English Language Learners Mission Statement · English Language Learners . Resource Manual . ......

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  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 1

    English Language Learners

    Resource Manual

    This document will be in effect for the 2016-2017 school year.

    Mission Statement

    The Granville Exempted Village School District’s mission-with the support of the community-is to provide superior educational experiences for students in a personal learning environment.

    The purpose of this document it to communicate to our English Language Learners and their parents, the faculty, administration, and the community at large

    the district structure, procedures, and supports as well as Ohio Department of Education guidelines for English Language Learners instruction that are available

    in the Granville Exempted Village Schools.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 2

    Special Thanks to the members of the English Language Learners Resource Manual Committee:

    Gwenn M. Spence-Director of Student Services

    Dawn Parisi-member

    Rhonda Ross-administrative support

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 3

    Table of Contents

    Background ......................................................................................................................................4 Purpose .............................................................................................................................................5 Part I: Ohio Department of Education .............................................................................................6

    Profile of Ohio’s English Language Learners ........................................................................6 Guidelines for the Identification and Assessment of Limited English Proficient Students/English Language Learners ......................................................................................8 English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards ..................................................................10 Tools for Assessing Language Proficiency ............................................................................11 Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA) ..................................................13 Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment Results and Exit Criteria .........................13 Revisions to Ohio’s Title III Accountability Plan LEP Students ...........................................15 Ohio Dept. of Education: Lau Resource Center for Students, Families, and Communities ..........................................................................................................................17 Characteristics of Programs Serving LEP Students in Ohio ................................................18 Information and Guidelines From the Lau Resource Center Ohio Department of Education ..........................................................................................................................20 Promotion and Transfer of English Language Learners ......................................................24 Ohio Statewide Assessment ...................................................................................................26

    Part II: Granville Exempted Village Schools Implementation ......................................................28

    Starting the Identification Process .........................................................................................28 The Process for Initial Assessment or Screening of Students ................................................28 Initial Core Team Meetings ....................................................................................................29 Range of ELL Services Provided in GEVSD ..........................................................................30 Programming Options ............................................................................................................31 Documentation and Monitoring of the Student’s IELAP Progress ........................................32 Some Clarification About ELL Programming: Accommodations vs. Modifications .............33 State-Wide Testing Accommodations .....................................................................................34 District-Wide Testing Accommodations .................................................................................34 Grading, Grade Retention, Promotion, and Transfer ............................................................35 Special Circumstances............................................................................................................35 Student Services ......................................................................................................................36 Exiting the ELL Program .......................................................................................................37 Communication.......................................................................................................................37 Program Evaluation ...............................................................................................................38

    Appendix A – Flow Chart of ELL Program ..................................................................................41 Appendix B – Scale Score Ranges.................................................................................................42 Appendix C - Terminology ............................................................................................................44 Appendix D - Forms ......................................................................................................................45

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 4

    “Strength lies in differences, not in similarities” Stephen Covey

    The Granville Exempted Village School District offers a tradition of excellence to all learners. We recognize the importance of providing meaningful educational programs for English Language Learners. Our educational philosophy is based on the belief that each English Language Learner can develop high levels of English proficiency and master challenging academic content with success. Our graduates are well-prepared and empowered to be thoughtful, productive, and contributing members of their communities, and are equipped with the critical thinking skills and self-sufficiency necessary for success in our ever-changing world. Granville’s Department of Student Services focuses on the educational resources and support services to provide the best educational program to ELL students, providing leadership to ensure that all teachers take affirmative steps to provide ELL students with educational experiences that address the students' English language and academic needs. Services are designed so that students receive effective instruction leading to academic achievement and timely acquisition of English proficiency.

    Background English Language Learner education is mandated as a result of Lau v. Nichols [414 U.S. 563 (1974)], a class action suit originally filed on behalf of Chinese-speaking public school students against the San Francisco Unified school district in 1970. In question was whether non-English speaking students received an equal educational opportunity when instructed in a language they could not understand. In 1974, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the failure of the San Francisco school system to provide appropriate and meaningful instruction to students who do not speak English denied them the opportunity to effectively participate in the public education program and thus violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This act bans discrimination "based on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." The court stated that "there is no equality of treatment merely by providing students with the same facilities, textbooks, teachers, and curriculum; for students who do not understand English are effectively foreclosed from any meaningful education." (414 U.S. at 566, 1974). The court went on to uphold a 1970 memorandum issued by the former Department of Health, Education and Welfare, which stated the following: “Where the inability to speak and understand the English language excludes national origin minority group children from effective participation in the educational program offered by a school district, the district must take affirmative steps to open its instructional program to these students.” (35 Federal Regulation 11595). It was these actions that directed school districts to take steps to help ELL students overcome language barriers and to ensure that they can participate meaningfully in the districts’ educational programs. In Ohio, over 48,000 English Language Learners (ELL) were enrolled in the state’s elementary and secondary public schools during the 2013-2014 school year. The term English Language Learners refers to those students whose native or home language is other than English, and who

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 5

    are now learning to understand, speak, read or write in English in order to fully participate in a school’s educational program. English Language Learner students in Ohio can achieve high educational standards.

    Purpose This resource manual provides a comprehensive document addressing the many issues and circumstances regarding the education of children with diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This guide serves as a means of communicating Granville Exempted Village School’s philosophy, programs, and procedures concerning students who speak a language other than English and may require additional assistance in developing English language proficiency. With an equitable curriculum, strong pedagogical skills, and effective assessment, educators will have what they need to create individualized plans for every student and effective interventions for those students who need additional assistance. This manual is broken into two main sections. The first is the most current information published by The Ohio Department of Education regarding the laws, guidelines, and regulations pertaining to English Language Learners. The next is the procedures that will be implemented by the Granville Exempted Village School District to ensure compliance with the Ohio Department of Education. In some instances, where ODE language is vague or non-existent Granville has made determinations that follow best practices and are in the best interest of our ELL students. If, at any time, during the current school year ODE publishes documentation that contradicts Granville EVSD practices and procedures, Granville will follow ODE guidelines and make the necessary changes to the manual at the annual review.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 6

