Making Sense of the Mathematics Standards

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Making Sense of the Mathematics Standards

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Making Sense of the Mathematics Standards. Overview: Key messages and introduction to the Mathematics Standards. Assessment and Overall Teacher Judgement (OTJ). Evidence. Mathematics Standards Key Messages: - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Making Sense of the Mathematics Standards

Page 1: Making Sense of the  Mathematics Standards

Making Sense of the Mathematics Standards

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Overview:• Key messages and introduction to the

Mathematics Standards.

• Assessment and Overall Teacher

Judgement (OTJ).

• Evidence

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Mathematics Standards Key Messages:

• The purpose of the Mathematics Standards is to promote quality teaching and learning in every New Zealand classroom and success for all students (Page 6 Mathematics Standards).

• A continuation of numeracy PD, not new, part of the next phase.

• Effective teaching and learning is the key.

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“To be numerate is to have the ability and inclination to use mathematics effectively – at home, at work and in the community.”

(back cover page of NDP books)

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Feedback from the consultation:

1. Dimensions not liked or understood.Decision: changed to strand organisation which is much clearly linked and aligned to NZC.

2. Level of standards set too high, particularly at Year 7 and 8 level.Decision: The level of the standards will remain the same. They align directly to the levels in The New Zealand Curriculum.

3. The focus on number seems to have gone.Decision: The focus on number remains. The articulation of this has been strengthened with statements and diagrams included in

the standards.

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Assessment Key Messages (page 12)

• When assessing a student’s achievement and progress, the teacher needs to make an overall teacher judgement (OTJ) about the student in relation to the whole standard (paragraph 1).

• A strong understanding of Number is vital …..the expectations for Number are the most critical requirement for meeting a standard” (paragraph 5).

• …independently and most of the time (paragraph 4).

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Making an OTJ

Making an OTJ

Marginal/Uncertain

OVERALL TEACHER JUDGEMENT

Clearcut

Make a judgement

Involve the student

Evidence from multiple sources and cross-curricula-this may include standardised tool

What is involved in this?

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Definitions of achievement

Above: A student’s current level of achievement maps more closely to a standard above that year's standard.

At: A student is currently meeting the standard.

Below: A student is not currently meeting the standard and maps more closely to the preceding year's standard,

Well below: A student’s current achievement against the standard is such that it maps more closely to a standard more than one year below

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Making an overall teacher judgement (OTJ) in relation to the Mathematics Standards.

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1 2 3

After 1 year

After 2 years

After 3 years

End of Y4

End of Y5

End of Y6

2 3

4 5 6

Curriculum levels

Mathematics Standards

Numeracy Strategy Stages

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Alignment of Tools

• Alignment of Tools website

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Assessment judgements, from a range of sources, for each part of the mathematics and statistics curriculum are mapped onto a copy of the Mathematics Standards Poster for one of your students.

What standard is the best fit for this student?

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Student B

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Student C

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Each teacher from a team/syndicate

brings evidence of one of

those students

Select the children whose evidence is conflicting

The team selects one student that they

have come to an Agreement on and

check this with other levels

- vertical alignment

Using evidence, the National Standards

and other exemplars/benchmarks etc come to an agreed judgement

An example of a moderation process

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SPS Mathematic sources of

Evidence

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Sources of evidence to support decision-making

Observation of ProcessEvidence gained from informal assessment opportunities:

Learning ConversationsEvidence arising from Learning Conversations:

Test OutcomesEvidence gained from assessment tools, including standardised tools:

• Focussed Classroom Observation• Student books and tasks• GLoSS• NumPA• Student peer assessment

• Conferencing• Interviewing• Questioning• Explaining• Discussing

• PAT• e-asTTle/AsTTle V4• IKAN• GLoSS• NumPA

Overall Teacher

Judgement

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The Healthy Pyramid PracticeClassroom Assessment Information Source

Use Little

Use Some

Use Lots

For STRENGTH of information, use multiple samplings from multiple sources. NZEI Te Riu Roa and Lester Flockton, 2009.

Aligned to learning goals

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Mathematics OTJ tracker