Indianapolis Colts 2009 Media Guide

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Transcript of Indianapolis Colts 2009 Media Guide

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2009 SEASON SCHEDULEPRESEASONDate Friday, August 14 Thursday, August 20 Saturday, August 29 Thursday, September 3 Sunday, September 13 Monday, September 21 Sunday, September 27 Sunday, October 4 Sunday, October 11 Sunday, October 18 Sunday, October 25 Sunday, November 1 Sunday, November 8 Sunday, November 15 Sunday, November 22* Sunday, November 29* Sunday, December 6* Sunday, December 13* Thursday, December 17 Sunday, December 27* Sunday, January 3* HOME GAMES All times local to Indianapolis *Kickoff time subject to change Opponent MINNESOTA VIKINGS PHILADELPHIA EAGLES at Detroit Lions at Cincinnati Bengals Time 7:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 1:00 8:30 8:20 1:00 8:20 1:00 1:00 1:00 8:20 1:00 1:00 1:00 1:00 8:20 4:15 1:00 p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.

REGULAR SEASONJACKSONVILLE JAGUARS at Miami Dolphins at Arizona Cardinals SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at Tennessee Titans OPEN DATE at St. Louis Rams SAN FRANCISCO 49ers HOUSTON TEXANS NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at Baltimore Ravens at Houston Texans TENNESSEE TITANS DENVER BRONCOS at Jacksonville Jaguars NEW YORK JETS at Buffalo Bills

Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188-193 Biographies: Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26-36 Assistant Coaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-25 Caldwell, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-10 Irsay, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Polian, Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Rookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138-146 Veteran Players . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-137 Championship Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234-236 Coaching History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Draft History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194-200 Free Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201 Hall of Fame Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181-182 History of the Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177-178 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183-187 League Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149 Overtime History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179

INDEX

Records: Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202 Individual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203-217 Playoffs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237-244 Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218-226 Results: Preseason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245-247 Regular Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-303 Review of 2008: Game Summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151-167 Statistics: Individual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168-170, 174-176 Top Performers/Seasonal Leaders . . . . . . .227-233 Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171-173 Rosters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147-148 Schedule: Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 NFL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .312-314 Series Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304-311 NFL Stadiums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137

The Colts logo and the name Indianapolis Colts are trademarks of the Indianapolis Colts, Inc.INDIANAPOLIS COLTS PO Box 535000 Indianapolis, IN 46253 (317) 297-2658Switchboard (317) 297-7000Ticket Office (317) 297-8971Fax (317) 388-0982PR Fax E-mail: [email protected] http://www.colts.comThe 2009 Media Guide was compiled by Craig Kelley, Justin Dickens, Vernon Cheek, Bob Lamey, Pamela Humphrey and Craig Hammel and is meant to serve as an information source for the media and NFL fans. Information contained herein was compiled by current and previous Colts Public Relations staffs. Editorial assistance, Terry Musolf, John (Utah) Turney, Joe Cronin, Joe Horrigan, Elias Sports Bureau. Printing by Sport Graphics. Layout by Justin Dickens, with assistance from Becky Smoot. Photographs by Don Larson and A.J. Macht and through the clubs archives. Cover image design by Sherard Allen.

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INDIANAPOLIS COLTS ADMINISTRATIONADMINISTRATION James Irsay ......................................Owner and CEO Bill Polian ....................................................President Carlie Irsay-Gordon ..............................Vice President Casey Irsay Foyt....................................Vice President Pete Ward ....................Senior Executive Vice President Dan Emerson ....................................General Counsel Dan Luther ........................................Special Counsel COACHING STAFF Jim Caldwell ..........................................Head Coach Clyde Christensen....Asst. Head Coach/Wide Receivers Larry Coyer ..............................Defensive Coordinator Richard Howell ............Asst. Strength and Conditioning Gene Huey ..........................................Running Backs Pete Metzelaars ..Offensive Quality Control/Asst. Off. Line Mike Murphy............................................Linebackers Rod Perry ....................Special Assistant to the Defense Frank Reich ..........................................Quarterbacks Ray Rychleski........................................Special Teams Bill Teerlinck ..................................Defensive Assistant John Teerlinck ......................................Defensive Line Ricky Thomas ............................................Tight Ends Jon Torine............................Strength and Conditioning Alan Williams ....................................Defensive Backs Jim Bob Cooter......................................Staff Assistant Jackie Cook ....................Assistant to the Head Coach FOOTBALL OPERATIONS Chris Polian ........Vice President of Football Operations Steve Champlin ........Director of Football Administration Tom Telesco ......................Director of Player Personnel Clyde Powers ..............Director of Pro Player Personnel Kevin Rogers ..............................................Pro Scout Todd Vasvari ............................Eastern Regional Scout Bob Ferguson ....Special Asst. to the Dir. of Player Personnel Mark Ellenz ..............................................Area Scout Bob Guarini ..............................................Area Scout Kevin Kelly................................................Area Scout Byron Lusby ..............................................Area Scout Jamie Moore ............................................Area Scout Matt Terpening ..........................................Area Scout J.W. Jordan ..................Salary Cap/Personnel Analyst Stefani Paul ..............Player Development Administrator Jon Shaw ........................................Scouting Assistant Andrew Berry ..................................Scouting Assistant Debbie Finn ......Asst. to the Director of Player PersonnelEQUIPMENT MEDICAL STAFF

Dave Hammer ............................Head Athletic Trainer Erin Barill ..............................Director of Rehabilitation Dave Walston ........................Assistant Athletic Trainer Bryant Baugh ........................Assistant Athletic Trainer Arthur C. Rettig ....................MD, Orthopedic Surgeon Gary Misamore ....................MD, Orthopedic Surgeon Tom Klootwyk ......................MD, Orthopedic Surgeon Doug Robertson ....................................MD, Physician Pat Kersey............................................MD, Physician Marcus McCray..............................Team Chiropractor FINANCE Kurt Humphrey ......................Vice President of Finance Stacy Johns ................................................Controller Mary Clugston..............Accounting/Insurance Assistant Tina McKnight ..................Accounting/Payroll Assistant Amber Hughes ..................................Staff Accountant PUBLIC RELATIONS Craig Kelley ..............Vice President of Public Relations Vernon Cheek ........Assistant Director of Public Relations Justin Dickens ..............................Manager of Publicity Pamela Humphrey..................Public Relations Assistant Bob Lamey ......................................Voice of the Colts TICKET OPERATIONS Larry Hall ..............Vice President of Ticket Operations/ Guest Services Bob Parenteau..................Director of Ticket Operations Jamil Stafford......Assistant Director of Ticket Operations Megan Oldham ......Customer Relationship Representative Amy Pike ..................Customer Relationship Representative Andy Schwartz ........Customer Relationship Representative INFORMATION SYSTEMS Ryan Fannin ........Director of Football Information Systems Joseph McCurdy ......................Network Administrator Dan Plumlee ............................Applications Developer MARKETING AND CORPORATE SALES Tom Zupancic ..................Senior Vice President of Sales and MarketingCORPORATE SALES

Jon Scott......................................Equipment Mike Mays ....................Assistant Equipment Sean Sullivan..................Assistant Equipment Brian Seabrooks..............Assistant EquipmentVIDEO

Manager Manager Manager Manager

Marty Heckscher ..................................Video Director John Starliper ..........................Assistant Video Director

Jay Souers..............Vice President of Sponsorship Sales Matt Godbout ................Director of Sponsorship Sales Jerry Harbin ..................Manager of Team Partnerships Brandon Baltz ......Sponsorship Sales Account Manager Brian Healey ........Sponsorship Sales Account Manager Ryan Lobsiger ......Sponsorship Sales Account Manager Pat Smith..............Sponsorship Sales Account Manager Mark Walpole ......Sponsorship Sales Account Manager Lindsay Catavolos........................Account Coordinator Stephanie Minix ..........................Account Coordinator Brandon Schlarb..........................Account Coordinator Jett Branham ..........Assistant to the Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing Susie Peters..........................Asst. to the Vice President of Sponsorship Sales

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MARKETING/COMMUNITY RELATIONS

PREMIUM SEATING AND TICKET SALES

Chuck OHara............................Director of Marketing Joe Fonderoli ................................Marketing Assistant Matt Gonso ............................Manager of Promotions Ashley Williams............................Promotions Assistant Stephanie Mathes ......Community Relations Coordinator Joyce Bell ............Community Relations/Donations Asst. Sherard Allen ................New Media Graphic Designer Mike Prior........................Youth Football Commissioner Trey Mock ......................Mascot Program Coordinator Kat Taylor ............................Mascot Program Assistant Theresa Pottratz ....................Cheerleader Coordinator Josh Bleill ..................................................ConsultantCOLTS.COM

Greg Hylton ............Vice President of Premium Seating and Ticket Sales Kip Brownfield..........................Director of Ticket Sales Brad Beery ............Premium Seating Account Manager Kevin Kirkhoff ................Ticket Sales Account Manager Trang Truong......Premium Seating Services Coordinator FRONT OFFICE Cathy Catellier............Executive Assistant to the Owner Scott Gorman ................................Executive Assistant Sue Kelly ..............................Assistant to the President Traci Morgan........Asst. to the Senior Executive Vice President Carol Ballinger......Receptionist/Administrative Assistant Mark Feeser ............................Administrative Assistant Heidi Klene ......................................Travel Consultant Doug Melton ......................................Office Assistant FACILITIES Dave Atkins ..........................Director of Physical Plant Scott Davis ......................................Pavilion Manager Troy Glendenning ..........................Facilities Manager Joe Atkins ........................Assistant Facilities Manager Eric Boiling ........................Building/Grounds Assistant Ruben Hernandez ..............Building/Grounds Assistant Angel Soto ........................Building/Grounds Assistant Danny Thompson................Building/Grounds Assistant

A.J. Macht ........................Director of Internet Services Daron Williams................Internet Services CoordinatorPRODUCTION

Brian Woodrum..........................Director of Production Jeffrey Gorman ............Manager of Broadcast Services Vince Eagan ......................Manager, Radio Production Adam Good ..........................Multimedia Coordinator Chris Buckley ......................................Video Engineer Jay Fitzwater ..........................Editor, Video Production Derek Wolfe............Broadcast Video Graphic Designer