    Part I: Ohio Department of Education PROFILE OF OHIO’S ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Ohio’s ELLs represent more than 110 different native or home languages. The top 10 language groups include Spanish, Somali, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Pennsylvania Dutch (a dialect of German used by the Amish), Vietnamese, French, Russian and Twi (a language spoken in West Africa). Many of Ohio’s ELLs are children of families who have recently immigrated to the United States from other countries. During school year 2013-2014, Ohio school districts reported serving 12,333 immigrant students who have been enrolled in U.S. schools less than three years. People immigrate to the United States for a variety of reasons. They may come to join other family members or to seek an improved economic opportunity. Others are seeking refuge from political repression or persecution in their home countries. According to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Refugee Services Office, 27,131 new refugees arrived and resettled in Ohio between 2004 and 2013. The refugees’ countries of origin included Somalia, Burma, Vietnam, Russia, Uzbekistan, Cuba, Burundi, Ethiopia, Ukraine, Eritrea, Liberia, Iran and Sudan. In addition to the primary resettlement of refugees in Ohio, there has been a large secondary migration to Ohio from other states. In the Columbus metropolitan area alone, it is estimated there are between 25,000 and 40,000 recently arrived Somali refugees. Other groups of Ohio’s ELLs were born in the United States but speak languages other than English at home. For example, Ohio’s schools enroll students of Puerto Rican, Mexican-American and other Latino backgrounds for whom Spanish is the home language. A significant number of Spanish-speaking children are members of migrant agricultural working families. More than 500 migrant children were enrolled in Ohio’s elementary and secondary schools during the 2013-2014 school year. Also, many children from the Amish communities in northeastern Ohio learn German (Pennsylvania Dutch) as their first language. Approximately 1,000 Amish LEP students were enrolled in schools in Holmes and Wayne counties during 2013-2014. Ohio’s ELLs include students who have not had the benefit of prior educational experiences. Students with limited formal schooling (LFS) are generally recent arrivals to the United States whose backgrounds differ significantly from the school environment they are entering. This category includes students whose schooling was interrupted because of war, poverty, patterns of migration or other reasons, as well as students coming from remote, rural settings with little prior opportunity for sequential schooling. These students may exhibit some of the following characteristics: • Pre- or semi-literate in their native language • Minimal understanding of the function of literacy • Performance significantly below grade level • A lack of awareness of the organization and culture of school (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc., 1997, p.21)

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 7

    A student’s previous experiences with education significantly affect the ease and rapidity with which he or she learns English and other academic material. Collier (1989) found that English learners require at least five to seven years of instructional time to reach academic parity with native English speakers. But, for students with limited formal schooling, Collier and Thomas found that the achievement of academic parity can be delayed an additional one to five years (1989). The primary explanation for this is that students with limited or no experience in the classroom have acquired a different set of skills than those who have had more formal education experiences. Ohio’s goal for all ELLs is to attain English proficiency so that they can achieve the State’s learning standards and fully participate in U.S. society. The length of time required to attain English proficiency will vary according to a number of factors, including age, grade level, extent of prior formal schooling and current level of English proficiency.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 8

    The following information is published by Ohio Department of Education. The current revision is dated March 2012. GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT OF LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS/ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Overview of School District Requirements in Serving Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students/English Language Learners (ELL) In its publication The Provision of an Equal Education Opportunity to Limited English Proficient Students (1992), the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, provides guidelines to school districts regarding their legal obligation to language minority students. The following is a summary of the guidelines. First, school districts must identify all students whose primary or home language is other than English (PHLOTE). The district then needs to assess all PHLOTE students to determine if they are limited English proficient and need special language assistance to participate effectively in the district’s instructional program. After a school district has identified LEP students who need assistance, it must determine what kind of special language service program is to be provided and it must implement the program. Ohio does not prescribe a specific type of intervention program. Thus, school districts have the flexibility to decide on the educational approach that best meets the needs of their LEP/ELL students. Programs must be based on sound theory and best practice. In other words, programs must likely be effective in meeting the educational needs of language minority students. Whatever program is selected, it must provide effective instruction that leads to academic achievement and timely acquisition of proficiency in English. Guidelines and further information about programmatic options for LEP/ELL students are available through the Lau Resource Center of the Ohio Department of Education (see Contact Information on page 16 of this document). In implementing their programs, school districts must ensure that staff members are properly trained and that appropriate curricular materials are used. Classroom facilities should be comparable to those used by other students. In addition, school districts have the responsibility to notify national origin minority group parents of school activities which are called to the attention of other parents. Such a notice, to be effective, may need to be in a language other than English. Once a school district implements a special language program for its LEP students, it must monitor student progress on a regular basis and take steps to modify the program if the students are not making reasonable progress. Focus of this Document The focus of this document is the initial identification of students whose home/native language is not English and the subsequent assessment of their English communication skills to determine if the students are LEP. The information and guidelines in the following pages are intended to serve as a resource for personnel of school districts serving language minority students.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 9

    On the subsequent pages are guidelines for the English language assessment of students whose home/native language is not English. The English Language Assessment of Students Whose Native or Home Language is Not English Purposes of English Language Assessment

    • To determine if a student is limited English proficient (LEP), that is, the student’s level of English proficiency is not adequate to participate effectively in mainstream classroom settings in which English is the only language of instruction

    • To determine the appropriate support to be provided for those students identified as LEP • To help inform instructional decisions relating to the education of LEP students • To determine if a student who has been enrolled in United States schools for less than

    three full school years is eligible for additional accommodations when taking certain Ohio statewide assessments.

    • To evaluate the progress of LEP students in developing English language proficiency • To help determine when a student is no longer LEP and is ready to be exited from the

    district’s LEP program • To help evaluate the effectiveness of the district’s LEP program

    The federal and state definition of an English learner is an individual who:

    • is between the ages of 3 and 21; • is enrolled in an elementary or secondary school; • has a language other than English as the native/home language, whether born in the U.S.

    or another country; and • has such difficulty speaking, reading, writing or understanding English that the student

    may be unable to perform well enough in class or on state tests to meet expected state standards for achievement.

    English Communication Modes to be assessed

    • Listening: How well is the student able to understand spoken English in social and grade-level academic settings?

    • Speaking: How well is the student able to communicate orally in English in both social and academic settings?

    • Reading: How well is the student able to read age-appropriate written materials in English for both social and academic purposes?

    • Writing: How well is the student able to produce writing in English for both social and academic purposes?

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 10

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY (ELP) STANDARDS Like their Native-English speaking peers, ELLs in Ohio are expected to achieve the state’s Learning Standards in the content areas of English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies and other subjects. However, in order to achieve high educational standards leading to college and career readiness, ELLs have the unique challenge of learning a new language and transitioning to a new cultural environment. What are the specific English communication skills ELLs need to access the state’s more rigorous academic content standards? To address this question, Ohio has adopted new English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards. These standards, to be fully implemented in school year 2015-2016, were collaboratively developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), West Ed, Stanford University Understanding Language Initiative, and the states (including Ohio) in the English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA) 21 Consortium (CCSSO, 2014). The ten ELP Standards, developed for kindergarten through grade twelve, focus on English language functions and forms that ELLs need to develop in order to access college and career-ready content standards and to be successful in school. The new ELP Standards are the following: 1. Construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing 2. Participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions 3. Speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics 4. Construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence 5. Conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems 6. Analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing 7. Adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing 8. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations and literary and informational text 9. Create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text 10. Make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade-appropriate speech and writing

