intervention models in the organization. In 1994 he became program director for the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization (TPO), building up a community mental health program throughout Cambodia. In 1997-1998 he was visiting professor in Medical Anthropology at the University of Phnom Penh. Since 1998 Willem is director of HealthNet TPO, an independent non-governmental organization aiming to build healthy communities and the re-establishment of health care in situations of chronic conflict and post-war development. HealthNet TPO is focusing on developing a new model that aims to integrate lessons learned from 20 years of MHPSS: Community Resource Mapping and Mobilization. Mark van Ommeren, Ph.D., is focal point for mental health and psychosocial support in emergencies in WHO headquarters. This job includes advising and supporting governments, NGOs, WHO Offices and other UN organizations in provision of the best possible social and mental health supports to people affected by emergencies. He has played a key role in drafting a range mental health and psychosocial normative documents currently used in disasters, including IASC Guidelines, Sphere standards, WHO position statements, WHO mhGAP evidence-based guidelines and clinical protocols as well as a range of assessment tools. He publishes regularly in leading public health journals. He has a particular interest in early recovery, i.e. initiating the development of long-term, sustainable services at the time of emergencies. Peter Ventevogel, M.D., is a psychiatrist and a medical anthropologist. Since October of 2013 he is the Senior Mental Health Officer with UNHCR, the refugee agency of the United Nations. From 2008-2013 he was the editor in-chief of Intervention, Journal for Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Conflict Affected Areas, published by the War Trauma Foundation. He worked with the NGO HealthNet TPO in mental health projects in Afghanistan (2002 2005) and Burundi (2005-2008) and as their Technical Advisor Mental Health in the head office in Amsterdam (2008-2011). In 2011 and 2012 he also worked as psychiatrist with Arq Foundation, the national trauma expert centre in the Netherlands. Peter regularly did consultancies for the World Health Organization and the UNHCR in Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Pakistan, Sudan and Syria. He has been course director of several academic short courses such as the course

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    Culture, Psychology and Psychiatry (Amsterdam Masters of Medical Anthropology), and the Practice Oriented Course Mental Health & Psychosocial Support in Post Conflict Setting (HealthNet TPO, the Netherlands).

    Helena (Lena) Verdeli, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychology and Education and Director of the Global Mental Health Lab at the Teachers College, Columbia University. As a clinical psychologist and researcher she is involved in randomized controlled trials of psychotherapy for depressed people across a variety of cultures and contexts. Lena has collaborated with academic and humanitarian groups in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Africa in the contextual modification of Interpersonal Psychotherapy for use in resource-poor communities: depressed adults in South Uganda, depressed adolescents in refugee camps in North Uganda (many of whom were child soldiers), distressed patients in primary care in Goa, India, displaced women in Colombia, and depressed persons in Haiti, among others.

    Inka Weissbecker, Ph.D., M.P.H. is the Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Advisor for the International Medical Corps (IMC). In this role, she provides remote and on-site technical oversight and support to IMC project countries in the areas of assessment, program design, project implementation, and evaluation of mental health and psychosocial programs. She has completed field assignments in South Sudan, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, Libya, Jordan, Lebanon, Gaza, Turkey, Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Japan. Inka has been a contributor to several and global IASC and WHO guidelines and working groups. She has also served as an NGO representative of the International Union of Psychological Science to the United Nations (ECOSOC and DPI). Her academic credentials include a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology specializing in health and public sector psychology from the University of Louisville and University of South Florida as well as an MPH in Global Health and Population Studies from the Harvard School of Public Health.

    For more information please contact:

    Peter Ventevogel at [email protected]

    Lynne Jones at [email protected]

    Ellen Bratina, IIHA International Programs Coordinator at [email protected]

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  • 14 Joseph A. Martino Hall | Fordham University | 45 Columbus Avenue, 3rd Floor | New York, NY 10023

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    Accommodation: Chteau de Bossey is offering the preferential rate of CHF 110 per night to all course participants. This rate includes room, all meals and coffee breaks. After acceptance, each course participant will be responsible for arranging a room reservation at Bossey and for settling the accommodation fees directly with Bossey.

    Specialist workshop fee for previous MHCE alumni: People who have done the MHCE basic course in the past can apply separately for the three-day workshops on 17-19 October. The tuition fee for the workshops only is USD 800.

    Scholarships: The Center for International Humanitarian Cooperation (CIHC), partner organization of the IIHA, offers a limited number of scholarships for tuition fees. Only citizens of developing nations who are currently working within the humanitarian field are eligible.

    Applications: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Those interested in attending this program should contact the International Programs Coordinator, Ellen Bratina at [email protected] for further instructions.

    Deadlines: A USD 500 deposit will be due immediately upon acceptance and the remaining tuition will be due three weeks prior to the start of the course.

    About the organizers:

    The Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA) was created at Fordham University in December 2001 to forge partnerships with relief organizations, offer rigorous academic and training courses at the graduate and undergraduate level, host symposia, and publish books relating to humanitarian affairs. Recognizing the need for a universally accepted basic standard of training for all humanitarian workers, the IIHA holds numerous training courses to accommodate the needs and schedules of humanitarian aid workers around the world. Website: www.fordham.edu/iiha

    The Center for International Humanitarian Cooperation (CIHC) was founded in 1992 to promote healing and peace in countries shattered by war, regional conflicts and ethnic violence. Website: www.cihc.org

    HealthNet TPO is a Dutch aid agency that works on health and well-being in areas disrupted by war or disasters. By working together with local communities we use health as a means to bring people together and to restore mutual trust. Website: www.healthnettpo.org

    International Medical Corps (IMC) is a global, humanitarian, non-profit organization dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through health care training and relief and development programs in over 30 countries. Mental health and psychosocial support services and activities are a cornerstone of our integrated and comprehensive programming. Website: www.internationalmedicalcorps.org and https://internationalmedicalcorps.org/programs/mental-health

    UNHCR is the United Nations Refugee Agency, mandated to lead and coordinate international action to protect refugees and resolve refugee problems worldwide. In 2013 UNHCR published the Operational Guidance for MHPSS Programming in Refugee Operations that formally recognizes the importance of MHPSS as an integral part of its mandate. Website: www.unhcr.org

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