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  • 1.Introduction to Cosmology Barbara Ryden Department of Astronomy The Ohio State University January 13, 2006

2. Contents Prefacev1 Introduction12 Fundamental Observations 2.1 Dark night sky . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Isotropy and homogeneity . . . . 2.3 Redshift proportional to distance 2.4 Types of particles . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Cosmic microwave background . . 3 Newton Versus Einstein 3.1 Equivalence principle . . 3.2 Describing curvature . . 3.3 Robertson-Walker metric 3.4 Proper distance . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .7 7 11 15 22 28. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .32 33 39 44 474 Cosmic Dynamics 4.1 Friedmann equation . . . . . . . 4.2 Fluid and acceleration equations 4.3 Equations of state . . . . . . . . 4.4 Learning to love lambda . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .55 57 65 68 71. . . .79 79 86 91 94. . . .. . . .5 Single-Component Universes 5.1 Evolution of energy density 5.2 Curvature only . . . . . . . 5.3 Spatially at universes . . . 5.4 Matter only . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . ii. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . 3. iiiCONTENTS 5.5 5.6Radiation only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Lambda only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 976 Multiple-Component Universes 6.1 Matter + curvature . . . . . . 6.2 Matter + lambda . . . . . . . 6.3 Matter + curvature + lambda 6.4 Radiation + matter . . . . . . 6.5 Benchmark Model . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .7 Measuring Cosmological Parameters 7.1 A search for two numbers . . . . . 7.2 Luminosity distance . . . . . . . . . . 7.3 Angular-diameter distance . . . . . . 7.4 Standard candles & H0 . . . . . . . . 7.5 Standard candles & acceleration . . . 8 Dark Matter 8.1 Visible matter . . . . . . 8.2 Dark matter in galaxies . 8.3 Dark matter in clusters . 8.4 Gravitational lensing . . 8.5 Whats the matter? . . . 9 The 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .Cosmic Microwave Background Observing the CMB . . . . . . . . Recombination and decoupling . . . The physics of recombination . . . Temperature uctuations . . . . . . What causes the uctuations? . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .10 Nucleosynthesis & the Early Universe 10.1 Nuclear physics and cosmology . . . . 10.2 Neutrons and protons . . . . . . . . . . 10.3 Deuterium synthesis . . . . . . . . . . 10.4 Beyond deuterium . . . . . . . . . . . 10.5 Baryon antibaryon asymmetry . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .101 . 104 . 108 . 112 . 116 . 118. . . . .126 . 126 . 131 . 136 . 141 . 144. . . . .155 . 156 . 159 . 164 . 170 . 175. . . . .179 . 180 . 185 . 189 . 196 . 201. . . . .208 . 209 . 213 . 218 . 222 . 228 4. ivCONTENTS11 Ination & the Very Early 11.1 The atness problem . . 11.2 The horizon problem . . 11.3 The monopole problem . 11.4 The ination solution . . 11.5 The physics of ination . 12 The 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5Universe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Formation of Structure Gravitational instability . The Jeans length . . . . . Instability in an expanding The power spectrum . . . Hot versus cold . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . universe . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .233 . 234 . 236 . 238 . 242 . 247. . . . .255 . 258 . 261 . 266 . 272 . 276Epilogue284Annotated Bibliography286 5. Preface This book is based on my lecture notes for an upper-level undergraduate cosmology course at The Ohio State University. The students taking the course were primarily juniors and seniors majoring in physics and astronomy. In my lectures, I assumed that my students, having triumphantly survived freshman and sophomore physics, had a basic understanding of electrodynamics, statistical mechanics, classical dynamics, and quantum physics. As far as mathematics was concerned, I assumed that, like modern major generals, they were very good at integral and dierential calculus. Readers of this book are assumed to have a similar background in physics and mathematics. In particular, no prior knowledge of general relativity is assumed; the (relatively) small amounts of general relativity needed to understand basic cosmology are introduced as needed. Unfortunately, the National Bureau of Standards has not gotten around to establishing a standard notation for cosmological equations. It seems that