Golden Gate Bridge Suicide Project 2010 07

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July 2010 Developing a Comprehensive Suicide Deterrent Strategy for those with Serious Mental Illness David W. Covington, LPC, MBA Chief of Adult Services [email protected] 1 Version 1.0

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Transcript of Golden Gate Bridge Suicide Project 2010 07

Page 1: Golden Gate Bridge Suicide Project 2010 07

July 2010

Developing a Comprehensive Suicide Deterrent Strategy for those with Serious Mental Illness

David W. Covington, LPC, MBA Chief of Adult [email protected] 1

Version 1.0

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What we used to think…

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What we know today…

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1999-2009

Important Decade (Programs & Funding): Surgeon General David Satcher declares

suicide “serious public health problem” (1999) SAMHSA develops national network of creden-

tialed crisis centers & 1-800-SUICIDE (2002) Garrett Lee Smith grants provide $40 million

annually for youth suicide prevention for states, tribes & universities (2004)

Joshua Omvig legislation provides array of new services from Veterans Affairs (2007)

’58 – LASPC Crisis Center

’68 – AAS Formed

’09 – Dr. E. Shneidman Dies

’76 – 1st Crisis Center Certified

’99 – Satcher Declaration

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1999-2009

Clinical Research & Understanding: Tad Friend’s New Yorker article “Jumpers”

revisits 1978 Richard Sieden research (2003) Thomas Joiner’s groundbreaking book Why

People Die by Suicide was published (2005) Terry Wise key note at first national gathering

for survivors of suicide attempts (2005) Documentary “The Bridge” (2006) Columbia & Rutgers publish on crisis center

effectiveness and SRAS best practice (2007)

’58 – LASPC Crisis Center

’68 – AAS Formed

’09 – Dr. E. Shneidman Dies

’76 – 1st Crisis Center Certified

’99 – Satcher Declaration

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“17 Year Gap” Research to

Practice

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Current State of Affairs

Despite Advances, Too Many Lives Lost Arizona 7th highest in 2006 (16/100,000

versus 8/100,000 in Connecticut) 986 died by suicide in Arizona in 2007 (twice

the number from homicides) Stigma and fear still a major impact

We must talk about this difficult subject Broad variability in confidence and skills Some staff relieved for the “suicide” burden to

be passed to inpatient care, ER, or niche staff (includes liability and emotional components)

Feel inexperienced & lack de-escalation tools12

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FY20072 Suicides

FY20072 Suicides

FY20083 Suicides

FY20083 Suicides

FY20094 Suicides

FY20094 Suicides

FY201012 SuicidesProjected

FY201012 SuicidesProjected

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“Living Healthy Working Well”®Achieving Better Outcomes, Improved Life-span & Richer Quality of Life

Six Cross-Cutting Leadership Principles

3 C r i s i s P l a n n i n g

4 H e a l t h / W e l l n e s s & L i f e s p a n L o n g e v i t y

1 2 S u i c i d e P r e v e n t i o n & I n t e r v e n t i o n

C l i n i c a l C a r e M g m t

Note: Psychiatric inpatient care may be an important treatment of last resort when medically necessary and community supports are insufficient.

Four Clinical Initiatives/Key Programs

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Site of more than 1,200 deaths by suicide. 17

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Highest risk population (Enrollees) Serious mental illness & addiction Major Depression, Bi-polar

Disorders, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality, Anorexia

Today – Specialized crisis services Niche crisis staff or programs Suicide prevention geared toward

community at large Tomorrow – Core business

Change the culture, provide support and equip with skills

Train entire work-force with ASIST training and infuse latest research

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Maricopa Workforce Survey (N=1,641)

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Behavioral Health Workforce Survey (10/2009)

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I Know Someone Who Died by Suicide

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Question 16 of 16.

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Question 13. TRAINING

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Question 14. SKILLS

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Question 15. SUPPORT

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False. Over one million Americans attempt suicide each year, and over eight million have serious thoughts.

Question 2. Prevalence of Suicidal Desire

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Question 2. Prevalence of Suicidal Desire

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False. Insufficient attention has been given to the very high suicide rates among elderly, nearly 50% higher than 10-24 group.

Question 3. Youth Versus Older Risk

Age Attempts Per Death

All Ages 25:1

Youth 100-200:1

65 and older 4:1

Despite lower rates, youth deaths obviously account for much higher % of total deaths, e.g., 12% versus 0.3%.

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Question 3. Youth Versus Older Risk

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Question 4. SMI Versus General Population

Estimated to be at least 6x greater.

Researchers vary but most agree that between 90% and 99% who die have a diagnosable mental disorder (top 5 below):

1. Major Depressive Disorder2. Bipolar Spectrum Disorder3. Schizophrenia4. Borderline Personality Disorder5. Anorexia Nervosa

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Question 4. SMI Versus General Population

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Question 5. Direct Suicide Questioning

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross.Compared our culture’s feelings about talking openly about death and dying as looking directly into the sun. We tend to only glance at it because of its paralyzing glare and tendency to emotionally disable.

She brought sun glasses by referring to death as a normal human process and event. The American Association of Suicidology believes the same is true for those doing this work, talking about death and suicide openly helps us see the person struggling and provide vital human contact and support.

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Question 5. Direct Suicide Questioning

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Question 6. Is Suicide Preventable?

Not true. Many individuals struggle with ambivalence to the last moments, a fight between the will to live and the desire to end their pain.

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Question 6. Is Suicide Preventable?

In 1975, Dr. David Rosen wrote an in-depth study of six people who survived jumping from the bridge.

