EPA 608 Certification Study Guide - HVAC Training .4 | P a g e CORE SECTION, EPA Section 608...

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Transcript of EPA 608 Certification Study Guide - HVAC Training .4 | P a g e CORE SECTION, EPA Section 608...

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    EPA 608 Certification

    Study Guide

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    Foreword

    All HVACR technicians must become certified for the equipment they work on, under the Environmental

    Protection Agencys (EPA), refrigerant recovery and recycling program.

    In order to become certified you must pass a test or series of tests, consisting of multiple choice

    questions. The certifications and sections to the test are:

    Core Section. Information that applies to all certification types.

    Certification Class I. Small appliances under 5 pounds of refrigerant.

    Certification Class II. High Pressure. HVACR units over 5 pounds.

    Certification Class III. Low Pressure units including Centrifugal chillers.

    Certification Universal. All three, Type I, Type II, and Type III.

    Most residential and small commercial HVACR technicians need to be Class II Certified Everyone must

    pass the core test (25 questions) and one to 3 of the other sections. If you take and pass all four

    sections you become universal certified.

    A 70% passing rate is required.

    The test questions are made available to testing organizations from the EPA bank of test questions.

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    Contents Contents ................................................................................................................................................ 3

    CORE SECTION, EPA Section 608 Refrigerant Recovery ................................................................................ 4

    TYPE 1 (Small Appliances) ........................................................................................................................... 17

    TYPE II (High-Pressure) ................................................................................................................................ 20

    TYPE 3 (Low-pressure) ................................................................................................................................ 25

    EPA 608 Definitions ..................................................................................................................................... 31

    Core Test Sample Questions ....................................................................................................................... 34

    Type I Sample Test Questions ..................................................................................................................... 46

    Type II Sample Test Questions .................................................................................................................... 51

    Type III Sample Test Questions ................................................................................................................... 57

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    CORE SECTION, EPA Section 608 Refrigerant Recovery

    This study guide follows the outline from the EPA describing the subject material to be used for

    certification exam questions. The titles displayed as . Descriptions displayed in italics are from

    the EPA that outlines subjects to be covered are from the EPA.

    The other text following the highlighted text provides further explanation.

    The CORE section is required for all certifications. This section covers the environmental impact

    of refrigerants, CFCs and HCFCs, the Clean Air Act and EPA regulations.

    ... Destruction of ozone by chlorine...

    Ozone Depletion

    Chlorine reacts with Ozone and creates Chlorine Monoxide. Chlorine Monoxide doesnt last

    long and the molecules soon return to the original chlorine state. This reaction continues with

    one chlorine destroying thousands of Ozone molecules.

    The primary objective of EPA Section 608, is to prevent further Depletion of the Ozone layer

    in the earths stratosphere. Most of the Ozone is in the layer of the atmosphere called the

    stratosphere. The Troposphere is the first layer extending from the ground to 6-7 miles above

    the surface. The stratosphere is located from 6-7 miles up, to 30 miles above the earths

    surface.

    ... Presence of chlorine in CFC and HCFC refrigerants...

    Refrigerants, CFC and HCFC, containing Chlorine are the source of the Ozone depletion

    problem. The refrigerants are harmless in the lower layer of the atmosphere, but they

    eventually drift up into the stratosphere. The increased UV in the stratosphere breaks the CFC

    and HCFV down releasing the Chlorine contained in the refrigerants.

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    ... Identification of CFC, HCFC, and HFC refrigerants (not chemical formulas, but idea that R-12 is a CFC, R-22 is an HCFC, R-134 is an HFC, etc.)...

    REFRIGERANTS

    CFC chlorofluorocarbon

    C CHLORO (Chlorine)

    F FLUORO (Fluorine)

    C Carbon

    Common CFC refrigerants include R-11, R-12, R-113, R-114, R-115, R-500 and R-502

    HCFC hydrochlorofluorocarbon

    H Hydro (Hydrogen)

    C Chloro (Chlorine)

    F Fluoro (Fluorine)

    C Carbon

    Common HCFC refrigerants include R-22, 123 and 124

    HFC hydrofluorocarbon

    H Hydro (Hydrogen)

    F Fluoro (Fluorine)

    C Carbon

    Common HFC refrigerants include R-134A

    ... Idea that CFCs have higher ozone-depletion potential (ODP) than HCFCs, which in turn have higher ODP than HFCs...