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 11

    TOOLS FOR ASSESSING LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY For the purpose of the initial identification of ELL/LEP students, a standardized English language proficiency test must be used. A number of commercial tests have been developed to assess the language proficiency of students whose home/native language is not English. Some of these tests are listed on the following pages. Please note that this list should not be taken as an endorsement by ODE of a particular test. The information is provided as a resource only. School district personnel should carefully review a test instrument before selecting it to ensure that it meets the needs of the program or school. Commercial Tests of English Language Proficiency Basic Inventory of Natural Language (BINL) Grade Levels: K-12 Communication Modes: Listening and Speaking Languages: Arabic, Armenian, Cambodian, Cantonese, Chinese, Creole, Dutch, English, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Hmong, Ilokano, Inpuiaq, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Navajo, Filipino, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Taiwanese, Tagalog, Toishnese, Ukranian, Vietnamese, Yugoslavian Contact: CHECpoint Systems, Inc. 1520 North Waterman Ave. San Bernardino, CA 92404, Tel. (800) 635-1235 Bilingual Oral Language Tests Grade Levels: 4-12 Communication Modes: Listening and Speaking Languages: English, Spanish Contact: Bilingual Media Productions, P.O. Box 9337, North Berkeley, CA 94709 Bilingual Syntax Measure Grade Levels: K-12 Communication Modes: Listening and Speaking Languages: English, Spanish Contact: Harcourt Educational Measurement, 19500 Bulverde Road, San Antonio, TX 78259, Tel: (800) 211-8378 Bilingual Verbal Ability Tests (BVAT) Grade levels: Ages 5-adult Communication modes: Listening, Speaking Languages: Arabic, Chinese (traditional and simplified), English, French, German, Haitian-Creole, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish, and Vietnamese. Contact: Riverside Publishing Co., 3800 Golf Road, Suite 100, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel: (800) 323-9540 IDEA Proficiency Tests (IPT) Grade levels: PreK-12

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 12

    Communication modes: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Language: English Contact: Ballard & Tighe Publishers, 480 Atlas Street, Brea, CA 92621 Tel. (800) 321-4332 Language Assessment Battery (LAB) Grade levels: PreK-12 Communication modes: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Languages: English, Spanish Contact: The State Education Department, 89 Washington Avenue, Room 775 EBA, Albany, New York, 12234, Tel. (518) 474-8220; FAX (518) 474-2021 Language Assessment Scales (LAS) Grade levels: PreK-12, LAS Links Communication modes: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Languages: English, Spanish Contact: CTB/McGraw Hill, 20 Ryan Ranch Road, Monterey, CA 93940 Tel: (800) 538-9547 Maculaitis Test of English Language Proficiency – II (MAC II) Grade levels: K-12 (Reading: 4-12) Communication modes: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Language: English Contact: Questar Assessment, Inc., 4 Hardscrabble Heights, P.O. Box 382, Brewster, NY 10509 Tel: (800) 800-2598 Secondary Level English Proficiency Test (SLEP) Grade levels: 9-12 Communication modes: Listening, Reading Language: English Contact: Educational Testing Service/SLEP Inquiries, P.O. Box 6156, Princeton, NJ, 08541-6156 Tel. (609) 771-7206 Woodcock-Muñoz Language Survey Grade levels: Ages 3-adult Communication modes: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing Language: English, Spanish Contact: Riverside

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 13

    OHIO ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT (OELPA) State and Federal law require an annual assessment of K-12 limited English proficient students to measure their English language proficiency. The Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment is the assessment used for testing English language proficiency for Ohio LEP students in Grades K-12. As OELPA is a progress test instrument, it cannot be used to screen newly identified LEP students. Districts must use screening assessments for that purpose. The OELPA will show progress in English language proficiency that students are making from academic year to academic year. OELPA results are used to determine whether a district is meeting its annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAOs) as required by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. Each school district, based on the number of students and their previous OELPA scores, must annually reach a progress target and an attainment target for English language proficiency. OHIO ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT RESULTS AND EXIT CRITERIA NOVEMBER 2016 Students were administered the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA) in spring 2016. Earlier this year, the Ohio Department of Education reported the delay in score reporting due to the first-year standard setting process. Ohio uses the OELPA scores to determine the English language proficiency levels of students who have been identified as English learners. The score results are used as the state's progress indicator and exit indicator for students to be reclassified from the status of English learner. The OELPA results were posted on Nov. 6, 2016 and the exit criteria based on those results was presented in a memo sent to districts on Nov. 11, 2016. Students who received a Proficient overall performance level must be exited immediately based on the Nov. 11 date. English learner accommodations shall not be allowed on any state tests for students who exited the program as of Nov. 11. The next state tests to be administered are the high school end-of-course tests during the Dec. 5, 2016 to Jan. 13, 2017 test window. A student is reclassified (no longer English learner) when the student has attained a performance level of Proficient on the OELPA. The Proficient performance level is defined as domain/test level scores of 4s and 5s in any combination across all four domains (listening, reading, writing and speaking). Students in grades K - 12 are eligible for reclassification if the student receives a performance level of Proficient. The EMIS window is now open to enter the code (N) to reclassify the student. The district must maintain the reclassification status based on the Nov. 11, 2016 date. In OELPA, there are three overall performance levels: Proficient, Emerging and Progressing. The performance levels are determined as follows:

    • “Proficient” students are those scoring any combination of 4s and 5s across all four domains;

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 14

    • “Emerging” students are those scoring any combination of 1s and 2s across all four domains;

    • “Progressing” students are those scoring any combination of scores across the four domains that do not fall into Proficient or Emerging.

    The performance level definitions above do not match the definitions as currently defined in OAC 3301-13-11. Districts must follow these new exit criteria and performance level definitions beginning with their spring 2016 OELPA data. The ODE will be working over the next several months to propose changes to OAC 3301-13-11, in the effort to align them with the new exit criteria. The new exit criteria correspond to the overall proficiency levels of the OELPA. Scale Score Ranges The four test scale scores are always expressed as three-digit numbers. There are four-digit scale scores for overall performance and comprehension. There are no cut scores for these scales, and Ohio does not use them for any purpose. They are reported because other consortium members plan to use them as the basis for annual growth measurement.

    Scale scores are comparable within the same domain and grade band – i.e., a score of 600 in grade 4 writing and a score of 600 in grade 5 writing indicate the same writing performance -but the cut scores differ across grades, so it is possible for the same scale score to fall in different performance levels in different grades. Grades 9-12 are the exception to this statement; the cut scores for those grades are identical. Performance Levels These are the five performance levels for the OELPA reported as Level 1 – Beginning, Level 2 – Early Intermediate, Level 3 – Intermediate, Level 4 – Early Advanced, and Level 5 – Advanced. Please note on the Family Report, only numeric performance levels are reported.

    A student will receive a numeric performance level for each of the four tests taken. Students who do not take four tests will receive the appropriate results with an explanation for the tests not taken such as INV if the test was invalidated or N if the test was not attempted. The test performance levels for each of the four tests have a range of 1-5 with 5 as the highest. Those four levels will be used to determine the overall performance level. The overall performance level is reported as Proficient, Emerging and Progressing. The overall performance levels are defined as:

    • Proficient means a student scored any combination of level 4s and 5s on the four tests. For example, Listening = 4, Reading = 4, Writing = 5, Speaking = 4.

    • Emerging means a student scored any combination of level 1s and 2s on the four tests. For example, Listening = 1, Reading = 1, Writing = 1, Speaking = 1.

    • Progressing means a student scored a combination of levels that do not meet the Proficient or Emerging levels. For example, Listening = 4, Reading = 3, Writing = 3, Speaking = 4.