LUCAS OIL STADIUM FACTS

Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63,000 Square feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.8 million Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Number of suites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142 Number of concession stands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148 Number of escalators/elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14/11

Kind of retractable roof . . . . . . . . .SuperFrame Structural System Square feet opening area on retractable roof . . . . . . . .176,400 Approximate time for roof to open and close . . . . .9-11 minutes Pieces of exterior glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,100 Tons of steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16,000 Size of north window . . . . . . .six panels, 88 tall and 244 wide

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JIM IRSAY

Owner and Chief Executive OfficerJim Irsay has guided the Indianapolis Colts to an elite standing in the NFL since assuming control of the franchise in 1997. The team his family has owned since 1972 has earned the league's best regular-season record (114-46) over the last 10 seasons, while earning the most playoff appearances (nine) by any team. The Colts have won six division titles in that same period, five consecutively in the AFC South (2003-07) as well as the 1999 AFC East crown. In 2008, the Colts became the only team in the NFL's 89 years to post six consecutive seasons with 12 or more wins. Under Irsay's leadership, the team twice has ranked second in league history for the most wins during a five-year, regular-season span (63, 2003-07; 2004-08), tying for the fourth-most wins in a four-year regularseason span (51, 2004-07; 2005-08) and tying for the sixth-most total wins (regular season and playoff) over four seasons (57, 2003-06). The Colts have won 10+ games in seven straight regular seasons, tying the second-longest streak in NFL history, and the franchise stands alone in earning victory streaks of at least seven consecutive games in five consecutive regular seasons (2003-08). This season marks the beginning of a new Colts era as Head Coach Jim Caldwell assumes his role in a club leadership structure that includes President Bill Polian. Caldwell assumes the field general position from Tony Dungy, who ended his tenure last January as the Colts' winningest head coach. In his role as associate head coach in 2008, Caldwell worked with Irsay, Polian and Dungy as the club won its last nine games, posted a 12-4 record and reached the playoffs. Last season held significance beyond the playing field as the team opened Lucas Oil Stadium, a stateof-the-art facility that ranks among the NFL's finest venues. The club played before sellout crowds and set a seasonal home attendance record. The club won its last six home games to continue its rich winning heritage for its most treasured asset: Colts fans. Moving from the RCA Dome after 24 memorable seasons, the club unveiled its Ring of Honor in Lucas Oil Stadium. The Twelfth Man remains placed prominently among those enshrined - Robert Irsay, Bill Brooks, Chris Hinton, Jim Harbaugh and Ted Marchibroda. Lucas Oil Stadium will host Super Bowl XLVI in February, 2012. The sporting world's crowning event will culminate worldwide attention for Indianapolis, its surrounding areas and some of the nation's finest residents. A hallmark of Jim Irsay's tenure of stewardship was the 2006 season, when the franchise won its fourth World Championship, a 29-17 victory over Chicago in Super Bowl XLI. Following its triumphant title return, the team was welcomed by a raucous crowd lining downtown streets and filling the RCA Dome. Irsay responded by sending the Lombardi Trophy on a tour throughout Indiana. The 50-stop, 3,130-mile tour gave fans an opportunity to see, touch and have pictures taken with the trophy. That fall, he created a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for fans to compete for one of five authentic Super Bowl rings. The effort raised more than $225,000 for charity and entertained thousands who witnessed the 10 finalists take their chance to pick one of five treasure chests that contained a ring inscribed with, 'Colts Fan.' Irsay joined the professional staff in 1982, following his graduation from Southern Methodist University, where he received a degree in broadcast journalism. He was named Vice President and General Manager in 1984. He served in that capacity until taking the role of Senior Executive Vice President, General Manager and Chief Operating Officer in April of 1996. In January of 1997, he assumed sole ownership of the team and has served as its Owner and CEO since that time. An active and participating owner, Irsay chairs the league's Legislative Committee and serves on both the Finance Committee and the Super Bowl Policy Committee. He also has served on the Executive Committee of the Management Council and the Pro-College Relations Committee. Additionally, he was a member of the Realignment Working Group and the Working Club Executive Committee that authored the NFL's Collective Bargaining Agreement in 1993. His community leadership in Central Indiana includes board service on the United Way of Central Indiana, Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee, the Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Association, The Indy Partnership and Noble of Indiana. Jim and his wife, Meg, oversee the Colts' extensive contributions program. Passionate advocates for education, the Irsay family established a four-year scholarship at SMU awarded to a graduate of an Indiana high school. In their home city and state, the Irsays are active supporters for programs that address domestic violence, children with disabilities and their families, environment, cancer research and contemporary dance. Although his professional life has been totally focused on football, he is a music aficionado who collects rare guitars (including Jerry Garcia's Tiger and one of George Harrison's guitars), an Americana fan who collects rare historical documents and a poet who purchased Jack Kerouac's original manuscript of On the Road. Irsay has allowed the scroll to be exhibited around the world. Jim and Meg have three daughters: Carlie, who is pursuing graduate work in psychology, Casey, a graduate of Indiana University's Kelley School of Business now working for the franchise, and Kalen, a senior at Indiana University.4

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BILL POLIANBill Polian is in his 12th season as President of the Indianapolis Colts. Polian oversees all football and administrative aspects of the Colts. His football blueprint has established one of the best periods of achievement in Colts history, and it has placed Indianapolis among the NFL's elite teams. Since Polian's 1998 arrival, no NFL team has had more overall playoff appearances than the Colts. Since 1999, the club has amassed a 114-46 (.713) mark to stand as the NFL's winningest regular-season team by a margin of four games over its nearest competitor. The Colts are the only team to make the playoffs nine times in the last 10 seasons, advancing to the divisional, conference or league title round in five of the past six years. The club leads the NFL with seven consecutive playoff appearances and is the only NFL team to have double-digit victory totals and playoff berths annually since the 2002 NFL Realignment. The Colts have won six division championships (1999, 200307) during Polian's tenure. The Colts (three times) join Chicago, San Francisco and New England (all twice) as the only franchises to amass 50+ regular-season victories in a four-year span, while the club's 63 victories from 2003-07 and 2004-08 tie the second-highest five-year total in the NFL's 89 seasons. The 2008 Colts finished with a 12-4 record to become the only NFL team with 12+ victories in six consecutive seasons. Indianapolis produced eleven-plus victories for the sixth consecutive year, joining Dallas as the only teams to accomplish that feat, and last season was the club's seventh consecutive with 10+ victories, a streak that ties the second-longest in NFL history. Additionally, Indianapolis became the only NFL team to win seven or more consecutive regular-season games in five consecutive seasons. From 2003-07, the club won a franchiserecord five straight AFC South championships, placing Indianapolis as one of nine teams since the 1970 Merger to win five or more consecutive division crowns. The 2006 Colts culminated years of franchise dedication by winning Super Bowl XLI, 29-17 over Chicago. It was the club's first title appearance in 36 years. The Super Bowl XLI victory brought the club its fourth World Championship and the first since its move to Indianapolis. In 2002, Polian oversaw the hiring of Coach Tony Dungy. Together they produced seven consecutive playoff teams, while Dungy became the winningest Colts head coach. Polian led the hiring of Coach Jim Caldwell in 2009. In 1999, the Colts produced a 10-game turnaround from 1998, then the best one-season improvement in NFL history. Polian and pro football success are synonymous. In 21 seasons as a general manager or president with Indianapolis, Carolina and Buffalo, his teams have made 15 playoff, seven championship game and four Super Bowl appearances, while winning a World Championship. Polian's Buffalo teams reached the Super Bowl three times and reached the big game again the year after his departure. He built Carolina into the winningest expansion franchise in sports history, taking the club to the NFC Championship game in its second season. He helped build Grey Cup title teams with two CFL franchises (Montreal and Winnipeg). Polian's teams have produced a combined regular-season record of 214-137. Discounting the start-up seasons of 1985-86 at Buffalo, 1995 at Carolina and 1998 in Indianapolis, Polian's mark is 198-89, a .690 winning percentage. Polian has been part of 12 11+-victory seasons and has won a division championship at every stop. Polian's record is unique among NFL administrators. He was recognized by The Sporting News in 1999 as Executive of the Year, his fifth time as the award's winner. Polian and the late George Young are the only executives to win the award five or more times. Polian, Young and the late Jim Finks are the only men to win the award multiple times. A keen judge of talent, Polian's expertise has changed the face of the Colts. His first 11 draft classes yielded QB-Peyton Manning, RBs-Edgerrin James and Joseph Addai, WRs-Reggie Wayne and Anthony Gonzalez, LBs-Rob Morris and Cato June, DEs-Dwight Freeney and Robert Mathis, DBs-Bob Sanders, Antoine Bethea, Marlin Jackson and Kelvin Hayden, OTs-Ryan Diem and Tony Ugoh, OGs-Jake Scott, Mike Pollak, Jamey Richard and TE-Dallas Clark, among others. Polian also found key free agent additions in C-Jeff Saturday, KMike Vanderjagt, RB-Dominic Rhodes, LB-Gary Brackett and DB-Melvin Bullitt. Indianapolis ended the 2008 season with 48 of 53 active-roster players having played only for the Colts. Manning, James, Addai, WRMarvin Harrison, Wayne, Freeney, Mathis, Vanderjagt, OT-Tarik Glenn, Saturday, June, Bethea and Sanders have earned Pro Bowl honors during Polian's tenure. Polian entered the league as a pro scout for Kansas City in 1978. He worked five years with the Chiefs before moving to Winnipeg of the CFL as personnel director. He helped build a team that won two CFL Championships. He served as personnel director with the Chicago Blitz of the USFL in 1984. Polian joined Buffalo in 1984 as pro personnel director and was promoted to general manager on December 30, 1985. Under Polian, Buffalo reversed a record of 8-40 from 1984-86 to a 58-22 mark from 1988-92. The Bills reached Super Bowls XXV, XXVI and XXVII during Polian's tenure, then added a fourth Super Bowl in 1993. Polian presented former Buffalo Head Coach Marv Levy at his Pro Football Hall of Fame induction in 2001. Polian served as Vice President of Football Development for the NFL during the 1993 season. He helped formulate and implement the league's current Collective Bargaining Agreement. Long active in league affairs, Polian serves as a member of the NFL Competition Committee, Diversity Committee, Management Council Senior Executive Committee and is Chairman of the College Relations Committee.5

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CARLIE IRSAY-GORDONVice PresidentCarlie Irsay-Gordon joined the Colts as Vice President in July of 2008, and with sister, Casey, represents the next generation of ownership for the club. Raised in and around the Colts organization, Carlie interned with the club in the football and marketing departments while pursuing her undergraduate degree. She also has represented the team at NFL Owners' meetings since 2004. Carlie graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in religious studies with a minor in geoscience from Skidmore College in 2005. She currently is in the process of completing a doctoral degree in clinical psychology (Psy.D.) from Argosy University in Dallas. Carlie is an active member in the Junior League of Dallas, where she resides with her husband, Zach Gordon.

