I CAN: Define Motivation Distinguish the 6 types of motivation (Drive, Motive, Intrinsic Motivation,...

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Transcript of I CAN: Define Motivation Distinguish the 6 types of motivation (Drive, Motive, Intrinsic Motivation,...

  • Slide 1
  • I CAN: Define Motivation Distinguish the 6 types of motivation (Drive, Motive, Intrinsic Motivation, Extrinsic Motivation, Conscious Motivation, Unconscious Motivation) Describe a time overjustification interfered with your motivation
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Motivation takes many forms, but all involve inferred mental processes that select and direct our behavior Motivation: What Makes Us Act as We Do?
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Motivation Mental processes that select and direct our behavior Why We Do Things
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007
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  • Office Space Clip
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Types of Motivation Drive Motive Intrinsic Motivation Extrinsic Motivation Conscious Motivation Unconscious Motivation
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Drive Hunger Hunger Thirst Thirst Sex Sex Biologically instigated motivation
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Motive The desire to play video games The Need for Achievement The internal mechanism that selects and directs behavior Urges that are mainly learned rather than biologically based
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Intrinsic Motivation This comes from within the person Desire to engage in an activity for its own sake
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Extrinsic Motivation Desire to engage in an activity to achieve an external consequencelike a reward The anticipation of a reward will continue to be a motivator even when the task holds little or no interest. An extrinsically motivated student may have no interest in the subject, but the possibility of a good grade is enough to keep the student motivated
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Conscious Motivation Having the desire to engage in an activity and being aware of the desire
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Unconscious Motivation Having a desire to engage in an activity but being consciously unaware of the desire Freud: repressed desires, impulses, memories influence motivation A talented basketball player who plays poorly in a game could unconsciously be punishing an over- demanding father or coach
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Theories of Motivation 1.Instinct Theory 2.Drive Theory: aka Drive Reduction Theory 3.Cognitive Theory 4.Psychodynamic Theory 5.Maslowss Humanistic Theory:
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 1. Instinct Theory View that certain behaviors are determined by innate factors Human actions such as ridiculing others can be thought to be akin to an animal attacking a younger animal of the same species to stop them from trying to become a leader in the pack.
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Organism are born with a set of biologically based behaviors that promote their survival Problems with instinctual theories: Can not explain all of human behavior Example: jealousy, modesty, altruism, selfishness
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Fixed-Action Patterns The concept of fixed- action patterns has replaced the older concept of instincts
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Fixed-Action Patterns Genetically based behaviors, seen across a species, that can be set off by a specific stimulus Yawning, whether seen, heard or both, then serves as a releaser in nearby animals
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 2. Drive Theory Drive Reduction Theory View that a biological need (an imbalance that threatens survival) produces a drive Fails to explain human actions that produced, rather than reduced, tension, such as rock climbing
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Homeostasis Does not explain things like why people play, which is rewarding in itself without satisfying a drive
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 3. Cognitive Theory Locus of Control An individuals belief about their ability to control the events in our lives internally or externally People actively determine their own goals and how to achieve them
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Locus of Control Internal LOC You control what happens to you If you study, you get a good grade External LOC Outside influences control what happen Good grades are due to luck or a biased teacher
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 4. Psychodynamic Theory 1.Eros The desire for sex 2. Thanatos The aggressive, destructive impulse. Freud believed that humans have only two basic drives :
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Virtually everything we do is based on one of these urges Since these urges are always building, we continuously need to find acceptable outlets for our sexual (artist creating art) and aggressive (sports) needs Georgia O'Keefe
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 5. Maslows Humanistic Theory Hierarchy of Needs The notion that needs occur in priority order, with the biological needs as the most basic
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Maslows Hierarchy of Needs
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Maslows Self-Actualization State of self- fulfillment in which people realize their highest potential in their own unique way
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 Rewards Rewards dont always interfere with intrinsic motivation For example, some people love their job and get paid for it Airborne Toxic Event
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  • Copyright Allyn & Bacon 2007 As a result of the extrinsic incentive, the person views his or her actions as externally motivated rather than intrinsically appealing For example, when a child receives money for playing video games, they actually may play it less Overjustification
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  • CAN I? Define Motivation Distinguish the 6 types of motivation (Drive, Motive, Intrinsic Motivation, Extrinsic Motivation, Conscious Motivation, Unconscious Motivation) Describe a time overjustification interfered with your motivation