    For more information on OELPA, visit the ODE website at education.ohio.gov, keyword search: OELPA.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 15

    REVISIONS TO OHIO’S TITLE III ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS (EFFECTIVE SCHOOL YEAR 2014-2015; REVISED JANUARY 2015) The Ohio Department of Education (ODE), in collaboration with the Ohio ESL Advisory Committee and the American Institute of Research (AIR), has completed a review of Ohio’s Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO) for limited English proficient (LEP) students, as well as criteria for exiting the LEP program. In its review, ODE analyzed longitudinal student performance data and evaluated the AMAOs and exit criteria in terms of appropriateness, reasonableness and concurrence with the U. S. Department of Education (US DoE) Notice of Final Interpretations regarding Title III Assessments and Accountability Provisions, published Oct. 17, 2008. Based on the results of this review process, ODE developed and submitted to US DoE proposed revisions to Ohio’s Title III Accountability Plan to be effective for the 2009-2010 school year. The accountability revisions, which have been accepted by US DoE, are the following: Revised AMAO #1: Limited English Proficient (LEP) students make progress in achieving English Language proficiency Definition of Progress: Increase at least one performance level in either the production (combination of speaking and writing) or comprehension (combination of listening and reading) domains in the OTELA from one year to the next. LEP students who have achieved attainment (Composite Level 4 on the OTELA) in a previous year and are in the trial mainstream year will make progress if they score a Composite Level 4 or 5 on the OTELA in the subsequent year. Progress Target: By the year 2013-2014, 87 percent of ELL students will make annual progress in achieving English language proficiency as measured by performance on the Ohio Test of English Language Acquisition (OTELA). The percentage of students expected to meet this goal between the current school year and 2013-14 will increase incrementally as follows: 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 75% 78% 81% 84% 87% 87.5% Transition Year 2009-2010: LEP students who have achieved attainment (Composite Level 5 on the OTELA in 2009) and are in the trial mainstream year will make progress if they score a Composite Level 4 or 5 on the OTELA in 2010. Revised AMAO #2: LEP Students attain English language proficiency. Definition of Attainment: Achieve a composite score of 4 or higher on the OTELA. AMAO #2 is calculated by taking the total of all ELL students in Ohio’s ELL programs who achieve a composite score of 4 or higher on the OTELA, and dividing by the total number of students in Ohio’s ELL programs.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 16

    Progress Target: By the year 2013-2014, 30 percent of all ELL students served in a Title III program will attain English language proficiency. The percentage of students expected to meet this goal between the current school year and 2013-14 will increase incrementally as follows: 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 26% 27% 28% 29% 30% 31% Contact Information Lau Resource Center Office of Curriculum and Assessment Ohio Department of Education 25 South Front Street, Mail Stop 509 Columbus OH 43215 (614) 466-4109 (Telephone) (888) 644-6732 (Toll Free) (614) 387-0421 (Fax) [email protected] (e-mail)

    mailto:[email protected]

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 17

    OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION: LAU RESOURCE CENTER FOR STUDENTS, FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES Parent notification requirements when students are identified as limited English proficient (LEP) According to the No Child Left Behind Act (Sec. 3302), Local Educational Agencies (LEA) that receive funding under Title III (Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students) of the act have certain requirements relating to parent notification and participation. These requirements are summarized below. Within 30 days of the start of the school year (or within two weeks of placement if not identified prior to the beginning of school), schools must notify parents of limited English proficiency (LEP) students participating in LEP programs of the following: • Reasons for child’s identification and placement; • Child’s level of English proficiency, how assessed, and status of child’s academic achievement; • Type of language acquisition program and method of instruction used in child’s program; • How the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the child; • How the program will help the child learn English and meet age-appropriate academic

    achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation; • Program exit requirements, expected rate of transition and expected rate of graduation; • If applicable, and the LEP student has been appropriately identified as having a learning

    disability, how the program meets the child’s individual education plan (IEP). Rights of the parent: • To remove the child from the program; • To decline enrollment in the program or other program options available; • To obtain assistance in selecting from among available programs. Schools must: • Notify parents within 30 days when the district fails to progress on measurable objectives

    under Section 3122; • Implement an effective means of outreach to parents of LEP students to inform them how they

    can be involved in the education of their children; • Provide above information in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent

    practicable, in a language that the parent(s) can understand.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 18

    The following information is published by The Ohio Department of Education. The current revision is dated January 2012. CHARACTERISTICS OF PROGRAMS SERVING LEP STUDENTS IN OHIO

    School districts have the flexibility to decide on the education approach that best meets the needs of their LEP students and leads to the timely acquisition of the level of English proficiency the students need to succeed in school. Presented here is a brief description of federal law describing districts' responsibilities for selecting programs as well as an overview of different approaches used in Ohio.

    In its ruling in the 1974 Lau v. Nichols case, the U.S. Supreme Court did not mandate a particular type of educational program to address the needs of limited English proficient (LEP) students. According to guidelines from the Office for Civil Rights (U.S. Department of Education, 1992), the test for legal adequacy for a program serving LEP students is whether the adopted strategy works, or promises to work, on the basis of past practice or in the judgment of experts in the field.

    Given the flexibility to decide on the educational approach that best meets the needs of their LEP students, school districts in Ohio use a variety of programs or combination of programs. Approaches used include the following:

    Bilingual Education

    One of the approaches that a school district may adopt to ensure that LEP students receive equal educational opportunity is to provide them with bilingual instruction. This approach can be appropriate for school districts enrolling large numbers of LEP students from specific language backgrounds. In Ohio, several of the larger urban districts use this approach.

    Bilingual education operates on two basic premises: 1) Students are more likely to learn anything, including English, if they understand what they are being taught, and 2) Students who are not proficient in English will not fall behind their English-speaking peers if they are able to continue learning subject matter in their native languages.

    There are a variety of models of bilingual education. In some programs, the students may learn to read first in their native language and then in English. In other programs, LEP students only use their native language orally in the classroom. The focus of the program is on teaching them to read, write and speak English. The important element of bilingual programs is that both the students’ native language and English are used as means of instruction.

    The Immersion Approach

    Another approach to helping LEP students acquire the English skills that they need to be successful in school is the immersion approach. This is an alternative that might be considered especially by those districts where a large number of LEP students reside, but there are not enough of one or more language groups to justify the establishment of bilingual education classrooms.

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    In immersion classrooms, all of the students are LEP students. The focus is on teaching subject matter. Although the students are taught in English, no formal attempt is made to teach the language as an end in itself. The subject matter is introduced in a way that can be understood by the LEP students. The teacher adapts the language of instruction to the level of the students' linguistic and cognitive capabilities. Also, the teacher makes frequent use of visual aids, concrete experiences and manipulative materials. In this approach, students have the opportunity to develop the oral and written language skills they need to make academic progress.

    Pull-out English as a Second Language (ESL) Classes

    School districts may provide ESL instruction to LEP students as a means of helping them acquire the English skills they need to be successful in school. In Ohio, ESL programs are used either as the principal component of the special language instructional program or as a complement to bilingual education. If the ESL class is the main component of the program, it is recommended that, when possible, native language support services be provided to supplement the ESL instruction, at least for students whose English is very limited. For example, bilingual instructional assistants could be hired to work with the regular classroom teacher during the school day, or bilingual volunteers could assist the teacher by clarifying or reinforcing what is being taught.