CASEY IRSAY FOYTVice PresidentAs a vice president in the front office, Casey Irsay Foyt represents the next generation of ownership for the Indianapolis Colts. She graduated from Indiana University with a degree in sports marketing. Following graduation, she worked for the NFL in London, England, planning the first regular season NFL game played outside North America, as well as special events associated with the game. The game was played in October, 2007 and featured the Giants and the Dolphins playing in Wembley Stadium before 81,000 fans. She joined the Colts in May of 2007 and focuses her energy on marketing and community relations. She helped revitalize the Colts Women's Organization and planned the group's first major fundraising in 2007. She has been attending NFL Owners' meetings as she becomes more knowledgeable in all aspects of the league and the Colts franchise. Casey resides in Indianapolis with her husband, Anthony J. Foyt, IV.

PETE WARDSenior Executive Vice PresidentPete Ward is in his 29th season with the Colts. He was promoted to Senior Executive Vice President in 2001. He earned the title of Executive Vice President of Administration in 2000, after serving as Senior Vice President of Administration in 1999. Ward's duties and experiences within the organization have been wide-ranging and varied. He began his affiliation with the Colts in 1981 as a summer and seasonal intern in the team's public relations department. Following his graduation from the University of Virginia in 1982, Ward was hired as the club's Administrative Assistant. He was promoted to Director of Operations shortly after the team's arrival in Indianapolis in March 1984 and was named Vice President of Administration in 1997. In addition to general administrative management, Ward's various duties have included overseeing the team's training facility expansion and serving as a liason on the Lucas Oil Stadium project. He currently serves on the boards of the IU Simon Cancer Center, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Indiana Convention and Visitors Association and the Boys and Girls Club of Zionsville. Born in New Orleans, La., and raised in Carmel, Calif., Ward resides with his wife, Lena, and their children, Maddy (15) and Sam (14).

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DAN EMERSONGeneral CounselDan Emerson has represented the Colts since March of 1984. Emerson is a partner of Bose McKinney & Evans, LLP, where he serves on the firm's Executive Committee. After graduating from Macalester College, Emerson attended law school at Indiana University. He is a member of the Indianapolis, Indiana State, American, Federal, and Seventh Circuit Bar Associations, and is a past Chairman of both the Indiana State and Indianapolis Bar Associations' Labor and Employment Law Sections. He is listed in Best Lawyers in America and is a Distinguished Fellow of the Indianapolis Bar Foundation. Emerson serves on the Senior Advisory Board of the Sports and Entertainment Academy of Indiana University's Kelley School of Business. Born in Wichita Falls, Texas, Emerson resides in Indianapolis with his wife, Ginny. They have two daughters, Emily (27) and Ashley (25).

DAN LUTHERSpecial CounselDan Luther enters his seventh season as Special Counsel to the Colts. Luther, a partner in the Chicago-based firm of Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw, has represented Colts Owner Jim Irsay in legal matters since 1988. Luther graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown University with an A.B. in government and economics in 1983 and a J.D. in 1986. Luther grew up in Sayreville, New Jersey. He and his wife, Cathy, have two children, Meg (19) and Joe (16), and reside in River Forest, Ill.

TOM ZUPANCICSenior Vice President of Sales and MarketingTom Zupancic is in his 26th season with the Colts, his fourth as as Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing. Zupancic served from 2004-05 as Senior Vice President of Business Development and from 1999-2003 as Vice President of Business Development after being named Director of Business Development in 1998. He served from 1984-98 as the Colts Strength and Conditioning Coach. A graduate of Indiana Central University, Zupancic was inducted into the Indiana Football Hall of Fame in 1998. He was given the Sagamore of the Wabash by Governor Evan Bayh in 1996. He serves on the boards of the Childrens Bureau of Indianapolis, Broken Wagon Ranch, PAL Club and the Speedway Exchange Club, and was one of 10 recipients of the 2000 Jefferson Award. He is on the Board of Trustees of the University of Indianapolis, the Board of 21st Century Charter School and the GEO Foundation National Board for Education. He was an alternate on the 1980 and 1984 USA Greco Roman Olympic wrestling teams. He was born September 14, 1955, in Indianapolis. Zupancic and his wife, Carrie, reside in Indianapolis with their three children, Katie (19), Jake (18) and John Thomas (16).

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COLTS COACHESI N D I A N A P O L I S

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JIM CALDWELLHEAD COACH

Jim Caldwell enters his first season as head coach of the Colts. Caldwell has served with Indianapolis for the past seven years. He was elevated to associate head coach with the club on January 21, 2008. Caldwell spent his first three seasons as quarterbacks coach before earning the expanded title of assistant head coach prior to the 2005 season. Caldwell's leadership has helped the Colts annually have one of the NFL's most prolific offenses. Indianapolis ranked 3rd in AFC passing, 5th in the NFL, in 2008. The performance was a continuation of excellence that has seen the Colts rank in the top four in NFL scoring offense in eight of the past 10 years. The club has ranked in the top three in AFC passing offense, and top six in the NFL, for 11 consecutive seasons, including six times as the conference leader. The offensive performance has helped the franchise earn historic accomplishments. Indianapolis (2003-08) produced 11-plus victories for the sixth consecutive year, joining Dallas (1976-81) as the only teams to accomplish that feat, and it extended its NFL mark to six consecutive seasons with 12+ victories, a record previously shared with Dallas (4 seasons, 1992-95). The club also led the NFL with a seventh consecutive playoff appearance, a span that includes Caldwell's tenure in Indianapolis. The Colts extended their streak of double-digit victory seasons to seven, tying the second-longest streak in NFL history (16, San Francisco, 1983-98; 7, Dallas, 1975-81). Indianapolis produced a nine-game winning streak over the last half of the season, making the franchise the only one in NFL history to win seven or more consecutive regular-season games in five consecutive seasons (8, 2004; 13, 2005; 9, 2006; 7 and 6, 2007; 9, 2008). Indianapolis' winning ways include a 32-10 record in AFC South play, and Indianapolis is the only NFL team to have doubledigit victory totals and playoff appearances each season since the 2002 NFL Realignment. In 2008, the Colts posted a 12-4 mark, while winning their last nine games to earn a playoff appearance. QB-Peyton Manning was 371-555-4,002, 27 TDs/12 ints., for a 95.0 rating. Manning earned a third Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player Award (2003, 2004, 2008), tying QB-Brett Favre (2005-07) as the only three-time winner. Manning earned a ninth Pro Bowl nomination, his seventh consecutive honor. The offense produced a franchise-record 11th consecutive season with 5,000+ net yards. Manning extended his own NFL records with his 11th consecutive 25+-TD season and a ninth 4,000+-yardage season. Manning has 176 consecutive starts, the most ever to start a career and the second-longest QB streak in NFL history (269, Brett Favre). Manning has a club-record nine double-digit victory seasons. His 117 starting wins rank 2nd in club history (118, John Unitas) and are tied for 6thmost in NFL history (169, Favre; 148, John Elway; 147, Dan Marino; 125, Fran Tarkenton; 119, Unitas; 117, Joe Montana). Manning overcame knee surgery prior to the season and helped the club post four 50+ receivers (WRs-Reggie Wayne, 82-1,145, 6 TDs; Marvin Harrison, 60-636, 5 TDs; Anthony Gonzalez, 57-664, 4 TDs; TE-Dallas Clark, 77-848, 6 TDs) for only the second time in club history (2004). Harrison (1,102) finished the season with the 2nd-most receptions in NFL history, while he and Manning remained the most productive QB-WR tandem in NFL history (953 completions, 12,766 yards, 112 touchdowns). Wayne earned a third consecutive Pro Bowl bid and produced his fifth consecutive 1,000+ season. Clark broke his franchise seasonal position reception mark and eclipsed the franchise TE seasonal reception yardage mark of John Mackey (829, 1966). In 2007, Indianapolis ranked 5th in NFL offense, the club's fifth straight top five league finish. The club amassed 450 points to rank 3rd in points per game, the fifth straight year the club was among the league's top three scoring units. Indianapolis extended its franchise record with a fifth consecutive AFC South championship and became the first team in 76 years (Green Bay 1929-31) to open three con8