    Ranking Refrigerants for Potential Damage

    Some refrigerants pose a danger to Ozone depletion. Ozone depletion lets too much UV in.

    Some refrigerants pose a danger to Global Warming. Greenhouse gases trap the heat

    contributing to global warming and climate change.

    CFC and HVFC are bad for Ozone depletion and HFC is not.

    Ozone can be bad or good depending on where it is located in the atmosphere. Good ozone is

    in the Stratosphere where it acts as a UV filter. If ozone is in the Troposphere, the air layer

    closest to the surface, it is considered a pollutant (smog) and is bad.

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    Ozone is a molecule consisting of 3 oxygen atoms bonded together. Chemicals used as

    refrigerants in HVACR (heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration) deplete Ozone, and

    have created a hole in the ozone layer of the atmosphere. Ozone in the atmospheric layer

    below the stratosphere, called the troposphere, is a pollutant and causes a greenhouse gas

    effect contributing to global warming.

    ... Health and environmental effects of ozone depletion...

    Stratospheric Ozone creates a protective layer that filters out ultraviolet (UV) sunlight from

    reaching the earths surface. Too much UV causes weakening of the immune system, increases

    skin cancer and eye cataracts.

    The greenhouse gas effect traps heat close to the earth contributing to global warming.

    ... Evidence of ozone depletion and role of CFCs and HCFCs...

    Since Chlorine Monoxide has a short life, its existence in the stratosphere is the proof that the

    problem of Ozone Depletion is manmade chlorine. In contrast, naturally occurring chlorine,

    dissolves in water and is washed away by rain before it can reach the stratosphere. The

    Chlorine in the CFC molecule does not dissolve in water and the chlorine is not released until it

    reaches the stratosphere.

    Another chemical contained in CFC refrigerants is fluorine. Fluorine does not occur naturally

    with chlorine. The presence of Fluorine in the Stratosphere is further evidence that the source

    of the Ozone depletion problems is manmade refrigerants.

    ... CFC Phase-out Date...

    In 1990 the US Congress amended the Clean Air Act and assigned the EPA (Environmental

    Protection Agency) the responsibility of reducing Ozone depletion by managing air quality and

    atmospheric protection by giving the EPA regulatory powers.

    CFC can no longer be manufactured or imported into the USA effective January 1, 1996.

    However, refrigerant manufactured before this date or refrigerant recovered and

    recycled can be used.

    ... Venting prohibition at servicing...

    Knowingly venting regulated refrigerants is prohibited except for the following:

    Release of minimal amounts (de minimus, meaning not very much or minimal) of refrigerant

    while attempting to recapture, recycle or dispose of refrigerant.

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    Release of refrigerant during normal operation of air conditioning and refrigeration

    equipment as opposed to release during service, maintenance or repair is allowed. An

    example is mechanical purging from a purge unit on a low pressure chiller.

    Leaks more than specified size must be repaired:

    Commercial refrigeration or industrial process refrigeration. Amount of charge is

    more than 50 pounds and leaking 35% annually must be repaired.

    All other leaking 15% annually must be repaired.

    Systems containing less than 50 pounds not specified.

    CFC or HCFC not used as refrigerant may be released. An example is R-22 mixed

    with nitrogen and used as a holding charge. You may not however add nitrogen to

    refrigerant to use this allowance.

    You may release small amounts of refrigerant to purge hoses used with manifold

    gauges. Recovery and recycling equipment manufactured after November 15, 1993

    must have low-loss fittings.

    ... Venting prohibition at disposal...

    When disposing of appliances and units containing CFC and HCFC refrigerants, the refrigerant must be recovered from all appliances at the same rate used for servicing the units. Responsibility for disposal fal