    ESL classes may focus on teaching formal English grammar or on promoting natural communication activities (free conversation, games, and discussions on certain topics). Reading and writing should be practiced as well as oral communication skills in English.

    In-class or Inclusion Instruction

    In this approach, LEP students are together with their Native-English speaking peers in the same classroom, but an ESL or bilingual education specialist is available in the classroom to support the LEP students. For example, the ESL or bilingual education specialist may provide guidance to the LEP students as they are working on a group project or individual assignment.

    Individual Tutoring

    Another response that might be considered when there are very few LEP students enrolled in a school district is individual or small-group tutoring sessions. Tutors may range from trained professional ESL or bilingual education teachers to volunteers who work under the supervision of specially trained teachers. The tutoring sessions may focus on promoting basic English communication skills or focus on English for academic purposes.

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 20

    The following information is published by Ohio Department of Education. The current revision is dated February 2012. INFORMATION AND GUIDELINES FROM THE LAU RESOURCE CENTER OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Assessment of English Language Learners (including test accommodations) Refer to pages 42-50 of the Ohio Statewide Assessment Program Rules Book, which is available by visiting education.ohio.gov, keyword search: testing rules book. English as a Second Language (ESL) courses for credit at the high school level Refer to the document TESOL Courses for Credit for Students Learning English as a Second Language, which is available by visiting education.ohio.gov, keyword search: About the Lau Resource Center. Grade placement decisions for newly-enrolled English Language Learners Regarding grade placement of newly enrolled English language learners (ELLs), grade decisions are made at the district level based on the district’s evaluation of the students’ academic records and also taking into account the students’ age. The Lau Resource Center does not have any mandates regarding this issue. However, it is recommended that students learning English as a new language be placed in a grade as close as possible to their age peers. The reason for this recommendation is that it is important for students to be placed with age peers to meet their socialization needs. The goal should be to place the student in a grade level that is appropriate for his or her age level, and then provide the additional support needed to address the student’s English language acquisition needs. Grade retention of English Language Learners If an ELL student is retained solely on the basis of his/her lack of English proficiency, such retention would be discriminatory (based on Lau v. Nichols) because in effect, the ELL student would be retained for not having adequate prior exposure to English. So, to justify the retention of an ELL student, the district would need to give evidence that 1) the student has been provided with an educationally sound English language support program, and 2) the student is being retained for reasons other than lack of English proficiency (for example, if the student did not meet grade-level standards due to poor attendance, lack of effort, or poor study habits). Here are some questions that need to be answered before deciding to retain an ELL student:

    • Does the district have a retention policy that takes into account different factors that may impact students’ academic progress?

    • Is the reason for retaining the student other than the student’s lack of English proficiency?

    • Has the student been given meaningful access to the district’s academic program through language support strategies based on sound theory and widely accepted good practice?

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    • Has the student been given academic performance-based assessments that are based on the student’s level of English proficiency, and that take into consideration the instructional strategies used to give the student meaningful access to the academic content?

    • Is the student making less progress than what would be expected of students with similar language background and academic experiences?

    If the answer to all the above questions is “yes,” then the district may consider retention as a possible option for helping the student achieve English proficiency and make academic progress. Of course, the district will need to make sure that in whichever grade the student is placed, an appropriate, comprehensive and research-based language support program is provided. Guidelines for Enrolling Students in Public Schools (including persons with student visas) Refer to the document Guidelines for Enrolling Students in Public Schools, which is available on the About the Lau Resource Center page of education.ohio.gov. Homeschooled students For purposes of determining testing accommodations and service for English Language Learners, experience and time spent in a home education program do NOT count when determining time in a U.S. school. Home education programs are not defined as schools in Ohio law, not even as nonpublic schools. Therefore, “home-schooled” students should be considered as new to U.S. schools when transferring to Ohio public or private schools. They should be able to access testing accommodations allowable to ELL students with three years or less in a U.S. school, regardless of the time they spent in a home education program. Foreign exchange students Identification as Limited English Proficient (LEP) – Guidance It is not mandated that districts formally assess foreign exchange students as potential Limited English Proficient (LEP) students. The assumption is that students selected to participate in foreign-exchange programs in U.S. schools should have sufficient English skills to participate effectively in U.S. mainstream classes. Consequently, and in accordance with federal guidelines on serving foreign-exchange students under No Child Left Behind, districts are not required to assess and serve foreign-exchange students as LEP. However, a district may choose to give an initial English language assessment to foreign-exchange students, especially if the students are struggling in their classes due to limited English proficiency. If the results of the initial English language assessment indicate that a student does in fact have limited English proficiency to the extent in which they are not able to participate effectively in mainstream classes, then the district can identify the student as LEP and provide appropriate English language support. The decision to assess and identify foreign exchange students as LEP should be made for the best interest of the student, and not based merely on accountability consequences. Students who are identified and served as LEP by the district through this process are allowed the appropriate

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    LEP accommodations on the OAA/OGT. Also, foreign exchange students identified as LEP are required to take the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA). On the other hand, if a district chooses not to assess or serve foreign-exchange students as LEP, the foreign-exchange student taking the OGT is not allowed any accommodation (dictionary, extended time, use of a foreign-language CD or English audio CD, or a translator using a translation language script or a test administrator reading the test aloud). Nonpublic school students Refer to the documents Private School Participation in Title III Programs which are available on the U.S. Department of Education website. Preschool English Language Learners This information is published by The Ohio Department of Education. The current revision is dated March 2010. Federal Law defines a Limited English Proficient (LEP) student or English Language Learner (ELL) as a student who is aged 3 through 21 and is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary or secondary school and who is not born in the United States or whose native language is other than English (Refer to Title IX-20 U.S.C. 7801 et seq.). Students may not be denied access to public preschool programs based solely on their home or native language. Ohio school districts serving preschool LEP/ELL students are required to identify LEP/ELL students properly, assess their English language proficiency and provide appropriate language development support. Although districts are required to provide appropriate services in accordance with U.S. Supreme Court case Lau V. Nichols for all school-aged LEP/ELL children, districts do not receive federal supplemental Title III funds under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) for preschool LEP/ELL students. In addition, districts are not subject to accountability requirements under Title III of NCLB for these students. Identification and Assessment To properly identify an LEP/ELL student, Ohio school districts may use the Home Language Survey included in the Guidelines for the Identification and Assessment of Limited English Proficient Students (see page 46 of this document or see Resources on next page). The survey is designed to identify the existence of a heritage language other than English in the student’s home environment. Once the district verifies the existence of a heritage language other than English, it must assess the student to determine the level of English language proficiency using a commercially developed screening assessment, such as those listed in the Guidelines document. Students identified as LEP/ELL in preschool should be reported as such in Ohio’s Education Management Information System (EMIS) and, therefore, do not need to be given an initial screening assessment for LEP/ELL identification in Kindergarten. All kindergarten LEP/ELL students, however, are required to take the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA).

