Mastery in Mainstream schools SEND children: Principles ... 6.36 Teachers are responsible and...

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  • Mastery in Mainstream schools

    SEND children: Principles

    & practices

    29th September 2017

    Emma Patman

    Twitter: @epatman

    emma.patman@ncetm.org.uk

  • Let’s look at some maths!

    From www.nrich.org.uk

    KS1 Task

    Discuss:

    How would you modify

    the activity for it for a

    child you know

    with SEND?

    http://www.nrich.org.uk/

  • Defining SEND..

    • Impossible to define all children and all

    of their needs.

  • SEN Code of Practice 2014

    (updated 2015)

    6.12 All pupils should have access to a broad and balanced curriculum. The

    National Curriculum Inclusion Statement states that teachers should set

    high expectations for every pupil, whatever their prior attainment.

    Teachers should use appropriate assessment to set targets which are

    deliberately ambitious. Potential areas of difficulty should be identified

    and addressed at the outset. Lessons should be planned to address

    potential areas of difficulty and to remove barriers to pupil achievement.

    In many cases, such planning will mean that pupils with SEN and

    disabilities will be able to study the full national curriculum

  • A pupil has SEN where their learning difficulty or

    disability calls for special educational provision,

    namely provision different from or additional to that

    normally available to pupils of the same age. Making

    higher quality teaching normally available to the whole

    class is likely to mean that fewer pupils will require

    such support. Such improvements in whole-class

    provision tend to be more cost effective and

    sustainable.

  • 6.36 Teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and

    development of the pupils in their class, including where pupils access

    support from teaching assistants or specialist staff.

    6.37 High quality teaching, differentiated for individual pupils, is the first

    step in responding to pupils who have or may have SEN. Additional

    intervention and support cannot compensate for a lack of good

    quality teaching. Schools should regularly and carefully review the

    quality of teaching for all pupils, including those at risk of

    underachievement. This includes reviewing and, where necessary,

    improving, teachers’ understanding of strategies to identify and support

    vulnerable pupils and their knowledge of the SEN most frequently

    encountered.

  • 3 types of mathematical knowledge

    Factual – I know that…..

    Procedural – I know how

    Conceptual – I know why.. and I know

    these are related so I can use this……

  • Factual knowledge

    • Requires memory skills

    • The automatic retrieval of basic maths

    facts is important to solving

    mathematical problems

    • If facts cannot be recalled, this requires

    an extra level of calculation in more

    complex problems

    Can you share some good examples of

    how we can overcome this when working

    with children who have difficulty with this?

  • Procedural knowledge

    • Some argue that when we learn a

    method, we don’t need to understand

    • But if depth and application are to be

    achieved, at any level, we need a

    balance of procedural and conceptual

    knowledge

    • Can you share some good examples of how

    we can overcome this when working with

    children who have difficulty with this?

  • Conceptual knowledge

    • Often the most difficult to acquire

    because it involves building on other

    concepts

    • Lack of conceptual understanding leads

    to misconceptions and being unable to

    apply in other situations

    • Can you share some good examples of

    how we can overcome this when

    working with children who have difficulty

    with this?

  • Pause for thought …

    Discuss!

    With thanks to Jane Jones HMI

    Which of these additions is likely to cause some children the most cognitive

    Overload?

  • • Number Facts

    • Table Facts

    • Making Connections

    • Procedural

    • Conceptual

    • Making Connections

    • Chains of Reasoning

    • Making Connections

    • Access

    • Pattern

    • Making Connections

    Representation

    & Structure

    Mathematical Thinking

    FluencyVariation

    Coherence

    Teaching for Mastery: The 5 Big Ideas

    Small steps are easier to take

  • Your professional judgement

    • High expectations for all

    • What are you doing to help children

    keep up with their peers?

    • How can you remove barriers to

    learning?

    • What mindsets might need shifting?

  • A possible model……

    • All learners begin lesson together

    • Children work in pairs or small groups

    with children who are more / less

    confident

    • Children who need it are provided with

    scaffolds

    • Teaching assistant more general role

    • Adults decide IF/ WHEN a child needs

    to move to more personalised learning

  • Intervention

    • If intervention is needed, ideally it would

    be with the teacher

    • Could be pre-teaching

    • Could be within the lesson / practice

    time with another adult supervising the

    rest of the children

    • Could be after the lesson – as soon as

    possible and should be the same day

  • Case studies from schools

    Are gaps in knowledge

    because of SEN or another

    reason?

    SEN does not always

    mean lower attaining

  • The Role of Teaching Assistants

  • Pupil progress shouldn’t be confused

    with curriculum pace: good progress

    in mathematics is not about moving

    on quickly

    Vanessa Pittard , May 2017

  • Benefits • True inclusion

    • No pre-conceptions of how they will

    respond

    • Higher self esteem

    • Two way respect & role models

    • Learning from each other

    • Small steps beneficial

    • Repetition helpful

    • Time to practice, deepen

  • 1. We ALL start the journey

    TOGETHER

    2. Some children will need a little additional

    support along the way

    3. Some children, who feel confident, will be let loose. They’ll be able to

    explore deeper into the woods, before returning to the group to

    continue on with the journey.

    4. Children will not be racing off

    ahead on a different journey.

    5. Children will not be left behind alone and isolated.

    Maths

    Hunt

    Please remember……