every cosmology book has its own notation; this book is no exception. My main motivation was to make the notation as clear as possible for the cosmological novice. I hope that reading this book will inspire students to further explorations in cosmology. The annotated bibliography at the end of the text provides a selection of recommended cosmology books, at the popular, intermediate, and advanced levels. Many people (too many to name individually) helped in the making of this book; I thank them all. I owe particular thanks to the students who took my undergraduate cosmology course at Ohio State University. Their feedback (including nonverbal feedback such as frowns and snores during lectures) greatly improved the lecture notes on which this book is based. Adam Black and Nancy Gee, at Addison Wesley, made possible the great leap from rough lecture notes to polished book. The reviewers of the text, v 6. viPREFACEboth anonymous and onymous, pointed out many errors and omissions. I owe particular thanks to Gerald Newsom, whose careful reading of the entire manuscript improved it greatly. My greatest debt, however, is to Rick Pogge, who acted as my computer maven, graphics guru, and sanity check. (He was also a tireless hunter of creeping fox terrier clones.) As a small sign of my great gratitude, this book is dedicated to him. 7. Chapter 1 Introduction Cosmology is the study of the universe, or cosmos, regarded as a whole. Attempting to cover the study of the entire universe in a single volume may seem like a megalomaniacs dream. The universe, after all, is richly textured, with structures on a vast range of scales; planets orbit stars, stars are collected into galaxies, galaxies are gravitationally bound into clusters, and even clusters of galaxies are found within larger superclusters. Given the richness and complexity of the universe, the only way to condense its history into a single book is by a process of ruthless simplication. For much of this book, therefore, we will be considering the properties of an idealized, perfectly smooth, model universe. Only near the end of the book will we consider how relatively small objects, such as galaxies, clusters, and superclusters, are formed as the universe evolves. It is amusing to note, in this context, that the words cosmology and cosmetology come from the same Greek root: the word kosmos, meaning harmony or order. Just as cosmetologists try to make a human face more harmonious by smoothing over small blemishes such as pimples and wrinkles, cosmologists sometimes must smooth over small blemishes such as galaxies. A science which regards entire galaxies as being small objects might seem, at rst glance, very remote from the concerns of humanity. Nevertheless, cosmology deals with questions which are fundamental to the human condition. The questions which vex humanity are given in the title of a painting by Paul Gauguin (Figure 1.1): Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? Cosmology grapples with these questions by describing the past, explaining the present, and predicting the future of the universe. Cosmologists ask questions such as What is the universe made of? Is it nite or 1 8. 2CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTIONFigure 1.1: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? Paul Gauguin, 1897. [Museum of Fine Arts, Boston] innite in spatial extent? Did it have a beginning some time in the past? Will it come to an end some time in the future? Cosmology deals with distances that are very large, objects that are very big, and timescales that are very long. Cosmologists frequently nd that the standard SI units are not convenient for their purposes: the meter (m) is awkwardly short, the kilogram (kg) is awkwardly tiny, and the second (s) is awkwardly brief. Fortunately, we can adopt the units which have been developed by astronomers for dealing with large distances, masses, and times. One distance unit used by astronomers is the astronomical unit (AU), equal to the mean distance between the Earth and Sun; in metric units, 1 AU = 1.5 1011 m. Although the astronomical unit is a useful length scale within the Solar System, it is small compared to the distances between stars. To measure interstellar distances, it is useful to use the parsec (pc), equal to the distance at which 1 AU subtends an angle of 1 arcsecond; in metric units, 1 pc = 3.1 1016 m. For example, we are at a distance of 1.3 pc from Proxima Centauri (the Suns nearest neighbor among the stars) and 8500 pc from the center of our Galaxy. Although the parsec is a us