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    Educational Support: ELL Services to Children in Early Childhood Settings Services for Pre-K English Language Learners may include the following: 1. Provide professional development to all staff on research-based strategies for interacting with and teaching ELLs. 2. Provide classroom educational materials in both languages when possible. 3. Provide language development support services in regular classroom environment by an individual who speaks the heritage language when possible. 4. Provide ELL students access to intervention services available in school for additional support. 5. The early childhood administrator and/or teacher should collaborate with K-12 ELL program staff for professional development opportunities and/or classroom support. 6. Arrange for teacher with an endorsement in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) to supervise or oversee language support services provided to preschool ELLs. 7. Involve families in their child’s early school experience by providing opportunities for them to share their skills with staff, children in the program and other families. 8. Provide options for home based activities that can support what children are learning at school. Resources Ohio Department of Education, Lau Resource Center, 614-466-4109, and Office of Early Learning and School Readiness, (614) 466-0224. Guidelines for Identification and Assessment of Limited English Proficient Students Lau v. Nichols Preschool Learning Guide for Families: Preparing for Kindergarten Success (published by the Ohio Department of Education in English, Spanish and Somali). Preschool English Learners, Principles and Practices to Promote Language, Literacy and Learning. A resource guide, Second Edition, California Department of Education, 2009. Preschool Issues Concerning English Language Learners and Immigrant Children: The Importance of Family Engagement, Children Now, Executive Summary, December 2004. Six Research Based Guiding Principles Serving the Needs of English Language Learners in Preschool “School Readiness” Programs, Southern California Comprehensive Assistive Center COE EL Service Providers & COE School Readiness Educators Sept. 30, 2005. Fostering Second Language Development in Young Children, Principles and Practices, by Barry McLaughlin, University of California at Santa Cruz.

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    Pre-School Children’s Help to Second Language Learners by Julie Hirschler. Latino Legislative Hearing on Pre-K & The Early Grades, NALEO Education Leadership Initiative September 2008. PROMOTION AND TRANSFER OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS General district policy regarding the instruction and assessment of ELLs:

    • All ELLs will be provided with an educationally sound English language support program to help them make progress in learning English.

    • All ELLs will be given meaningful access to the district’s academic program through appropriate instructional strategies/modifications based on the students’ level of English proficiency.

    • All ELLs will be given the opportunity to demonstrate what they know and can do in academic content areas through a variety of assessments designed with appropriate accommodations. Accommodations will take into consideration the students’ level of English proficiency and the instructional strategies used to help give them meaningful access to the academic content.

    Note: For resources on instructional and assessment strategies for English Language Learners, refer to the documents Strategies for Diverse Learners and Strategies for Diverse Learners – Focus on English Language Learners, which are available on the Revised Academic Content Standards and Model Curriculum Development page under Model Curriculum Resources. ELLs and grade promotion

    • Assuming that all ELLs have been provided the instructional and assessment support indicated above, those ELLs who have met their district’s and the state’s grade-level standards will be promoted to the subsequent grade.

    • Decisions regarding the promotion of ELLs will not be based solely on the students’ level of English proficiency.

    ELLs and grade transfer

    • Assuming that all ELLs have been provided the instructional and assessment support indicated above, those ELLs who have not met the district’s and state’s grade-level standards may be transferred to the subsequent grade.

    • Decisions regarding the transfer of ELL students to the subsequent grade will be in accordance with the district’s grade-transfer policy for all students.

    • Decisions regarding the transfer of ELLs to the subsequent grade will not be based solely on the students’ levels of English proficiency.

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    Teacher-Student Ratio in Programs Serving ELLs There is no legally prescribed teacher-student ratio for English Language Learner (ELL) students in Ohio. Districts determine the level of language support service based on the needs of ELL students and use state and federal guidelines to meet the educational needs of the students. Guidance from the Lau Resource Center concerning this matter is similar to that provided by the U. S. Office for Civil Rights regarding programs and staff that serve ELLs. That is, districts must develop and implement a language instruction educational program which, in the view of experts in the field, has a reasonable chance for success, and they must ensure that necessary staff, curricular materials and facilities are in place and used properly. So, even though districts have flexibility in ELL program design and the number of staff implementing the program, the district must be able to give evidence that: the program is based on sound theory and good practice; staff are qualified to implement the program; students have access to meaningful educational experiences while in the program; and students are making adequate progress in learning English and achieving Ohio’s content standards. Qualification requirements for teachers providing language support programs for English Language Learners School districts must ensure that teachers have the qualifications necessary to implement the alternative program chosen to assist its English Language Learners (ELL). As evidence of these qualifications, the state of Ohio has established standards for teachers with teaching certification to obtain endorsements in the areas of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and Bilingual Education. Also, the state of Ohio has established standards for obtaining a multi-age license in the teaching fields of TESOL and Bilingual Education. The endorsements and licenses are given following completion of coursework from a university or college with an approved training program. If the district does not have, or cannot find, a teacher with the credentials indicated above, then the district can use a person with a supplemental teaching license for TESOL or Bilingual Education. A person can obtain a supplemental teaching license if he or she holds a standard teaching license in some other area, has completed at least six semester hours of TESOL or Bilingual Education coursework and is hired by a school district to teach TESOL or Bilingual Education. The supplemental license is valid for one year and in order to renew it for a second year, the person needs to pass the Praxis II subject assessment for TESOL and complete an additional six semester hours of TESOL coursework. A person can teach under a supplemental teaching license for a maximum of three years while they are working towards full licensure in the area.

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    The following is published by The Ohio Department of Education. The current revision date is September 2016. The Ohio Statewide Assessment Rules Book will supersede the ELL Resource Manual in the area of statewide testing. OHIO STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT The Ohio Statewide Assessment Rules Book released September 2016 outlines the following. State Test Participation and Accountability Requirements for the English Learner The state test participation and accountability requirements have changed for English learners. The first-year exemption for the English language arts tests has been rescinded. Beginning with the 2016 spring administration, all English learners regardless of time in U.S. schools must take Ohio’s State Tests in all subjects appropriate to grade levels including the English language arts tests. There are no exceptions. The department understands that the English language arts test for most recent arrivals may not be meaningful. However, test results will provide baseline data for intervention supports and will be used in growth determinations. Districts are required to meet the 95 percent participation rate of English language arts and mathematics for the English learner subgroup. English learners who are in U.S. schools for less than two school years (noted in EMIS using code S) will not be included in the proficiency calculation of the English language arts and mathematics tests for Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) purposes but will be included in the participation and graduation requirements. A reminder that all English learners, even those who are recently enrolled, must take the OELPA. Requirements of English Learners for All State Tests All Ohio students must take state tests including ELs whose primary language is not English and whose level of English proficiency is not at the level needed to participate effectively in the mainstream classroom. ELs are required to be taught (with appropriate support) the same academic content in the core subject areas (English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies) as their classmates, at the same time they are learning English. This is to ensure that ELs do not fall behind in any content areas as they are learning English. The state tests include all state diagnostic, 3-8 elementary, high school end-of-course, and Alternate Assessment for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities (AASCD) as well as the OELPA. There is no alternate form of the OELPA; all students identified as EL must take the OELPA, including those ELs with disabilities. A reminder that all ELs, even those who are recently enrolled, must take the OELPA. English Learners and the Third Grade Reading Guarantee All students scoring below the designated level on the third grade ELA must be retained, except specific groups of students which include the EL. ELs who have been enrolled in U.S. schools for less than three full school years and have had less than three years of instruction in an English as a Second Language (ESL) program are exempt from the retention requirement stated in the Third Grade Reading Guarantee. ORC 3313.608(A)(2)

