Fauvism to Cubism

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Fauvism to Cubism. Chapter 21, Part 1 of 2. Rebekah Scoggins Art Appreciation March 26, 2013. Fauvism. Introduced in Paris Characterized by areas of bright, contrasting color and simplified shape and composition - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Fauvism to CubismChapter 21, Part 1 of 2Rebekah ScogginsArt AppreciationMarch 26, 2013

  • FauvismIntroduced in ParisCharacterized by areas of bright, contrasting color and simplified shape and composition Stunned critic called them Les fauves, which is French for The Wild Beasts Officially separate from the French Academy and the official Salon Went even further with color than van Gogh and Gauguin had before, using it both for expressive and structural ends

  • Henri Matisse, Woman With the Hat, 1905. Fauvism.

  • Henri Matisse, The Joy of Life (Le bonheur de vivre), 1905-1906. Fauvism.

  • Henri Matisse, Harmony in Red (The Red Room), 1908-1909. Fauvism.

  • Andr Derain, London Bridge, 1906. Fauvism.

  • German Expressionism Shared the expressive goals of the Fauves. Desire to display emotions very pronounced Developed imagery characterized by vivid, often angular simplification of their subjects, dramatic colors contrasts, with bold, at times crude finish. Built on van Gogh and Gauguin (like Fauves) and Munch. Used the power of Expressionism to address the human condition, often exploring such themes as natural life, sorrow, passion, spirituality, and mysticism.

  • Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Street, Berlin. 1913. German Expressionism: The Bridge.The Bridge appealed to artists to revolt against academic painting and establish a new, vigorous aesthetic that would form a bridge between the Germanic past and modern experience.

  • Wassily Kandinsky. Blue Mountain. 19081909. German Expressionism: The Blue RiderThe Blue Rider wanted to develop an art that would turn people away from false values toward spiritual rejuvenation. Thought that paintings should be exact replicas of some inner emotion. Kandinsky hoped to create art only in response to what he called inner necessity or the emotional stirrings of the soul, rather than in response to what he saw in the world.

  • Wassily Kandinsky. Composition IV. 1911. German Expressionism: The Blue Rider

  • Cubism

  • Pablo Picasso. Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (The Young Girls of Avignon). Paris. June-July 1907. Cubism.

  • Pablo Picasso. Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (The Young Girls of Avignon). Paris. June-July 1907. Cubism.

    African Masks.

  • Georges Braque. Houses at lEstaque. 1908. Cubism.

  • Paul Czanne. Mont Sainte-Victoire. 19021904. Post-Impressionism.Georges Braque. Houses at lEstaque. 1908. Cubism.

  • Georges Braque. The Portuguese. 1911. Analytical Cubism.Analytical Cubism involved talking apart, or breaking down, the subject into its various aspects.

  • Pablo Picasso. Guitar. 1912-1913. Analytical Cubism.

  • Pablo Picasso. Violin, Fruit, and Wineglass. 1913. Synthetic Cubism.Synthetic Cubism was a process of building up or combining bits and pieces of material.

  • Pablo Picasso. Still Life with Chair Caning. 1912. Synthetic Cubism.

    The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Purchase. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Purchase. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Purchase. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Purchase. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Purchase. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York.The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1941. 41. 505. Photograph by David Heald. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift, Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1941. 41. 505. Photograph by David Heald. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.Philadelphia Museum of Art. The George W. Elkins Collection. E1936-1-1.The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Franz H. Hirschland, 1957. (57.181). Photograph: 1991 The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource, NY.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by Scala-Art Resource, NY. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. Photograph: 2002 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.