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secutive seasons with 7-0 starts. Caldwell continued his outstanding stewardship of Manning (337-5154,040, 31 TDs/14 ints., 98.0 rating). The offense topped 400 points for the fifth consecutive year. With an injury interrupting the season of Harrison, Manning helped Wayne (104-1,510, 10 TDs), Clark (58-616, 11 TDs) and RB-Joseph Addai (261-1,072, 12 TDs) have solid years. Wayne became then the 16th NFL receiver to produce a 1,500+ season. Clark broke the club seasonal position records of Mackey for receptions and touchdowns, while Addai became the third Colts back to open a career with consecutive 1,000+ seasons. Indianapolis earned its NFL-record seventh offense with a 4,000+ passer and 1,000+ rusher and receiver. In the NFL's 89 seasons, the Colts own seven of the league's 32 such offenses. Manning was 362-557-4,397, 31 TDs/9 ints., 101.0 rating in 2006. He earned MVP honors in the club's 29-17 Super Bowl XLI win over Chicago. Manning became the first QB since Steve Young (1991-94) with three consecutive 100+ rating seasons. He helped Harrison (95-1,366, 12 TDs) and Wayne (86-1,310, 9 TDs) produce 1,000+ seasons. Indianapolis became the only NFL team to open consecutive seasons with 9-0 starts. Coming off consecutive seasons as the NFL's MVP, Manning was 305-453-3,747, 28 TDs/10 ints., 104.1 rating in 2005 to help guide the club to a 13-0 start and a 14-2 mark, the franchise seasonal record for victories. The Colts won a league-record 13 consecutive games by seven or more points, and the club ranked 2nd in NFL scoring offense (439). Manning combined with Harrison (1,146) and Wayne (1,055) for 1,000+ seasons. From 1999-04, Manning threw for 4,000+ yards in an NFL-record six consecutive seasons. In 2004, Manning had one of the NFL's finest seasons, completing 336 of 497 passes for 4,557 yards and 49 touchdowns with 10 interceptions for a 121.1 rating. His 67.6 completion percentage, yards, touchdowns and rating set Colts seasonal-bests, while his touchdowns (since broken) and rating set NFL seasonal records. Manning (49; 121.1) broke the prior NFL records of Dan Marino (48, 1984) and Young (112.8, 1994). Manning opened the season with multiple touchdown passes in a league-record 13 consecutive games. Manning directed the club to a franchise seasonal-best 6,475 net yards, while helping the Colts (522) amass then the fifth-highest NFL seasonal point total and become then only the 10th team to score 500+ seasonal points. The club also became the first in league history to produce three 1,000+-yard, 10+-TD receivers (1,210 yards, 12 TDs, Wayne; 1,113, 15, Harrison; 1,077, 10, WR-Brandon Stokley). Manning had six games with 4+ touchdown passes, tying Marino's NFL seasonal record (6, 1984). Manning had five consecutive 4+-TD games, besting Marino's prior NFL mark in that category (4, 1984). The 2004 season marked the third straight year Manning set the club's seasonal completion percentage record. His 67.0 mark in 2003 bested his own seasonal mark of 66.7 in 2002. In 2002, Manning's 392 completions and 591 attempts also set Colts seasonal records. Caldwell joined Indianapolis from Tampa Bay, where he served as quarterbacks coach during the 2001 season. At Tampa Bay, Caldwell assisted with an attack that saw WR-Keyshawn Johnson post a franchise seasonal-best 106 receptions for 1,266 yards, while QB-Brad Johnson set a club seasonal mark with 340 completions. Caldwell has more than 20 years of collegiate experience. Caldwell spent 1993-2000 as head coach at Wake Forest. In 1999, Caldwell led the school to its first winning season and bowl game since 1992. Wake Forest defeated Arizona State, 23-3, in the Aloha Bowl. During Caldwell's tenure, Wake Forest ranked among the nation's Top 25 teams in passing offense on four different occasions, including 10th in the NCAA in 1995. That season, QB-Rusty LaRue established seven NCAA passing records. Caldwell served as an assistant coach at Southern Illinois (1978-80), Northwestern (1981), Colorado (1982-84), Louisville (1985) and Penn State (1986-92). Caldwell joined Penn State as wide receivers coach. He then coached quarterbacks the following season and added passing game coordinator responsibilities in 1988. At Penn State, Caldwell tutored QB-Kerry Collins, who went on to win the Davey O'Brien Award as the nation's top college quarterback and the Maxwell Award as the nation's most outstanding player. Caldwell has coached in six bowl games and won a national championship with Penn State in 1986. In addition to serving on Joe Paterno's staff that won a national championship, Caldwell tutored under three other coaches who won collegiate titles (Rey Dempsey, Southern Illinois; Bill McCartney, Colorado; Howard Schnellenberger, Louisville). Caldwell was a four-year starter as a defensive back at Iowa and worked as a graduate assistant for9

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the Hawkeyes in 1977. He holds a bachelor's degree from Iowa. Caldwell was born on January 16, 1955 in Beloit, Wis. He and his wife, Cheryl, have four children: Jimmy, Jermaine, Jared and Natalie. JIM CALDWELL CAREER HISTORY 2009, Indianapolis Colts, Head Coach 2008, Indianapolis Colts, Associate Head Coach 2005-07, Indianapolis Colts, Assistant Head Coach/Quarterbacks 2002-04, Indianapolis Colts, Quarterbacks Coach 2001, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Quarterbacks Coach 1993-2000, Wake Forest University, Head Coach 1988-92, Penn State University, Passing Game Coordinator/Quarterbacks 1987, Penn State University, Quarterbacks Coach 1986, Penn State University, Wide Receivers Coach 1985, University of Louisville, Assistant Coach 1982-84, University of Colorado, Assistant Coach 1981, Northwestern University, Assistant Coach 1978-80, Southern Illinois University, Assistant Coach 1977, University of Iowa, Graduate Assistant 1973-1976, University of Iowa, Player

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HEAD COACHCecil Isbell

COLTS COACHING HISTORY2 0 0 9I N D I A N A P O L I S C O L T SYEARS RECORD9-22-1 1-7 1-11 3-9 61-52-1

ASSISTANTS

1947-49 1949 1950 1953 1954-62

*1 Walter Driskill Clem Crowe Keith Molesworth Weeb Ewbank

N. Campofreda; D. Edmunds; A. Hewlitt; J. Hunt; J. Taylor (1947); T. Stidman (1947-48); L. Defilippo (1948); B. Conkright; W. Driskill; M. Michalske; C. ORourke (1949) J. Hunt; W. Millner; R. Pirro O. Douglas; R. Richards; N. Wasylik R. Murphy; J. Thomas (1954); F. Cumiskey; C. Winner (195462); T. Hughes (1955); F. Lauterbur (1955-56); H. Ball (195662); J. Bridgers; B. Shaw (1957-58); D. McCafferty; J. Sandusky (1959-62) G. Marchetti; J. Mutscheller; B. Pellington (1963); C. Winner (1963-65); D. McCafferty; J. Sandusky (1963-69); B. Arnsparger; D. Bielski (1964-69); C. Noll (1966-68); B. Boyd (1969) L. Rymkus (1970); D. Bielski; B. Boyd; H. Bullough; J. Idzik; J. Sandusky (1970-72); B. (Red) Miller (1971-72) R. Callahan; B. Franklin; D. Voris (1973); P. McCulley; G. Sefcik; G. Young (1973-74); D. Doll; F. Lauterbur; J. Smith (1974) P. McCulley; J. Smith (1975-76); F. Lauterbur (1975-77); W. Dovell (1975-78); M. Baughan; G. Boutselis (1975-79); D. Bielski; E. Khayat (1977-79); R. Hawkins (1978); J. Symank; E. Zwahlen (1979) D. Bielski; G. Boutselis; J. Idzik; E. Khayat; J. Symank; J. Vitt; C. Weber; R. Wietecha (1980-81); B. Boyd; C. Powers (1981) B. Carson (1982); B. Valsente (1982-83); Z. Bratkowski; G. Cunningham; H. Hunter; R. Mann; R. Theder; R. Venturi; M. Westhoff (1982-84); G. Catavolos (1984) S. Sidwell (1985); J. Becker; G. Catavolos; G. Hill; T. Lovat; B. Matthews; C. Myers; K. Rowen; R. Venturi; T. Zupancic (1985-86); J. Marshall (1986) J. Becker; G. Hill; T. Lovat; J. Marshall; C. Myers; K. Rowen (1987-88); L. Burtnett; G. Catavolos; R. Venturi; T. Zupancic (1987-91); G. Briner (1989); L. Kennan; D. Scarnecchia (1989-90); M. Jackson; B. Muir; B. Seely (1989-91); D. Ahrens; S. Croom; S. Furness (1991) A. Gibbs (1992); G. Catavolos; D. Painter; F. Peay; J. Robertson; B. Seely; R. Venturi (1992-93); N. Nicolau (199294); R. Blackledge; G. Huey; T. Zupancic (1992-95); F. Bruney (1993-95); T. Batta; G. Blache; J. Johnson, H. Kuhlmann; J. Robinson; P. Thomas; V. Tobin (1994-95); L. Infante (1995) F. Bruney (1996); T. Batta; G. Blache; R. Blackledge; C. Bresnahan; C. Davis; B. Geis; G. Huey; J. Johnson; H. Kuhlmann; J. Robinson; P. Thomas; T. Zupancic (1996-97); J. Robertson (1997) G. Blache; R. Tillman; T. Zupancic (1998); B. Arians (199800); G. Catavolos; G. Huey; T. Marciano; T. Moore; H. Mudd; M. Murphy; J. Norvell; J. Pagano; K. Spencer; J. Torine (199801); V. Fangio; T. Grantham (1999-01); R. Howell (2000-01); J. Hufnagel (2001) C. Foerster (2002-03); D. Reynolds (2002-06); J. Caldwell; C. Christensen; R. Howell; G. Huey; R. Meeks; T. Moore; H. Mudd; M. Murphy; R. Purnell; J. Teerlinck; R. Thomas; J. Torine; A. Williams (2002-07); P. Metzelaars (2004-08); L. Frazier (200506); R. Perry; B. Teerlinck; C. Woods (2007-08); F. Reich (2008) C. Christensen; L. Coyer; R. Howell; G. Huey; P. Metzelaars; M. Murphy; R. Perry; F. Reich; R. Rychleski; B. Teerlinck; J. Teerlinck; R. Thomas; J. Torine; A. Williams *4 Succeeded Kush for last game *5 Succeeded Dowhower for last three games *6 Succeeded Meyer for last eleven games

Don Shula

1963-69

73-26-4

Don McCafferty *2 John Sandusky Howard Schnellenberger *3 Joe Thomas Ted Marchibroda

1970-72 1972 1973-74 1974 1975-79

26-11-1 4-13 2-9 41-36

Mike McCormack Frank Kush *4 Hal Hunter Rod Dowhower *5 Ron Meyer Ron Meyer *6 Rick Venturi

1980-81 1982-84 1984 1985-86 1986 1987-91 1991

9-23 11-28-1 0-1 5-24 3-0 33-36 1-10

Ted Marchibroda

1992-95

32-35

Lindy Infante

1996-97

12-21

Jim Mora

1998-01

32-34

Tony Dungy

2002-08

92-33

Jim Caldwell

2009

*1 Succeeded Isbell for last eight games *2 Succeeded McCafferty for last nine games *3 Succeeded Schnellenberger for last eleven games