Almost unanimously, the survivors said their "will to live had taken over" after they survived. "I was refilled with a new hope and purpose in being alive.”

In 1978, Dr. Richard Seiden published "Where Are They Now?," a study of 515 people who were prevented from jumping from the bridge. He found only 6 percent went on to kill themselves.

(San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 2005)

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Question 6. Is Suicide Preventable?

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Questions 7 & 8. Planting the Idea Myth

Not supported. Research has refuted this idea. Suicidal thoughts are one of the DSM symptoms of major depression. 8.3 million Americans had serious thoughts of suicide last year.

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Question 7. Planting the Idea Myth

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Question 8. Depression Linked to Suicide

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Question 9. Emergency Intervention

Do No Harm. This provocative question was meant to generate dialogue around the importance of emergency intervention by professionals. Our interest is “our” ethics to do no harm and help save lives.

SAMHSA is currently producing an emergency intervention standard protocol for guidance on supporting those at imminent risk.

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Question 9. Emergency Intervention

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Question 10. Why People Die by Suicide

Not true.It's often a process. Most gave some indication they were unhappy, depressed, or considering suicide.

We want to combat stigma head-on so that there is more willingness to discuss openly.

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Why People Die by Suicide, Dr. Thomas Joiner

Capability + Intent

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Why People Die by Suicide, Dr. Thomas Joiner

Highest Suicidal Risk exists when the following three components are all present:

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Question 10. Why People Die by Suicide

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Question 11. Desire to End Psychic Pain

Not generally.They want their pain to end – they don't necessarily want to die. Joiner’s model suggests thwarted belongingness and perception of burdensomeness.

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Question 11. Desire to End Psychic Pain

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Question 12. Axis II – Borderline Personality

Not supported. Approximately 10% end up dying from their suicidal gestures. The life-time prevalence of suicide for Schizophrenia is also between 5% and 10%.

“Why People Die by Suicide” page 18-20

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Question 12. Axis II – Borderline Personality

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Adaptive Change Structure (2009-2011)

Wor

kgro

ups

Adults C&A

1. PNOs (SMI) 2. GMH/SA 3. Children’s PNOs

Public Sector Community Behavioral Health putting suicide prevention and intervention at the core of its business.

Targets of Initiative

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Steering Committee Representative Agency

Senator Huppenthal Arizona Legislature

Beth Alexander Maricopa County Public Defender

Gary Brennan Children’s PNO - QCN

Chief Broderick Superior Court of Arizona, Probation

Nancy Diggs Office of the Monitor

Christy Dye Adult PNO - Partners in Recovery

Penny Free GMH/SA - TERROS

Bill Kennard NAMI Arizona

Nick Margiotta City of Phoenix Police

Laura Nelson ADHS/DBHS

Dr. Carol Olson MIHS County Hospital

Melissa Taylor Arizona Legislature

Dr. Thomas Joiner Florida State (Advisory Capacity)56

Original Founding Membership

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Maricopa Programmatic Suicide Deterrent System Project: Five Key Threads

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ASIST – Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

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SAMHSA Best Practice In 2007, a SAMHSA national workgroup

compared top models and selected ASIST More than 700,000 trained in US alone Instead of warning signs and referral focus,

relationship and direct, open discussion Magellan of Arizona

In Sept 2009 and June 2010, Magellan hosted ASIST T4T trainings for 33 provider designees

Challenged agencies to train all staff Staff report improved confidence and skills

three months after going through the training

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ASIST – Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

2,000+ Trained

Staff

Step 1: Certified Trainers

Step 2: Monthly ASIST

Step 3: National Webinars

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Workforce Survey Findings

ASIST. In comparing how groups performed on the survey, we found those with ASIST training basically tied those who were clinicians. As expected, nurses and physicians are also tremendous supports.

Category N Place

ASIST Certified T4T Trainers

29 1st

Nurses/Physicians 139 2nd

Clinicians 319 3rd

ASIST Trained 152 3rd

Administrators 170 5th

Case Managers 453 5th

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Comparisons for Target Answers

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Equipping Maricopa’s Work Force with ASIST - 2,000+ in 2010Agency

# Trained Target % Trained

#2-Day Sessions

Next Training # T4T

TERROS 259 450 58% 9 6/29 4Southwest Network 139 450 31% 10 6/24 3

CHOICES 111 450 25% 10 6/24 2

Valle Del Sol 70 150 47% 4 TBD 1

Quality Care / FIC 31 200 16% 2 TBD 2

Partners In Recovery 79 250 32% 4 TBD 1

People Of Color 34 250 14% 3 TBD 0

Community Bridges 79 200 40% 3 7/14 3

Ebony House 0 25 0 0 TBD 0

Jewish Family 0 135 0 0 TBD 0

NOVA 21 50 42% 0 TBD 0SWBH 0 135 0 0 TBD 1

TOTAL 823 2,745 30% 45 1741%

Updated 6/22/2010The November 2009 workforce survey demonstrated that nearly 10% of the Maricopa workforce received the two-day ASIST training prior to this initiative (n=152). The data in this slide covers only additional staff newly trained in ASIST in December 2009 and calendar year 2010.

2000

823

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• Self-help or peer support model

• Safe, stigma-free zone for open dialogue and support

Next Steps1. Informal solicitation2. Identify seed funding3. Clinical support model4. Process framework

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• Collaboration with NAMI parents and 1300 N. Central clinic

Next Steps1. Family/Friends Welcome

Packet2. Family/Friends Night Events3. Family/Friends Support

Group4. Pilot & Training

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David W. Covington, LPC, MBA Chief of Adult [email protected]/davidwcovington

Shawn Thiele, LCSWChief, Child and Youth [email protected]

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