Funding Backlogged Pedestrian and Bicycle Backlogged Pedestrian and Bicycle Infrastructure Projects...

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  • LD 193Maine needs $10.7 million to pay for and complete 39 backlogged bicycle and pedestrian projects like sidewalks, bike paths, and multi-use trails.

    bikemaine.orgAbby King, Advocacy Coordinator, Bicycle Coalition of [email protected] | 207-956-6538

    Funding Backlogged Pedestrian and Bicycle Infrastructure Projects

    The Maine Department of Transportation does not have enough money to pay for improvements that would make communities across Maine safer and more welcoming for biking and walking.

    The MaineDOTs Bicycle and Pedestrian Program has a backlog of 39 pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure projects that is has already approved, but cannot fund. LD 193 would fund the entire backlog of projects.

    The persistent backlog means that communities all over Maine continue to wait for projects that have been chosen as worthy of funding.

    Twenty projects in the backlog, totaling $5.7 million, are shovel-ready. They have already been designed or funded for design by MaineDOT and simply await construction funds. (See Table 1.)

    Nineteen projects in the backlog, totaling $4.9 million, are still waiting for funding for design and construction. (See Table 2.)

    Over and above these projects, there are five multi-use paths across the state that need funding to be completed or expanded. These projects have already been studied and in some cases designed. Yet some have been waiting for construction funds for 15 years. These types of facilities are more expensive to build and there is virtually no funding available for them.

    Maines supply of funds is wholly inadequate to meet growing demand In 2012, the U.S. Congress cut dedicated funding for walking and biking projects in Maine by 47%. MaineDOT receives approximately $4.5 million every two years in federal funds for bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure projects. Each year, MaineDOT can only meet, at most, 10% of the demand for stand-alone bike/ped projects. In 2012, 92 communities applied for a competitive grant for bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure projects. These proposed projects totaled $45 million. Cuts to Municipal Revenue Sharing have forced towns to do more with shrinking budgets, making them more reliant on competitive federal monies awarded by MaineDOT.

    For an interactive map of all 39 unfunded projects, please visit:https://batchgeo.com/map/bikepedbond

  • Bicycle and Pedestrian Projects create jobs in Maine. Building biking and walking infrastructure creates more jobs for Mainers than projects for cars alone. An average bicycle project creates 3.6 more jobs per $1 million invested than a car-only project.1 Small projects like sidewalks and bike paths are labor intensive and more likely to be contracted to local construction companies rather than larger out-of-state firms.

    The Bicycle Coalition of Maine is a statewide organization that works at the local, state, and federal levels to improve the bicycling and walking conditions of Maine communities. We advocate for changes that protect the rights of people who walk and bike, increase their safety, and encourage more to join their ranks. These efforts help Maine sustain a vibrant economy, a clean environment, and a healthy workforce.

    LD 193 Creates Jobs, Improves Transportation Safety and Access, and Benefits Communities All Across Maine

    1 Garrett-Peltier, Heidi, Pedestrian and Bicycle Infrastructure: A National Study of Employment Impact, Political Economy Research Institute University of Massachusetts, Amherst, June 2011, p. 1, Accessed 2/5/15 at http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.362.5819&rep=rep1&type=pdf 2 Maine Department of Transportation, State of Maine Pedestrian and Bicycle Crash History 2009 2013, accessed 12/3/14 at http://www.maine.gov/mdot/traffic/documents/2014/crashdata/Peds_BikescrashPublication09-13.pdf3 FHWA, An Analysis of Factors Contributing to "Walking Along Roadway" Crashes: Research Study and Guidelines for Sidewalks and Walkways. Report No. FHWA-RD-01-101, FHWA, Washington D.C., 2001.4 Reynolds, Connor CO et al. The impact of transportation infrastructure on bicycling injuries and crashes: a review of the literature Environmental Health. October 2009. P. 17. Accessed 2/6/15 at http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1476-069X-8-47.pdf 5 INPIRG, Transportation and the New Generation. Accessed 12/3/14 at http://inpirg.org/reports/transportation-and-new-generation6 AARP Public Policy Institute, Analysis of the National Household Travel Survey, accessed 12/3/14 at http://www.aarp.org/research/ppi/liv-com2/resources/nhts-AARP-ppi-liv-com/

    References

    More people are choosing to bike and walk they need safe places to do so. Over 1,300 pedestrians and over 1,000 bicyclists were hit by cars in Maine from 2009 - 2013.2 Of those hit, 55 pedestrians and 6 bicyclists were killed. In 2014 alone, 12 pedestrians and 2 bicyclists were killed. Many are hit while walking on or adjacent to the road in a place without sidewalks.