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    Accommodations for the Grades 3-8 and End-of-Course Tests Please refer to the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment Accessibility Manual on the Ohio Department of Education website for information on accommodations. www.education.ohio.gov keyword search: Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment Accessibility Manual. Please note on the English language arts test the student may use an allowable bilingual, word-to-word dictionary. Dictionaries that include definitions, phrases, sentences or pictures are not allowed. The student should be familiar with the dictionary they will use during testing. An electronic translator may be used instead of a paper dictionary. An electronic translator cannot connect to the Internet or store information. The use of a dictionary is recommended for intermediate and advanced English learners but may not be appropriate for beginning level English learners. The English language arts test cannot be translated. Oral translations are not permitted and there is no Spanish/English version. A dictionary is not allowed on the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA).

    http://www.education.ohio.gov/

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    Part II: Granville Exempted Village Schools Implementation STARTING THE IDENTIFICATION PROCESS All parents or guardians of students who plan to attend the Granville Exempted Village School District (GEVSD) for the first time are asked to complete a Student Enrollment Form. This enrollment form includes a Home Language Survey that assists in the identification of students whose primary or home language is other than English (PHLOTE). A copy of all Home Language Surveys will be forwarded to the Director of Student Services for review. In the enrollment process, if a parent or guardian answers on the Home Language Survey “other than English” on any of the first four questions, the Director of Student Services or designee will notify the appropriate ELL Specialist, who is responsible for administering the district’s initial screening, of the student’s need for such an assessment. A copy of the Home Language Survey will be given to the ELL Specialist at the appropriate school. Copies of the Home Language Survey will also be given to the Student Services Department for placement in the ELL file. The original Home Language Survey remains in the student’s cumulative file. THE PROCESS FOR INITIAL ASSESSMENT OR SCREENING OF STUDENTS All new students entering the district (K-12) whose Home Language Survey indicates they have a primary or home language other than English (PHLOTE), will be assessed using McGraw Hill’s Language Assessment System (LAS Links), to determine if they are limited English proficient and need special assistance to participate effectively in the general education curriculum. The LAS Links is an ODE-approved assessment. The LAS Links assessments PreLAS 2000 and LAS-Links measure speaking, listening, reading, and writing for each of the following grade spans: PK, K–1, 2–3, 4–5, 6–8, and 9–12. LAS Links provides a measurement of comprehension skills in academic and social English across each language domain. (For more information regarding the LAS Links, visit their website: www.ctb.com keyword search: LAS Links.) When the Home Language Survey indicates that a child’s home language is not English then the ELL Specialist will contact the parent/guardian(s) to explain that ODE requires school districts to assess students whose home language is not English. The ELL Specialist will also explain when the child will be tested as well as the district’s uses of the assessment(s), prior to the administration of those assessments. The results, consisting of the test documents and written assessment reports, will be kept in the District Student Services office in the student’s ELL file. The district will provide the parent/guardian(s) and the building ELL Specialist copies of the written report and one copy will be placed in the student’s cumulative file. Granville EVSD will provide parents and guardians this information in an understandable format, and to the extent feasible and necessary, in the parent or guardian’s native language.

    http://www.ctb.com/

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    INITIAL CORE TEAM MEETINGS Initial Core Team Meetings must be held within 60 days of initial assessment of a student. The guidelines specify that the following individuals must attend the Initial Core Team Meeting:

    ♠ Parent/Guardian ♠ Director of Student Services or designee ♠ Building ELL Specialist ♠ At least one of the student’s regular education teachers

    The purpose of the Initial Core Team Meeting:

    ♠ To review the results of the assessment, including whether or not the student qualifies for ELL services.

    ♠ If the student qualifies for services, team members will discuss the proposed Individualized English Language Acquisition Plan (IELAP) developed by the ELL Specialist.

    ♠ If the student qualifies for services, written parental permission to begin services must be obtained.

    A copy of the initial core team meeting report will be provided to the parent, kept in the student’s cumulative folder, given to the student’s regular education teachers, and kept with the ELL Specialist. A copy may be given to other school personnel who are involved with the student (e.g., special education teachers and service providers) and need to be aware of the information. The original initial core team meeting report will be sent to the Student Services Department to be placed in the ELL file.

    Once eligibility is established, the IELAP developed, and permission for services obtained from the parent/guardian(s), the child’s ongoing ELL team will consist of:

    ♠ The building ELL Specialist who will be working with the student ♠ A current regular education teacher of the student ♠ The Director of Student Services or designee ♠ The parent/guardian ♠ The student when appropriate.

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    RANGE OF ELL SERVICES PROVIDED IN GRANVILLE EVSD The results of the initial assessment and/or most recent Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA) scores will provide the basis for determining the level of support a child requires to facilitate their transition to English proficiency for success in their regular education classrooms. Our goal is for each student to make progress on the OELPA each year. We understand each student is unique in his/her learning; some students may progress faster than others. The professional judgment of the district ELL team members, along with that of parents will also provide insight into the student’s needs that may not be apparent in the testing results. It is possible for a student to exhibit needs in multiple areas that require different types of interventions and services. A student may be dually identified as a gifted student and an English Language Learner or as a student with a physical, cognitive, or emotional disability and an English Language Learner. If a student is dually identified, they will receive supports in the areas of English language acquisition and other identified area. As mentioned previously, there are no state mandated approaches to providing types of ELL programming; the following chart gives a brief overview of the programming options that Granville EVSD offers to meet the needs of its ELL population.

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    PROGRAMMING OPTIONS

    ELL Support Intensive Tutoring Inclusion Monitoring Type of teacher TESOL endorsed

    or licensed TESOL endorsed or licensed

    TESOL endorsed or licensed

    TESOL endorsed or licensed

    Structure of supports

    Students work individually or in small groups in the ELL classroom

    Students work in small groups in the ELL classroom

    Students are not pulled out of their regular education classroom but the ELL Specialist will be in the identified regular education classroom for a specified time frame to provide support

    Students work in regular education classroom and are not removed.