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CLYDE CHRISTENSEN

Assistant Head Coach/Wide ReceiversClyde Christensen enters his first season as assistant head coach/wide receivers coach of the Colts. This marks his eight season with the club. Christensen joined Indianapolis from Tampa Bay, where he served as offensive coordinator during the 2001 season. In 2008, Christensen's receiving corps continued producing outstanding numbers. WRs-Reggie Wayne (82-1,145, 6 TDs), Marvin Harrison (60-636, 5 TDs) and Anthony Gonzalez (57-664, 4 TDs) ranked among the top four Colts receivers. Wayne produced his fifth consecutive 1,000+ season and earned a third consecutive Pro Bowl bid. Wayne (576-8,129, 53 TDs, 26 100+ games) ranks 3rd in club career receptions, yards and touchdowns and 2nd in 100+ games. Harrison returned from an injury to have a solid season. Harrison (1,102-14,580, 128 TDs) ranks 2nd in NFL career receptions, 4th in yards and 5th in touchdown receptions. He and QB-Peyton Manning remained among the finest QB-WR tandems in NFL history (953 completions, 12,766 yards, 112 touchdowns). Harrison is T2nd in NFL history with 59 100+ games, and he is 9th in NFL career touchdowns. He has receptions in 190 consecutive games, the 2nd-longest NFL streak and the most ever to start a career. Gonzalez followed a solid rookie season by increasing his totals in 2008. The receivers helped Manning produce his league-best ninth 4,000+ season. In 2007, Harrison had an injury-interrupted season, while Wayne (104-1,510, 10 TDs) and Gonzalez (37-576, 3 TDs) had solid seasons. Wayne earned a second Pro Bowl bid in becoming then only the 16th NFL receiver to produce a 1,500+ season. Wayne became only the third receiver in NFL history to increase seasonal reception totals over the first seven career seasons (Raymond Berry, 1955-61; Shawn Jefferson, 1991-97), and Gonzalez's performance ranked among the best in club history by a rookie. With the performances of Manning (4,040), Wayne and RB-Joseph Addai (1,072), Indianapolis earned its NFL-record seventh offense with a 4,000+ passer and 1,000+ rusher and receiver. In the NFL's 89 seasons, the Colts own seven of the league's 32 such offenses. In 2006, Harrison (95-1,366, 12 TDs) and Wayne (86-1,310, 9 TDs) earned Pro Bowl honors. Harrison became the only NFL receiver with eight consecutive 1,000+-yard and 10+-TD seasons. In 2005, Harrison (82-1,146, 12 TDs) and Wayne (83-1,055, 5 TDs) produced 1,000+ seasons and played key roles in the club's 13-0 seasonal start. In 2004, Christensen's unit had one of the best seasonal performances in NFL history. Harrison (86-1,113, 15 TDs), Wayne (77-1,210, 12 TDs) and WR-Brandon Stokley (68-1,077, 10 TDs) became the first NFL receiving trio to post 1,000+-yardage and 10+-touchdown seasons. The performances stand along with San Diego (1980), Washington (1989), Atlanta (1995) and Arizona (2008) as the only teams with a trio of 1,000+ receivers. Harrison (4), Wayne (4) and Stokley (5) had 13 of the club's 14 regular-season 100+ reception yardage games, and Wayne (10-221 vs. Denver) broke the club's playoff yardage record of WR-Raymond Berry (178 yards in 1958 NFL Championship Game). In 2002, Christensen helped Harrison become the only NFL player to amass 100+ receptions in four consecutive seasons (115, 1999; 102, 2000; 109, 2001; 143, 2002), while his reception total set a new NFL seasonal record. Harrison was 94-1,262, 10 TDs in 2003, and he set then the five best seasons in club history during his 1999-03 performances. Christensen spent six seasons at Tampa Bay, tutoring tight ends from 1996-98 and quarterbacks from 1999-00 before being promoted to offensive coordinator. In 2001, WR-Keyshawn Johnson (106 receptions) and QB-Brad Johnson (340 completions) posted franchise seasonal marks. Christensen helped the late-season development of rookie QB-Shaun King in 1999. King led Tampa Bay to four wins late wins for the NFC Central title, becoming then the second rookie quarterback since the 1970 Merger to win a playoff game. Before joining Tampa Bay, Christensen spent 1994-95 as co-offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach at Clemson. From 1992-93, he served as quarterbacks coach at Maryland, tutoring QBs-John Kaleo and Scott Milanovich. Kaleo ranked 2nd nationally in total offense in 1992 while Milanovich finished fourth in 1993. In 1991, Christensen served as running backs coach at South Carolina. He was receivers/tight ends coach at Holy Cross in 1989, then was promoted to offensive coordinator in 1990. From 1986-88, Christensen was offensive coordinator, running backs and quarterbacks coach and in charge of recruiting at East Carolina. Christensen oversaw quarterbacks and wide receivers at Temple from 1983-85, after serving as quarterbacks and receivers coach at East Tennessee State from 1980-82. He began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Mississippi in 1979. Christensen was an All-America quarterback at Fresno City Junior College in 1975. He continued his col12

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legiate career as a QB at North Carolina, where he lettered from 1977-78, as the school earned Peach and Liberty Bowl bids. Christensen holds a bachelor's degree in industrial relations from North Carolina. Christensen was born on January 28, 1956 in Covina, Calif. Christensen and his wife, Debbie, have three daughters, Rachel, Rebecca and Ruth. They reside in Indianapolis.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Fresno City Junior College 1975; North Carolina 1976-78. Coaching Career: Mississippi 1979; East Tennessee State 1980-82; Temple 1983-85; East Carolina 1986-88; Holy Cross 1989-90; South Carolina 1991; Maryland 1992-93; Clemson 1994-95; Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1996-2001; Indianapolis Colts 2002-present.

LARRY COYER

Defensive CoordinatorLarry Coyer enters his first season as defensive coordinator of the Colts. Coyer joined Indianapolis from Tampa Bay, where he served for two seasons, the final one as assistant head coach. Coyer is entering his 45th year of coaching on either the collegiate or professional level. Prior to arriving in Tampa Bay in 2007 as assistant head coach/defensive line, he spent seven seasons at Denver as linebackers coach (2000-02) and defensive coordinator (2003-06). In 2008, Tampa Bay sported a 9-7 record in the competitive NFC South. Coyer served in an administrative capacity in reviewing the offense and defense. The team ranked 9th in the NFL in total defense, 4th against the pass. The club's 30 takeaways were T2nd-most in the NFC, T5thmost in the NFL, and 22 interceptions tied for the NFC lead and ranked T3rd-most in the NFL. In 2007, Tampa Bay won the NFC South, finishing second in NFL total defense. Coyer's linemen had 30 of the team's 33 sacks, including 15.5 from rookies and first-year players, first in the NFL in that category. DEGaines Adams was a PFW/PFWA All-Rookie Team performer, while first-year DE-Greg White had a teamhigh eight sacks. During his four seasons as Denver defensive coordinator, Coyer's unit consistently ranked among the NFL's most productive, helping the club earn three playoff appearances. The Broncos ranked in the top seven in NFL rushing defense three times, allowing 98.3 yards per game from 2003-06, 4th-best in the NFL during that period. Denver posted consecutive top four NFL rankings in yards per game allowed from 200304. The Broncos (18.3) ranked 6th in NFL scoring defense from 2003-06, and the 2006 unit did not yield a touchdown in the first eleven quarters of play, the longest season-opening NFL streak since 1942. Denver advanced to the AFC Championship Game with a 13-3 record in 2005. CB-Champ Bailey, SJohn Lynch and LB-Al Wilson earned Pro Bowl honors. Denver (85.2) ranked 2nd in NFL rushing defense, the third-best seasonal mark in franchise history. For the season, the Broncos (16.1) tied for third in NFL scoring defense, yielding only 37 points (9.3) in the final four games in earning the AFC West title. In 2004, Lynch and Bailey made the Pro Bowl, while rookie LB-D.J. Williams (114) became only the second rookie (the first in 32 years) to lead the team in tackles. Williams was third in NFL Defensive Rookie-ofthe-Year voting. In 2003, Denver allowed 277.1 yards per game, ranking 4th in NFL defense, to earn its first playoff berth since 2000. Coyer began in Denver as linebackers coach from 2000-02. In 2000, LBs-John Mobley (133) and Bill Romanowski (121) topped the team in tackles, while Wilson (104) ranked 4th. He served as defensive line coach for the New York Jets in 1994. In his other professional stints, Coyer served in the USFL as linebackers coach with the Michigan Panthers (1983-84) and defensive coordinator with the Memphis Showboats (1985). Coyer helped Michigan capture the inaugural USFL championship in 1983. Coyer was defensive coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh from 1997-99. The Panthers produced top five conference finishes in all statistical categories in 1999, and S-Ramon Walker and DL-Demond Gibson earned All-Big East Conference honors. In 1998, the Panthers ranked third in Big East total defense, and the 1997-98 units amassed 62 sacks, the highest two-season total at Pittsburgh since 199091. Coyer was defensive coordinator at Iowa State from 1995-96. Coyer was the defensive coordinator at East Carolina in 1993. He served as defensive backs coach at Ohio State from 1991-92, as assis13

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tant head coach/defensive backs at the University of Houston in 1990, and as linebackers coach at UCLA from 1987-89. Additionally, Coyer was defensive coordinator at Iowa State from 1979-82, Oklahoma State (1978) and Iowa (1974-77), after serving as defensive backs coach at Bowling Green (1968-73). Coyer is a 1964 graduate of Marshall, and he is a member of the university's Football Hall of Fame for his achievements as a player. He served at Marshall as secondary coach from 1965-67. He also had a coaching stint at Massillon (Ohio) High School. Coyer was born in Huntington, W.Va., and is a native of Greenbottom, W.Va. Coyer and his wife, Jan, have two sons, Matt and Justin. Matt was a member of an NCAA Champion soccer team at Indiana University. Justin was an Iowa all-state football player in high school.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Marshall 1961-64. Coaching Career: Marshall 1965-67; Bowling Green 1968-73; Iowa 1974-77; Oklahoma State 1978; Iowa State 1979-82; Michigan Panthers 1983-84; Memphis Showboats 1985; UCLA 1987-89; Houston 1990; Ohio State 1991-92; East Carolina 1993; New York Jets 1994; Iowa State 1995-96; Pittsburgh 1997-99; Denver Broncos 2000-06; Tampa Bay Buccaneers 2007-08; Indianapolis Colts 2009-present.

