Horizontally Launched Projectiles Conceptual Questions · PDF file 2014. 9. 5. ·...

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Transcript of Horizontally Launched Projectiles Conceptual Questions · PDF file 2014. 9. 5. ·...

  • HORIZONTALLY LAUNCHED PROJECTILES CONCEPTUAL

    QUESTIONS

  • 1.

    • The vertical component of the velocity for a horizontally launched projectile increases in the negative direction from launch to landing.

  • 2.

    • Both bullets hit the ground at the same time since they fall from the same height and the gravitational acceleration is the same for both.

    • ** the horizontal and vertical motions are independent of each other

  • 3.

    •Use the Dy = voyt + ½ at 2 formula. Voy is

    0 m/s for a horizontally launched projectile, and the Dy number should be negative.

  • 4.

    • Increasing the height would affect the time in air, final vertical velocity, and the range of the projectile.

  • 5.

    • The time will increase since it must cover a larger displacement.

    • Since the time increases, it will accelerate longer resulting in a larger final velocity.

    • The increase in time will also increase the range of the projectile, x = v t.

  • 6.

    • The horizontal velocity is not affected by the vertical displacement. Horizontal velocity is constant and depends only on launch speed.

    • The acceleration is due to gravity and is -10 m/s2 for all situations near the Earth’s surface.

  • 7.

    • Increasing the initial velocity of a horizontally launched projectile will affect the horizontal velocity and the range only.

  • 8.

    • The initial velocity is the horizontal velocity, so an increase would result in a larger horizontal velocity.

    • A larger horizontal velocity will create a larger displacement in the x-direction, so range increases.

  • 9.

    • The time in the air is only affected by the height of launch.

    • The vertical velocity depends on the time in the air, not the initial velocity

    •Acceleration is due to gravity.