Indian Painting Ajanta Mahajanaka Jataka Cave no- 1, Ajanta.

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Transcript of Indian Painting Ajanta Mahajanaka Jataka Cave no- 1, Ajanta.

  • Slide 1
  • Indian Painting Ajanta Mahajanaka Jataka Cave no- 1, Ajanta
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka Introduction: The Ajanta caves are situated in the Aurangabad district of Maharashtra. A total of about 30 caves are situated at Ajanta. Paintings and sculptures were made in these caves by the Buddhists from 2nd century B.C. to 7th century A.D.
  • Slide 6
  • Mahajanaka Jataka The monastery one of the oldest in the world, first reveals the Hinayana period (200 B.C. to 200 A.D), where Buddha is represented only by symbols. Near the end of the 5th century A.D. (c. 450- 650 A.D.) the Mahayana influence took over, as seen in caves no. 16,17,2 and1. This brought with it the portrayal of the Buddha in human form.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka Though the pictures depict stories related to the Buddha, the artists portrayed at the same time the costumes and customs of their own epoch, especially the extravagance of the court life. Nor did they overlook lifes comedy and tragedy, its pathos and humour.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 10
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 11
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 12
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 13
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 14
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 15
  • Mahajanaka Jataka The story of Mahajanaka The famous painting Mahajanaka Jataka is done in cave no.1 of Ajanta. According to the story Mahajanakas father, the king of Mithila, was killed by his brother who usurped the throne. Mahajanaka sailed for Suvarnabhumi with his merchandise (goods for sale) but met with a shipwreck and was brought back to Mithila by a goddess.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 17
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 18
  • Mahajanaka Jataka There he married the usurpers daughter Sivali and became king. Eventually he decided to become a recluse (living alone and avoid other people). Here Sivali tries to attract Mahajanaka to material pleasures, but the king is indifferent. The story has been very excellently narrated through different scenes.
  • Slide 19
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 20
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
  • Slide 21
  • Mahajanaka Jataka Different scenes: In one scene a show of dance and music has been arranged by Sivali in her attempt to keep Mahajanaka tied to worldly life. Another scene shows that Mahajanaka goes out of his Palace on an elephant to attend a saints sermon. Other scene shows that Mahajanaka announces his firm decision to retire as a recluse.
  • Slide 22
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka Sivali and her retinue (group of attendants accompanying an imp. person) listen to Mahajanaka in bewilderment. The most remarkable things in this scene are different hairstyles, variety of jewellery, expressive faces, graceful hand gestures, beautiful textile designs.
  • Slide 24
  • Mahajanaka Jataka In order to proclaim the message of the Buddha, the monks employed artists who turned the stone wall into picture books of his life and teaching. Representations from the Jataka tales illustrate his intelligence, noble character, selfless service and compassion by means of legends from his previous births.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka Other scene shows the ladies of the Palace with simple floral garlands, pay homage to an ascetic (not allowing oneself pleasure and comforts), probably Mahajanaka himself. There is simplicity among the figures, which stand in contrast to the lavish decoration of the palace.
  • Slide 26
  • Mahajanaka Jataka One scene shows a prince, probably Mahajanaka, seated under a beautifully ornamented pavilion (temporary building), and is being given a ceremonial bath before coronation with holy water poured over him from decorated pitchers by two attendants, while three maids wait in attendance. The proper synthesis of the details and the characters is subdued enough to highlight the central topic-the royal lustration.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka Stylistic features: Male and female figures confirm to the traditional standards of beauty, with her arched eyebrows, long almond-shaped eyes, straight noses, full lips and slightly pointed chins. Minute changes in the poses, gestures and direction of the faces create variety, so that, surprisingly, there is neither obviousness nor monotony.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka The artists of Ajanta used perspective in a different way. A kind of multiple perspective has been introduced where different objects are perceived as if they were seen from within the panel. With only six pigments in his hand, the Ajanta artist created the vocabulary of the entire color-range, each speaking its own language and giving meanings to others. Far from dramatizing by climaxing colour- contrasts, he took recourse to the more refined expression of tonalities.
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  • Mahajanaka Jataka Here the relationship of proportion is relative, not based on empiric knowledge but depend on emotional importance, spiritual reality- each different situation demanding a new evaluation.