RICHARD HOWELLAssistant Strength and ConditioningRichard Howell is in his 10th season as assistant strength and conditioning coach with the Colts. Howell is responsible for assisting strength and conditioning coach Jon Torine in all aspects of the club's conditioning program. He previously served as a graduate assistant at North Carolina in the strength and conditioning department. Howell was the head strength and conditioning coach for the Barcelona Dragons of NFL Europe in 1999. He previously served as an assistant coach at Davidson College from 1994-98. He spent the summer of 1997 as an intern in the Carolina Panthers scouting department. Howell was a quarterback at Davidson (1990-93) and was the team captain as a senior. Upon graduation, he held five school records and finished his senior season ranked fourth nationally in scoring for Division 1-AA football. He played one season for Akersberga in a Sweden professional league. He holds a bachelor's degree in biology from Davidson. Howell was born on February 19, 1972, in Bladenboro, N.C. He and his wife, Karen, have three children, Alexis, Jacob and Joshua. They reside in Indianapolis.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Davidson 1990-93. Coaching Career: Davidson 1994-98; Barcelona Dragons 1999; North Carolina 1998-99; Indianapolis Colts 2000-present.

GENE HUEYRunning BacksGene Huey is in his 18th season as running backs coach with the Colts, the longest tenure of any position coach in franchise history. Huey has served for 272 regular-season games, the most among the 121 Colts assistant coaches in club history. In 2008, Huey's corps was led by RBs-Joseph Addai (155-544, 5 TDs) and Dominic Rhodes (152-538, 6 TDs). The tandem performed well in the passing game, combining for 70 receptions, 508 yards and 5 TDs. In 2007, the rushing attack produced 1,706 yards and 19 touchdowns, while14

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being led by Addai (261-1,072, 12 TDs) and RB-Kenton Keith (121-533, 3 TDs). It marked the club's most seasonal rushing scores since 1990 (22). Addai became the third Colts back to open a career with consecutive 1,000+ seasons (Marshall Faulk, 1994-95; Edgerrin James, 1999-2000), and he earned his first career Pro Bowl berth. Addai joined Faulk (1994), James (1999), Alan Ameche (1955) and Norm Bulaich (1971) among Colts RBs to earn Pro Bowl bids within their first two career seasons. Addai's 12 rushing scores tied for 2nd-most in the NFL. Indianapolis ranked 5th in NFL offense and amassed 450 points to rank 3rd in NFL scoring offense. Indianapolis earned its NFL-record seventh offense with a 4,000+ passer and 1,000+ rusher and receiver. In the NFL's 89 seasons, the Colts own seven of the league's 32 such offenses. In 2006, the rushing attack produced 1,762 yards and 17 touchdowns, led by Addai (2261,081, 7 TDs) and RB-Dominic Rhodes (187-641, 5 TDs). Rhodes started every regular-season game and rushed for 113 yards in the club's 29-17 win over Chicago in Super Bowl XLI, and Addai became the third NFL rookie to rush for 1,000+ yards and win in the Super Bowl. Addai had 1,406 scrimmage yards, 3rdbest by a Colts rookie, and produced the fourth 1,000+ rushing season by a Colts rookie. Under Huey's guidance, Faulk (1994-95, 98), James (1999-2000, 04-05) and Addai (2007) have earned a combined eight Pro Bowl berths. James won NFL rushing titles in 1999 and 2000, becoming only the 11th NFL back to win consecutive crowns. James (1,506 rushing/337 receiving) had 1,843 scrimmage yards in 2005, his fourth 1,500+ rushing season. James had a club-record five 1,000+ rushing seasons and totaled six 1,000+ scrimmage yards seasons. James had a club-record five 1,500+ scrimmage yards seasons and a club-record three 2,000+ scrimmage yards seasons. James' 64 career rushing touchdowns surpassed Lenny Moore's club record of 63 that stood since 1964. James was named a Pro Bowl starter each of his first two seasons. He rushed for a franchise-best 1,709 yards in 2000, while scoring 13 touchdowns and totaling a franchise seasonal-record 2,303 scrimmage yards. He set club seasonal marks for touches (450), 100+ scrimmage yards games (15) and 150+ scrimmage yards games (7). James had six 100+ games in 2003, eight in 2004 and nine in 2005. He had a club-record 49 100+ games and ended his Colts career with a 125.7 scrimmage yards per game average. In 2001, Rhodes (1,104) had the most rushing yards in NFL history by an undrafted rookie free agent, and Huey has presided over 12 of the 19 individual 1,000+ rushing seasons in club history. From 1994-98, Faulk rushed for 5,320 yards and 42 touchdowns. Huey joined the Colts after spending 1988-91 as an assistant at Ohio State. Huey tutored wide receivers for three seasons before working with the running backs in his final year. Huey began his coaching career at Wyoming, his alma mater, as a graduate assistant in 1970. He was named head freshman coach in 1972. Huey moved to New Mexico in 1974 as receivers coach, then joined Tom Osborne at Nebraska following the 1976 season. Huey coached receivers at Nebraska until joining John Cooper's staff at Arizona State in 1987. He then moved with Cooper to Ohio State in 1988. Huey played defensive back and wide receiver at Wyoming, and set 13 receiving records. He is the only player in WAC history to win all-conference offensive and defensive honors. He was a co-captain and played on three conference championship teams. Huey was inducted into the University of Wyoming Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame in 2009. He was a D5-69 choice of the St. Louis Cardinals and had NFL experience over the next two years with Minnesota and San Diego. Huey was born July 20, 1947, in Uniontown, Pa. He is married to the former Dyan McClain of Boston, Mass. They reside in Indianapolis with their children, Laura Elizabeth and Aaron Bennett.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Wyoming 1965-68. Coaching Career: Wyoming 1970-73; New Mexico 1974-76; Nebraska 1977-86; Arizona State 1987; Ohio State 1988-91; Indianapolis Colts 1992-present.

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PETE METZELAARS

Offensive Quality Control/Assistant Offensive LinePete Metzelaars is in his sixth season as offensive quality control coach of the Colts. Metzelaars' role was expanded to assistant offensive line coach in 2008, and he assists with other areas of offensive preparation. Metzelaars joined Indianapolis from Wingate University, where he served as an assistant offensive coach in 2003. Metzelaars has assisted the Colts in having one of the NFL's most prolific attacks for the last five seasons. The Colts topped 5,000 net yards in each season, while scoring 522 (2004), 439 (2005), 427 (2006), 450 (2007) and 377 (2008) points. The club's 522 points in 2004 were then the fifth-highest seasonal point total in NFL history, while the Colts set club seasonal marks with 66 touchdowns and 379 first downs. The club ranked 2nd in NFL scoring offense in 2005. The offensive tone helped the club trail in only four games during the season. The Colts won a league-record 13 consecutive games by seven or more points. QB-Peyton Manning was 305-453-3,747, 28 TDs/10 ints., 104.1 rating in 2005 to help guide the club to a 13-0 start and a 14-2 mark, the franchise seasonal record for victories. He combined with WRs-Marvin Harrison (1,146) and Reggie Wayne (1,055) for 1,000+ seasons. RB-Edgerrin James (1,506 rushing/337 receiving) had 1,843 scrimmage yards, marking his fourth 1,500+ rushing season. In 2006, Manning (362557-4,397, 31 TDs/9 ints.), Harrison (95-1,366, 12 TDs), Wayne (86-1,310, 9 TDs) and RB-Joseph Addai (226-1,081, 7 TDs) headlined the offense. In 2007, Indianapolis ranked 5th in NFL offense and 3rd in NFL scoring. Manning was 337-515-4,040, 31 TDs/14 ints., and helped Wayne (104-1,510, 10 TDs), TE-Dallas Clark (58-616, 11 TDs) and Addai (261-1,072, 12 TDs) have solid years. Indianapolis earned its NFL-record seventh offense with a 4,000+ passer and 1,000+ rusher and receiver. In the NFL's 89 seasons, the Colts own seven of the league's 32 such offenses. Manning was 371-555-4,002, 27 TDs/12 ints. in 2008, extending his NFL records with an 11th consecutive 25+-TD season and a ninth 4,000+yardage season. The offensive line was beset with injuries and had only two 16-game performers, yet yielded but 14 sacks, 4th-fewest in the NFL, while setting a club seasonal mark by allowing one sack for every 42.8 pass attempts. The line had five different starting configurations during the season. Metzelaars was a coaching intern with the Colts in the 2003 training camp. He assisted with the tight ends and studied under Tom Moore and Howard Mudd. Metzelaars served as the offensive coordinator at Charlotte Christian School from 1998-02. He served with Barcelona of NFL Europe in 2003. Metzelaars was a D3-82 choice of the Seattle Seahawks and played 16 seasons with Seattle (1982-84), Buffalo (1985-94), Carolina (1995) and Detroit (1996-97). He was 383-3,686, 29 TDs during a career that saw him participate in 235 games, the most ever by an NFL tight end. He played in 169 consecutive games from 1984-95. He was an all-rookie choice with Seattle and participated in Super Bowls XXV, XXVI, XXVII and XXVIII with Buffalo. Metzelaars was a three-time Pro Bowl alternate with Buffalo. He was named to Buffalos 50th Anniversary Team in 2009. Metzelaars was a standout football and basketball player at Wabash College from 1978-82. He was 77-1,196, 9 TDs receiving for his career, helping the school produce a 32-3-1 record. He set school basketball career records for points (1,976) and rebounds (1,176), averaging 19.2 points and 11.4 rebounds per game. Metzelaars set school marks for the two highest seasonal rebounding averages. He scored 45 points and had 13 rebounds in the 1982 NCAA Division III national title contest. He set NCAA field goal percentage records twice, leading the nation as a senior (.753, 271-360), while his career percentage of .724 (784-1,063) is a national record. He was a grid All-America choice in 1981 and twice earned such honors in basketball. Metzelaars was the 1982 National Player-of-the-Year in Division III basketball. He holds a bachelor's degree in economics from Wabash. Metzelaars was born on May 24, 1960 in Three Rivers, Mich. Metzelaars and his wife, Barbara, reside with their sons, Anthony and Jonathan, in Indianapolis.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Wabash College 1978-82. Playing Career: Seattle Seahawks 1982-84; Buffalo Bills 1985-94; Carolina Panthers 1995; Detroit Lions 1996-97. Coaching Career: Charlotte Christian School 1998-02; Barcelona Dragons 2003; Wingate University 2003; Indianapolis Colts 2004-present.16

