MAG Yr5 5.2.37 H H Red% HH T Red% HT% T H Red% T%H T Red% TT % % Orange% % H H Orange% HH T Orange%

download MAG Yr5 5.2.37 H H Red% HH T Red% HT% T H Red% T%H T Red% TT % % Orange% % H H Orange% HH T Orange%

of 3

  • date post

    11-Jul-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of MAG Yr5 5.2.37 H H Red% HH T Red% HT% T H Red% T%H T Red% TT % % Orange% % H H Orange% HH T Orange%

  • Australian  Curriculum  Year  5   •  Apply  the  enlargement  transforma1on  to  familiar  two  dimensional  shapes  and  explore  the  proper1es  of  the  

    resul1ng  image  compared  with  the  original  (ACMMG115)   •  Recognise  that  probabili1es  range  from  0  to  1  (ACMSP117)   •  Pose  ques1ons  and  collect  categorical  or  numerical  data  by  observa1on  or  survey  (ACMSP118)     Key  Ideas     General  Capabili8es   u  Using  spa)al  reasoning     This  element  involves  students  in  making  sense  of  the  space  around  them.  Learners  visualise,  iden1fy  and  sort   shapes  and  objects,  describing  their  key  features  in  the  environment.     u  Cri1cal  and  crea1ve  thinking   Inquiring–iden1fying,  exploring  and  organising  informa1on  and  ideas-­‐Organise  and  process  informa1on   Reflec1ng  on  thinking  and  processes-­‐Transfer  knowledge  into  new  contexts.  Reflect  on  processes     Resources   •  FISH     •  Photos  of  Erik  Johansson   www.adobe.com/inspire/2013/02/interview-­‐erik-­‐johansson.html   •  Student  landscape  artwork   •  Spinners    

    Vocabulary   Certain,  uncertain,  possible,  impossible,  unlikely,  likely,  fantasy,  serendipity,  real,  predic1ng,  evidence,   survey,      

                 Ac8vity  Process:  Spinner   Learning  Inten1on.  To  iden1fy  the  shape  of  a  spinner  and  consider  why  a  circular  form  is  efficient.   Ask  learners  to  demonstrate  spinning  body  kinesthe1c-­‐circular  movement,  a  rota1on.  Ask  learners  to   describe  how  many  degree  this  involves  in  a  full  rota1on.      

    Spinning  can  be  controlled  or  random  depending  on     what  Is  being  rotated-­‐force  and  speed  are  factors.  

    Ask  learners  to  create  a  circular  spinner-­‐   usually  this  will  be  a  simple  circle.     Divide  the  class  cohort  into  groups    

    and  assign  a  spinner  problem      

    to  each  group.   Underline  the  probability  clue  words    

    Group  1   Wendy  wants  to  make  a  spinner  for  a  game  that  will  be   equally  likely  to  land  on  A,  B  or  C.  Divide  and  label  a  blank   spinner  so  that  it  will  work  for  Wendy’s  game.    

    Group  2   Elizabeth  wants  to  make  a  spinner  for  a  game  that  will  be   twice  as  likely  to  land  on  A  or  B.  Divide  and  label  a  blank   spinner  so  that  it  will  work  for  Elizabeth’s  game     Group  3   John  is  making  a  game  that  needs  a  spinner.  The  spinner   must  be  divided  into  four  parts:  A  B,  C  and  D.  John  wants  to   make  it  more  likely    that  it  will  land  on  B  than  on  C.  He  also   wants  to  make  sure  that  leber  D  is  the  least  likely  to  land   on.  Divide  and  label  a  blank  spinner  so  that  it  will  work  for   John’s  game.  

    Group  4   Maria  wants  to  make  a  spinner   for  a  game  that  will  be  likely  to   land  on  A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  F,  G  or  H.   Divide  and  a  blank  spinner  so   that  it  will  work  for  Maria’s   game.     Groups  report  on  the   reasonableness  of  their   solu1ons  using  the  FISH   process.    

  •  Group  5   Daniel  is  making  a  game  that  needs  a  spinner.  The  spinner  must   be  divided  into  five  parts:  A,  B,  C,  D  and  E.  Daniel  wants  to  make   it  more  likely  that  it  will  land  on  B  than  on  C  or  D.  He  also  wants   to  make  sure  that  the  leber  E  is  the  least  likely  to  land  on.   Divide  and  label  the  spinner  so  that  it  will  work  for  Daniel’s   game.     As  each  group  reaches  a  reasonable  solu1on  they  indicate  with   a  thumbs  up  presented  against  their  torso.                                  Ask  the  group  to  prepare  to  present  their                                ideas  to  the  class.    

    Ques1ons  to  be  considered   • Can  we  explain  how  we  solved  the  task?   • Can  we  show  evidence  which  supports  our  thinking  and   solu1on?   • How  do  we  know  that  our  solu1on  is  reasonable?    Groups  present  their  probability  clue  words  and  visual  solu1on   to  the  whole  class.    

    Ac8vity  Process:  Spinning  About     Key  Ques)ons  to  consider:   Is  the  world  real  or  imagined?   How  do  ar1sts  represent  their  world.  Ar1sts  are  free  to   interpret  reality  rather  than  reproduce  it.   ‘The  ar)st  does  not  draw  what  he  sees,  but  what  he  has  to  make   others  see’  (Edgar  Degas  (1834-­‐1917)  A  modern  ar1st  who   would  agree  with  this  viewpoint  is  Ton  Schulten.  He  is  a  Dutch   landscape  painter  who  uses  bright  blocks  of  colour  to  express   his  ideas  about  nature.     Watch  hbps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAnpIrS1WpE                        (in  Dutch,  but  ask  learners  to  read  sub1tles)   Ask  learners  to  watch  it  a  second  1me  the  ar1sts  statement    

    ‘I  translate  reality  in  my  own  way  which  makes  pain)ng  an   adventure’  

         

               

    Show  further  examples  of  his  work  and  discuss  what  they  see  in  his  work.  Slide  show  is  available   from    hbp://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-­‐resource/Ton-­‐Schulten-­‐Landscape-­‐ar1st-­‐6096489/    

    The  slideshow  can  then  be  adapted  to  include  a  perspec1ve  on  geometry  reasoning.        

                        Use  the  sentence  stem-­‐Ton  Schulten  uses………..     They  should  no)ce:   His  landscapes  are  semi-­‐abstract  (a  style  of  pain1ng,  in  which  the  subject  remains  recognizable   although  the  forms  are  highly  stylized).  There  is  a  strong  sense  of  visual  texture  about  his  work.    As  a  painter  he  uses  a  bright,  rich  colour  palebe  that  look  like  building  blocks  of  colour   intersec1ng  ver1cally  and  horizontally,  which  create  angles  which  are  olen  greater     than  90  degrees.  Link  to:  Year  5  Visual  ARTs  Unit-­‐Where  the  Sky  Meets  the  Sea    

    While  his  work  is  recognisably  a  landscape  it  would  be  impossible  to  see  this  view  looking  out  of  a   window  and  even  two  ar1st  would  not  see  it  in  the  same  way  in  it  en1rety.      

    In  collabora1ve  groups,  viewers  are  asked  to  label  the  colours  used  by  the  ar1st  in  his  landscape.   Descrip1ve  names  for  the  colours  are  to  be  encouraged.  Each  group  then  creates  a  spinner  based   on  the  colour  names  and  the  es1mated  amount  the  colour  is  represented  in  the  pain1ng.      

    Spinners  are  displayed  and  differences  discussed.  Groups  are  asked  to  discuss  whether  a  pain1ng   created  from