Future Internet Visions: An Opportunity for Ireland

download Future Internet Visions: An Opportunity for Ireland

of 32

  • date post

    11-May-2015
  • Category

    Technology

  • view

    1.331
  • download

    4

Embed Size (px)

description

A discussion of European Union Future Internet R&D funding and the TSSG\'s (a research centre in Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland) engagement in these programmes to date, and future opportunities for Irish academia and industry. Presented at the Future Internet Event (http://www.future-internet.ie) Dublin, Wed 29th October 2008.

Transcript of Future Internet Visions: An Opportunity for Ireland

  • 1.Future Internet Visions: An Opportunity for Ireland Future Internet Visions: An Opportunity for Ireland Mchel FoghlExecutive Director Research TSSG Waterford Institute of Technology Wed 29th October 2008Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.org http://www.future-internet.ie

2. Author / TSSG Co-founder of TSSG with Willie Donnelly and Eamonn de Leastar in 1996, joined by Barry Downes in 2003. TSSG Ethos is to support a critical mass of activity at all stages of the innovation lifecycle: basic and applied research, commercialisation, and spin-out/spin-in real commercial activity TSSG metrics: Size: 160 researchers Funding: 50M 1996-2008 Publications: 50 per annum (2006, 2007, 2008) Projects: 45 active, 70 completed (October 2008) No. 1 in Ireland for EU ICT Engagement (FP6 & FP7) No. 1 in Ireland for EI Informatics Commercialisation (10 spin-out/spin-incompanies, 60 new regional jobs created) HEA PRTLI Cycle 3 and Cycle 4 Funding SFI Development, PI Cluster and Research Frontiers AwardsWed 29th October 2008Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.org http://www.future-internet.ie 3. Structure Introduction EU Future Internet TSSGs Engagement in EU Future Internet Opportunities for Irish Companies and Researchers Wed 29th October 2008Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.org http://www.future-internet.ie 4. SECTION Introduction EU Future Internet TSSGs Engagement in EU Future Internet Opportunities for Irish Companies and Researchers Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 5. Introduction: Overview What exactly is the Internet and why has it been successful? What threatens this continued growth and success? How can visions on the Future Internet address these threats? Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 6. Introduction: Generative Internet [Zittrain 2006] of Oxford Internet Institute and Harvard Law School Generative Internet = Services/applications/middleware (Web/REST, other distributed software) Inter-networking (TCP/IP suite) Local networks (Ethernet) Devices (end node PC, routers/switches) You Need Network(s) & Services & Devices [Zittrain, 2006] http://www.harvardlawreview.org/issues/119/may06/zittrain.shtml Wed 29th October 2008Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.org http://www.future-internet.ie 7. Introduction: Standards Services/Middleware: XML: W3C, OASIS, OMG, Inter-networking TCP/IP, http: IETF, Internet Society Networks: Ethernet/WiFi/WiMAX: IEEE Telecommunications: ITU-T, ETSI, 3GPP, Devices: Equipment manufacturers de facto standards e.g. IBM PC compatible (arguably success of ICT driven by Moores Law) Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 8. Introduction: ISOC Internet Model Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 9. Introduction: Ownership Who builds, maintains and owns networks? Telecommunications operators/carriers Who sells internet connectivity: Internet Service Providers (ISPs) But also important are: Enterprise/corporate networks Enterprise/government networks Home networks Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 10. Introduction: Culture Clash Internet-centric view Everything is on public Internet using TCP/IP All services are over this infrastructure Many key software elements open source (bind, sendmail, apache, Linux, ) Telecoms networks may enable some connectivity Expectation of many free services (and use of free software) Telecommunications view Migration of private telecom networks to private TCP/IP Allows same infrastructure to support fixed/mobile convergence Backwards compatibility with existing voice service infrastructure IMS as architecture to encapsulate this Interface to public Internet problematic and insecure Expectation that all services are billable Wed 29th October 2008Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.org http://www.future-internet.ie 11. Introduction: Threat IPv4 Depletion Internet-centric expect TCP/IP to be core to their view of the Future Internet the Future Internet is just the Internet (promise more of the same, lots of free services with variable reliability) Telecoms expect TCP/IP to be core to IMS Future Internet is the Internet technologies deployed using added security/accounting/QoS (promise of no more spam, but fewer free services) BUT availability of new IPv4 addresses due to dry up in 2010! One key enabling infrastructure has reached its capacity! Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 12. Introduction: IPv6 Solution to IPv4 address depletion is adoption of IPv6 One view of Future Internet is business as usual with IPv6 instead of IPv4 No other new solution can be designed, agreed and deployed within the timeframe so we all must move to IPv6 regardless of our longer term viewsWed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 13. Introduction: Summary The Internet is made up of networks, inter-connectivity (TCP/IP), services and devices The core driver has been the cheap hardware for end- user devices and network devices Many of the core software elements have been developed as open source Hardware is cheaper than people, so over time generic networking (IP) and generic software (C/C++/Java) replace specialised vertical market segments (e.g. 3G networks use Unix servers) The main inter-networking protocol IPv4 has now reached the end of its usefulness and we need to migrate to IPv6Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 14. SECTION Introduction EU Future Internet TSSGs Engagement in EU Future Internet Opportunities for Irish Companies and Researchers Wed 29th October 2008 Future Internet Eventhttp://www.tssg.orghttp://www.future-internet.ie 15. EU Future Internet - Funding Programme January 2007 Launch of FP7 (2007-2013) 50 billion over 7 years - largest research funding programme in the world FP7 ICT calls so far ICT Call 1 (deadline: May 2007)