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MIKE MURPHYLinebackersMike Murphy is in his 12th season as linebackers coach of the Colts, his 25th season in the NFL. Murphy previously served as linebackers coach with Seattle from 1995-97. Murphy's linebacking unit was resilient throughout an injury-plagued 2008 season. Only Clint Session played in every game, while Tyjuan Hagler (nine appearances), Freddy Keiaho (14) and Gary Brackett (12) were limited. Keiaho (114), Brackett (113) and Session (99) ranked among the club's four leading tacklers, and Buster Davis performed admirably in a season-ending starting role for Brackett, the defensive captain. The unit helped produce an 11th-ranked finish in NFL total defense, including a 6th-ranked pass defense that surrendered only six touchdowns, the fewest allowed by any team since the NFL adopted a 16-game schedule. The defense ranked 3rd in NFL red zone efficiency in touchdowns allowed. The linebackers combined to top 40 special teams tackles, led by Jordan Senn's 16. Brackett, Keiaho, Rocky Boiman and Hagler headlined the 2007 unit. Brackett topped the club with 149 tackles, and his four interceptions tied for the club lead. Keiaho (101) was among five players with 100+ stops. Indianapolis ranked 2nd in the AFC, 3rd in the NFL, in total defense, the club's highest defensive ranking since 1971. It was club's fourth top 10 defensive ranking since moving to Indianapolis. Indianapolis ranked 1st in NFL scoring defense, its best showing since 2005 (2nd), and 262 points allowed marked the second-fewest by the club in a 16-game season. The Colts had 22 interceptions, T2nd in the NFL, and produced the best seasonal total since 1979 (23). The club ranked 2nd in the NFL with a +18 turnover ratio (37:19) and takeaways (37). The 2006 unit was led by Cato June, Brackett, Gilbert Gardner and Rob Morris. June (162) and Brackett (123) topped the defense in stops. The club held three playoff opponents under 100 rushing yards. Indianapolis set a franchise playoff record by allowing only 126 net yards and 44 rushing yards in a Wild Card win over Kansas City, then won a 15-6 field-goal slugfest at Baltimore in the Divisional Playoffs. The defense held Chicago to no first downs on six of 13 offensive possessions in Super Bowl XLI, a 29-17 victory. Murphy's 2005 group was led by David Thornton, Brackett and June. Indianapolis surrendered 247 points, the lowest 16game seasonal total in club history and ranked 2nd in NFL scoring defense. Indianapolis held six opponents to single-digit point totals. Brackett topped the club with 131 tackles. June had 109 tackles and returned two of his five interceptions for touchdowns. June became the first Colts linebacker since Duane Bickett (1987) to earn Pro Bowl honors. In 2004, June topped the team with 128 tackles, while Thornton (98) and Morris (94) ranked 2nd and 3rd. Murphy's unit set a club Indianapolis-era record by having five players with interceptions (June, Brackett, Morris, Thornton, Jim Nelson). Thornton topped the team in 2003 with 158 tackles. Murphy started his coaching career at Woonsocket (South Dakota) High School and also coached at Mapleton High School in Denver, Colo., and at Fairview High School in Boulder, Colo. He entered the collegiate coaching ranks as defensive line coach at Vermont (1970-73) before moving to Idaho State (1974-76), where he coached the defensive line in 1974-75 and was defensive coordinator in 1976. He coached linebackers at Western Illinois from 1977-78. Murphy was defensive coordinator with Saskatchewan of the CFL from 1979-83, and he was defensive line coach of the Chicago Blitz of the USFL in 1984. He entered the NFL with Detroit, where he coached linebackers from 1985-89 before coaching inside linebackers with Arizona from 1990-93. He worked in the Pro Personnel Department with Carolina in 1994 before joining Seattle. Murphy played guard and linebacker at Huron (S.D.) University. He was born September 25, 1944, in New York, N.Y. He is married to the former Gaye Groethe of Rapid City, S. D. They have three children, Sam, Sarah and Heather.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Huron University 1963-66. Coaching Career: Woonsocket (South Dakota) High School 1966-67; Mapleton (Denver, Colo.) High School 1968; Fairview (Boulder, Colo.) High School 1969; Vermont 1970-73; Idaho State 197476; Western Illinois 1977-78; Saskatchewan Roughriders (CFL) 1979-83; Chicago Blitz (USFL) 1984; Detroit Lions 1985-89; Arizona Cardinals 1990-93; Seattle Seahawks 1995-97; Indianapolis Colts 1998-present.17

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ROD PERRY

Special Assistant to the DefenseRod Perry enters his third season as special assistant to the defense of the Colts. Perry joined Indianapolis from Carolina, where he served for five seasons as secondary coach. In 2008, the club ranked 11th in overall defense, 6th against the pass, setting an NFL mark by allowing only six touchdown passes, the lowest 16-game total in league history (9, Denver, 1978; Pittsburgh, 1980). The defense ranked 3rd in NFL red zone efficiency in touchdowns allowed, while the club joined Philadelphia as the only teams to rank in the top six in passing offense and defense. Antoine Bethea was the only 16-game starter, while Marlin Jackson (7), Bob Sanders (6) and Kelvin Hayden (10) were limited by injuries. Tim Jennings (12 starts, 16 games), Melvin Bullitt (9, 15) and Keiwan Ratliff (4, 13) made significant contributions. Bethea (126) and Bullitt (4) topped the team in tackles and interceptions. Hayden had three interceptions and was joined by Ratliff with scoring interception returns. The defensive backs had all of the club's 15 interceptions. In 2007, Indianapolis ranked 2nd in the AFC, 3rd in the NFL, in total defense. It marked the club's highest defensive ranking since 1971. It represented the club's fourth top 10 defensive ranking since moving to Indianapolis and was one of the club's eleven top five NFL finishes since 1953. The Colts yielded 279.7 yards per game, the lowest seasonal total since 1971. Indianapolis ranked 1st in NFL scoring defense, its best showing since 2005 (2nd), and 262 points allowed marked the 2nd-fewest by the club in a 16-game season. The Colts had 22 interceptions, T2nd in the NFL, producing the best seasonal total since 1979 (23). Sanders and Bethea earned Pro Bowl bids, while Sanders, among other citations, was named Associated Press NFL Defensive Player-of-the-Year, the first Colts player ever to earn the honor. In 2006, Perry assisted a Panthers defense that had 14 interceptions. DBs-Ken Lucas, Chris Gamble and Richard Marshall topped the club with three interceptions. Carolina (187.5) ranked 2nd in the NFC in pass defense, 4th in the NFL. During his tenure, Carolina had 96 interceptions to rank among the NFL leaders. Carolina ranked in the league's top 10 in pass defense four times from 2002-06 (9th, 2003, 2005; 4th, 2002). In 2005, the Panthers had 23 interceptions, led by Gamble (7) and Lucas (6). In 2004, Carolina had a youthful secondary, with three of four contributors combining for less than a year of NFL starting experience. Gamble earned All-Rookie honors and led the club with six interceptions. Carolina's 26 interceptions set a franchise seasonal-record and topped the NFL in interceptions per pass attempt. In Perry's first two years, Carolina was the only NFL team to start two undrafted cornerbacks, yet the club ranked in the top 10 in pass defense both seasons. The Panthers had a club seasonal-record three scoring interception returns in 2003. Perry coached 1997-01 with San Diego. He helped DBs-Rodney Harrison (1998, 2001) and Ryan McNeil (2001) to Pro Bowl appearances. The 1998 Chargers led the league in total defense and held opponents to the 2nd-lowest completion percentage. Perry served with Houston from 1995-96. Under his guidance, DBs-Darryll Lewis and Blaine Bishop earned initial Pro Bowl honors in 1995. Perry served as secondary coach with Seattle from 1989-91 and with the Los Angeles Rams from 1992-94. Perry began his coaching career at Columbia University in 1985 and Fresno City College in 1986. He spent 1987-88 at Fresno State before starting his professional coaching career. Perry was an All-Big Eight selection at defensive back as a senior at Colorado. He was a D4-75 choice of the Los Angeles Rams, where he played from 1975-82. He earned Pro Bowl honors in 1978 and 1980, totaling 28 interceptions with the club. He is a member of the Rams' 40th Anniversary Team. Perry concluded his playing career with Cleveland from 1983-84, recording two additional interceptions. Perry was born on September 11, 1953 in Fresno, Calif. Perry and his wife, Patrice, have three children, Rodney, Ryan and Miranda. Rodney was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies and works in player personnel with Kansas City. Ryan played football at the University of Hawaii.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Colorado 1972-74. Playing Career: Los Angeles Rams 1975-82; Cleveland Browns 1983-84. Coaching Career: Columbia 1985; Fresno City College 1986; Fresno State 1987-88; Seattle Seahawks 1989-91; Los Angeles Rams 1992-94; Houston Oilers 1995-96; San Diego Chargers 1997-01; Carolina Panthers 2002-06; Indianapolis Colts 2007-present.