    Sidewalks, multi-use paths, and similar facilities improve safety. Providing walkways separated from the travel lanes could help to prevent up to 88 percent of pedestrian deaths that occur when the pedestrian is walking in the road.3 Bicyclists who travel on bike lanes and bike paths have a lower risk of crashing and being injured than those that ride on the road with traffic.4

    Mainers need access to alternative transportation. Americans are driving less than they used to, and young people are leading this trend. Vehicle miles driven by people aged 16 34 decreased by 23% from 2001 to 2009.5 Older Americans need safe transportation options like biking and walking. Over 17% of Maines population is 65 or older and about 21% of Americans 65 or older do not drive.6

    Maines Current Supply of Funds Cant Keep Up With Growing Demand. In 2012, the U.S. Congress cut dedicated funding for walking and biking projects in Maine by 47%. MaineDOT receives approximately $2.2 million every year in federal funds for bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure projects. This funding is only enough to meet, at most, 10% of the demand that Maine communities have for bicycle and pedestrian projects.

  • 20 Projects Are Already Designed or Funded For Design

    TABLE 1 Municipality County

    Funding

    Needed For Project Description Funding

    Needed

    Augusta Kennebec Construction Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Improvements connecting the Farrington Elementary School to the Augusta Middle and High School Complex.

    $137,024

    Bangor Penobscot Construction Sidewalks and crosswalk improvements along Hogan Road, Longview Drive, and Stillwater Ave.

    $144,518

    Ellsworth Hancock Construction Sidewalk on Route 1A and connecting Birch Ave to Church St

    $300,400

    Farmington Franklin Construction Sidewalk to fill gap on Farmington Falls Road and Main Street

    $91,165

    Gardiner Kennebec Construction Multi-Use Path for the Cobbossee Stream Trail connecting the KRRT to Route 126

    $1,136,000

    Gorham Cumberland Construction Multi-Use Path connecting downtown Gorham to neighborhoods along a discontinued RR bed. Including connections to sidewalks.

    $576,800

    Kennebunk York Construction Drainage and Pedestrian Improvements on Factory Pasture Lane and Depot Street.

    $208,000

    Lubec Washington Construction Sidewalks on Washington Street $157,400 Norway Oxford Construction Sidewalks to connect the Oxford Hills

    Comprehensive School to the Gouin Athletic Field Complex

    $102,400

    Orrington Penobscot Construction Sidewalks on Route 15 $528,603

    Phillips Franklin Construction Sidewalks on Main Street $241,782

    Raymond Cumberland Construction Sidewalks on Main Street $125,382

    Rockland Knox Construction Sidewalks connecting downtown to the library, nursing home, and community rec. building

    $53,243

    Sanford York Construction Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements at Willard Elementary and Sanford Junior High.

    $165,600

    Scarborough Cumberland Construction Sidewalks on Gorham Road and Crosswalks at the Route 1/Gorham Road Intersection

    $442,960

    Searsport Waldo Construction Sidewalks on Prospect Street connecting residential neighborhoods to Route 3

    $314,400

    Standish Cumberland Construction Sidewalks connecting Route 25 and Route 25 to Colonial Marketplace and the elementary school.

    $556,980

    Waterboro York Construction Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements connecting neighborhoods, sport fields, and the Middle School.

    $375,700

    Waterville Kennebec Construction Sidewalks at Inland Hospital connecting to Kennedy Drive and Wilkes Street

    $69,600

    Wilton Franklin Construction Closing a Gap in The Sidewalks on Main Street $50,030

    TOTAL

    $5,777,987

  • TABLE 2 Municipality County

    Funding

    Needed For Project Description Funding

    Needed Bangor Penobscot Design and

    Construction Bicycle and Pedestrian connection from Sylvan Road to Stillwater Ave

    $513,278

    Bangor Penobscot Design and Construction

    Sidewalk on Finson Road, Phase 3 of Downeast School sidewalk improvements

    $122,483

    Bath Sagadahoc Design and Construction

    Sidewalk on Oak Grove Ave and Judkins Ave $152,710

    Bath Sagadahoc Design and Construction

    Design for a Multi-Use Path connecting Brunswick Bike/Ped Path to Bath and West Bath

    $160,000

    Bethel Oxford Design and Construction

    Sidewalks on Main Street $33,391

    Calais Washington Design and Construction

    Sidewalk, curb ramps, and crossing safety improvements from Garfield Street to Calais Elementary

    $97,582

    Camden Knox Design and Construction

    Sidewalks and some curb e