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FRANK REICHQuarterbacks CoachFrank Reich is in his first season as quarterbacks coach of the Colts. Reich previously served as offensive coaching staff assistant with the Colts in 2008. He was a coaching intern from 2006-07. In 2008, Indianapolis ranked 15th in NFL total offense and 3rd in AFC passing offense, 5th in the NFL. QB-Peyton Manning was 371-555-4,002, 27 TDs/12 ints., for a 95.0 rating. Manning extended his own NFL records with his 11th consecutive 25+-TD season and a ninth 4,000+-yardage season. Manning earned a ninth Pro Bowl bid, his seventh consecutive. The offense sported four receivers with 50+ receptions for only the second time in franchise history (82, Reggie Wayne; 77, Dallas Clark; 60, Marvin Harrison; 57, Anthony Gonzalez). Wayne produced his fifth consecutive 1,000+ season and earned a third consecutive Pro Bowl bid. Clark set the franchise seasonal records for TE receptions and yards (848). RBs-Dominic Rhodes (45) and Joseph Addai (25) were key components in the passing game as well. The club surrendered 14 sacks, 4th-fewest in the NFL, while setting a club seasonal mark by allowing one sack for every 42.8 pass attempts. Reich was a 14-year NFL veteran quarterback. He was a D3-85 draft choice (57th overall) by Buffalo, where he played from 1985-94, before signing with Carolina in 1995. Reich spent 1996 with the New York Jets and 1997-98 with Detroit. During his playing career, Reich engineered two of the greatest comebacks in football history. He led the University of Maryland from a 31-0 deficit to Miami in 1984 to a 42-40 victory. It was then the greatest comeback in college football history. In the 1992 AFC Wild Card Playoffs, starting for injured QB-Jim Kelly, Reich led Buffalo from a 35-3 third-quarter deficit to a 41-38 overtime comeback victory against Houston. It still stands as the greatest comeback in NFL history. Reich started the next game and led Buffalo to a victory against Pittsburgh in the Divisional Playoffs, before Kelly returned to help lead the team to the Super Bowl. Reich was born December 4, 1961 in Freeport, N.Y. He resides with his wife, Linda, and their three children in Indianapolis.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Maryland 1981-84. Playing Career: Buffalo Bills 1985-94; Carolina Panthers 1995; New York Jets 1996; Detroit Lions 1997-98. Coaching Career: Indianapolis Colts 2008-present.

RAY RYCHLESKI

Special Teams CoordinatorRay Rychleski enters his first season as special teams coordinator of the Colts. Rychleski joined Indianapolis from the University of South Carolina, where he served one season as special teams coordinator and tight ends coach. In 2008, South Carolina ranked 2nd in the Southeastern Conference in kickoff coverage. Under his guidance, TE-Jared Cook was First-Team All-SEC. Rychleski helped the Gamecocks reach the Outback Bowl after not reaching a bowl game the previous season. Rychleski has 29 years of coaching experience, 27 at the collegiate level. Rychleski spent 2001-07 as special teams coordinator and tight ends/H-backs coach at the University of Maryland. In his seven seasons, Maryland had zero punts blocked, the longest streak in Division I-A football. His units blocked 22 kicks and had eight returns for touchdowns during that span. In 2007, Maryland led the country in kickoff return yardage defense, allowing 16.56 yards per KOR. Rychleski coached an All-Atlantic Coast Conference punter for six straight years (2001-06), had one specialist selected in the NFL draft and had five others sign as free agents. During Rychleski's tenure, he helped Maryland to a 56-31 record and five bowl appearances. Rychleski coached four tight ends at Maryland who currently play in the NFL. He was a part of the 2001 team that won the ACC and had a BCS appearance in the Orange Bowl. The school produced at least 10 wins from 2001-03.19

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Prior to Maryland, Rychleski spent eight seasons (1993-2000) at Wake Forest University under Jim Caldwell, coaching the defensive line (1993-95), linebackers (1996-98) and special teams and tight ends (1999-00). Rychleski began his coaching career at the high school level in Pennsylvania in 1979. He spent eight seasons at Temple (1981-88), first serving as a graduate assistant in 1981. Rychleski served as defensive coordinator/inside linebacker coach at Northeastern for two seasons (1989-90) before spending 1991 as graduate assistant at Penn State and one summer with the Toronto Argonauts as a volunteer assistant. Rychleski was special teams coordinator and defensive backs coach at East Stroudsburg University in 1992, where he helped the school to their best record in 13 years. Rychleski was born September 27, 1957 in Old Forge, Pa. He earned his degree in social studies from Millersville (Pa.) State College (now known as Millersville University) in 1979.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Millersville (Pa.) State College. Coaching Career: Temple 1981-88; Northeastern 1989-90; Penn State 1991; East Stroudsburg University 1992; Wake Forest 1993-00; Maryland 2001-07; South Carolina 2008; Indianapolis Colts 2009-present.

BILL TEERLINCKDefensive AssistantBill Teerlinck enters his third season as defensive assistant with the Colts. He previously served two seasons with the defensive line and special teams at Illinois State. Teerlinck works closely with the defensive ends. In 2008, Indianapolis ranked 5th in the AFC, 11th in the NFL, in total defense. The line was led by DEs-Robert Mathis (11.5 sacks, 16 pressures, 5 FF, 3 FR) and Dwight Freeney (10.5 sacks, 33 pressures, 4 FF), who both earned Pro Bowl appearances, the second time in club history two ends were voted to the same Pro Bowl (1958, Gino Marchetti; Don Joyce). Freeney (70.5) and Mathis (53.5) rank first and second in Colts career sacks, and they have combined for 124 sacks, 65 FF and 13 FR. They combined for 22 sacks in 2008, the third time they have topped 20 sacks as a tandem (26.5, 2004; 22.5, 2005). The line produced all of the team's 30 sacks and received key contributions from starters Raheem Brock (54 tackles, 3.5 sacks), Keyunta Dawson (71 tackles) and rookie free agent Eric Foster (49 stops). Josh Thomas, Darrell Reid and Antonio Johnson were among those bolstering the unit. The club ranked 6th against the pass, setting an NFL mark by allowing only six touchdown passes, the lowest 16-game total in league history (9, Denver, 1978; Pittsburgh, 1980). In 2007, Indianapolis ranked 2nd in the AFC, 3rd in the NFL, in total defense. It marked the club's highest defensive ranking since 1971 (1st). The Colts yielded 279.7 yards per game, the lowest seasonal total since 1971 (203.7). Indianapolis ranked 1st in NFL scoring defense, its best showing since 2005 (2nd), and 262 points allowed marked the 2nd-fewest by the club in a 16-game season. The club ranked 2nd in the NFL in turnover ratio (+18, 37:19) and takeaways (37). Teerlinck closely assisted with the defensive line. Freeney (seven games), Brock (five) and Mathis (three) missed parts of the season with injuries, and the line featured a mix of rookies and first-year players in Jeff Charleston, Dawson, Quinn Pitcock and Ed Johnson. At Illinois State, Teerlinck helped tutor DE-Brent Hawkins. Hawkins, a D5-05 choice of Jacksonville, was the runner-up for the Buck Buchanan Award (presented to the top defensive player in Division 1-AA). Hawkins had a conference-record 17 sacks as a senior and was named Defensive MVP of the Hula Bowl. Teerlinck served two years as graduate assistant at Indiana from 2003-04, where he helped develop DE-Victor Adeyanju, a D4-06 choice who started nine games as a rookie with the St. Louis Rams. Teerlinck was a Division II All-America choice at Chadron State. He was an all-league choice in 2002 after leading Division II in sacks. He holds a degree in university studies.

PERSONAL DATA:College: Chadron State 2000-02. Coaching Career: Indiana 2003-04; Illinois State 2005-06; Indianapolis Colts 2007-present.20

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JOHN TEERLINCKDefensive LineJohn Teerlinck enters his eighth season as defensive line coach of the Colts. Teerlinck joined Indianapolis from Denver, where he served as pass rush specialist for five seasons. Teerlinck (Indianapolis, Denver) is one of 23 NFL coaches to win a Super Bowl with more than one team. Teerlinck has coached in the NFL for the past 20 seasons, and this season will mark his 30th season in coaching, his 24th in the professional ranks. He has coached in 27 playoff games with five teams and with three Super Bowl champions (1997-98, Denver; 2006, Colts). In 2008, Indianapolis ranked 5th in the AFC, 11th in the NFL, in total defense. The defensive line was led by DEs-Robert Mathis (11.5 sacks, 16 pressures, 5 FF, 3 FR) and Dwight Freeney (10.5 sacks, 33 pressures, 4 FF), who both earned Pro Bowl appearances, the second time in club history two ends were voted to the same Pro Bowl (1958, Gino Marchetti; Don Joyce). It was the first citation for Mathis and the fourth for Freeney. Freeney's four Pro Bowl bids rank behind only Marchetti (10) and DE-Art Donovan (5) among Colts defensive linemen. Freeney (70.5) and Mathis (53.5) rank first and second in Colts career sacks, and they have combined for 124 sacks, 65 FF and 13 FR. They combined for 22 sacks in 2008, the third time they have topped 20 sacks as a tandem (26.5, 2004; 22.5, 2005). The line produced all of the team's 30 sacks, and received key contributions from starters Raheem Brock (54 tackles, 3.5 sacks), Keyunta Dawson (71 tackles) and rookie free agent Eric Foster (49 stops). Josh Thomas, Darrell Reid and Antonio Johnson were among those bolstering the unit. The club ranked 6th against the pass, setting an NFL mark by allowing only six touchdown passes, the lowest 16-game total in league history (9, Denver, 1978; Pittsburgh, 1980). The defense ranked 3rd in NFL red zone efficiency in touchdowns allowed. Since 2002, the club has five top 10 NFL finishes in scoring defense (1st, 2007; 2nd, 2005; 5th, 2003; 7th, 2002; 7th, 2008). In 2007, Indianapolis ranked 2nd in the AFC, 3rd in the NFL, in total defense. It marked the club's highest defensive ranking since 1971 (1st) and was one of the club's eleven top five NFL finishes since 1953. The Colts yielded 279.7 yards per game, the lowest seasonal total since 1971 (203.7), and it marked only the 8th seasonal average below 280.0 yards in franchise history. Indianapolis ranked 1st in NFL scoring defense, its best showing since 2005 (2nd), and 262 points allowed marked the 2nd-fewest by the club in a 16-game season. The Colts had 22 interceptions to rank T2nd in the NFL, and produced the best seasonal total since 1979 (23). The club ranked 2nd in the NFL in turnover ratio (+18, 37:19) and takeaways (37). Teerlinck cultivated young players in Keyunta Dawson and Ed Johnson. Johnson was selected to the PFW/PFWA All-Rookie Team. In 2006, Mathis (9.5) led the