    Frequency of supports

    Three or more times per week based on the Individualized English Language Acquisition Plan

    Two or three times per week based on the Individualized English Language Acquisition Plan

    Per Individualized English Language Acquisition Plan

    Per Individualized English Language Acquisition Plan

    Initial Assessment Results Classification

    Composite result of “pre-functional” or “beginning”

    Composite result of “intermediate”

    Composite result of “intermediate”

    Composite result of “advanced”

    Recent OELPA results

    Composite score for K-12 of 1

    Composite score for K-12 of 1 or 2

    Composite score for K-12 of 2

    Composite score for K-12 of 3

    Grading Letter grades may be assigned but modified to account for level of language proficiency

    Not modified but certain accommodations made based upon skill deficits

    Not modified but certain accommodations made based upon skill deficits

    No accommodations or modifications

    Accommodations Classwork and homework is modified to the levels of language proficiency

    Accommodations on classwork, homework, and assessments

    Accommodations on classwork, homework, and assessments

    No accommodations or modifications

    Specifically designed supports

    Intensive language instruction, basic & survival vocabulary. ELL Specialist will confer with content area teachers of middle/high school ELL students to discuss the language proficiency.

    Support and direct instruction; the focus may be to address a specific skill deficit related to language acquisition outlined in initial assessment or recent OELPA results

    Intervention to provide support to address a specific skill deficit(s) related to language acquisition outlined in initial assessment or recent OELPA results

    Monitors progress via electronic grade management system (Progress Book), teacher input, and/or grades. May be asked to help other teachers to develop interventions to aid student in making progress in the general education curriculum

    Curriculum General education curriculum and supplemental resources/materials

    General education curriculum and supplemental resources/materials

    General education curriculum

    General education curriculum

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    DOCUMENTATION AND MONITORING OF THE STUDENT’S IELAP PROGRESS Ohio Department of Education guidelines specify that the district must monitor students’ progress on a regular basis and take steps to modify the program if the students are not making reasonable progress. The district monitors a child’s progress and needs in a number of ways. First, once a student has been identified as ELL, an Individual English Language Acquisition Plan (IELAP) will be developed annually by the student’s ELL team. The initial IELAP will be drafted by the building ELL Specialist and presented to the ELL team which includes the parent/guardian(s) at the initial core team meeting. The Plan will be reviewed, discussed, and approved or referred for modification. The ELL Specialist will hold subsequent annual meetings no later than September 30 of the current school year to discuss the IELAP with the student’s ELL team. For the 2016-2017 school year the IELAP will be completed within 30 school days of the district receiving OELPA test results. Once agreed upon by the team and parent/guardian(s), a copy of the IELAP will be provided to the parent, kept in the student’s cumulative folder, given to the regular education teachers, and kept with the ELL Specialist. A copy may be given to other school personnel who are involved with the student and need to be aware of the information. The original IELAP will be sent to the Student Services Department to be placed in the ELL file. Again, a student’s ELL team must consist of the building ELL Specialist who will be working with the student, a current regular education teacher of the student, the Director of Student Services or designee, the parent/guardian, and the student as appropriate. Once an IELAP has been signed by the ELL team, it will be considered the ELL student’s plan for that current school year. Anyone on the ELL team may request that an amendment be made to the plan. A plan may only be amended with documentation demonstrating that the entire ELL team has knowledge of and is in agreement with the proposed changes. Every effort will be made to bring the team, including parent/guardian(s) together to discuss and approve the changes in a single meeting. However, if a meeting cannot be held in a timely manner, the ELL Specialist must secure individual input of parents and team members with accompanying documentation in order for the amendment to be implemented. The district will provide a progress report to the parent/guardian(s) twice a year at the end of each semester. Parents may request an update of progress at any time during the school year. The progress report will focus on the progress the child has made toward the goals outlined on the IELAP. A copy of the progress report will also be kept in their cumulative folder, given to the regular education teachers, and kept with the ELL Specialist. A copy may be given to other school personnel who are involved with the student and need to be aware of the information. The original progress report will be sent to the Student Services Department to be placed in the ELL file. By May 31 of each current school year, an End of Year ELL Core Team Meeting will be held to discuss the overall progress of the student towards the goals of the IELAP, the results of the

  • GEVSD-effective 2016-2017 School Year 33

    current year’s OELPA, and suggested ways parent/guardian(s) can help their child reach full English proficiency. This assumes test results are received by the district by May 15. The meeting will be documented using the End of Year ELL Core Team Meeting Form. All members of the ELL team must be in attendance and are required to sign off that they have participated in the meeting. A copy of the End of Year ELL Core Team Meeting Form will be provided to the parent, the regular education teacher(s), kept in the student’s cumulative folder and with the ELL Specialist. A copy may be given to other school personnel who are involved with the student and need to be aware of the information. The original meeting form will be sent to the Student Services Department to be placed in the ELL file. SOME CLARIFICATION ABOUT ELL PROGRAMMING: ACCOMMODATIONS VS. MODIFICATIONS Accommodations do not reduce learning expectations. They provide access. However, modifications refer to practices that change, lower or reduce learning expectations. Providing modifications to children’s instruction, homework, or assessments may have the unintended consequence of reducing the opportunity to learn critical content. If children have not had access to critical, assessed content, they may be at risk for not meeting graduation requirements. Providing a child with a modification during a state accountability assessment may constitute a test irregularity and may result in an investigation into the school’s or district’s testing practices. All classroom and testing accommodations and modifications will be documented on the IELAP and reviewed annually by the ELL team. The ELL Specialist will document accommodations for state tests using the Personal Needs Profile (PNP).

    Classroom Accommodations ODE guidelines recommend that ELL teams making decisions about instruction accommodations for ELL students should consider the following characteristics for accommodation decisions in the content-based classroom:

    ♠ The child’s current English language proficiency level: based upon initial assessment and/or current OELPA scores.

    ♠ Annual review of the child’s progress toward attaining English language proficiency. ♠ The child’s experience and length of time in U.S. schools. ♠ The primary language of instruction in each content area and length of time the child has

    received instruction in that language. Granville requires that ELL teams must document in the IELAP the information listed above to ensure that each of the characteristics set forth in the ODE guidelines have been considered. The IELAP must clearly indicate the classroom accommodations that will be made and specify in which content areas those accommodations apply. Any accommodations implemented must be consistent with the level of support the student requires and must be reviewed annually at the IELAP meeting. No accommodations can be changed without an amendment to the IELAP as specified in the previous section on Documentation and Monitoring. It is the building ELL Specialist’s responsibility to ensure that

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    the ELL accommodations are provided on a consistent basis and to communicate any accommodation changes to all teachers involved with the ELL student. STATE-WIDE TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS Accommodations for the Grades 3-8 and End-of-Course Tests Please refer to the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment Accessibility Manual on the Ohio Department of Education website for information on accommodations. www.education.ohio.gov keyword search: Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment Accessibility Manual. While all English learners have in common that they are acquiring English language proficiency, they are not a homogenous group. Similar to students with disabilities, English learners should not be assigned accommodations using a one-size-fits-all approach. Knowing the student is key. When considering accommodations for English learners, it is important to focus on the effectiveness of each accommodation for each individual student. Not only does an English Learner’s English language proficiency influence accommodation effectiveness, but so do other factors, including their literacy development in English and their native language, grade, age, affective needs and time in U.S. schools. Keep in mind that the purpose of English language assessment accommodations is not to improve an English learner’s rate of passing state assessments, but to allow more accurate demonstration of their knowledge of the content being assessed. All students who have been identified as an English learner may receive accommodations for English learners even if they do not participate in the district English learner program. Schools should monitor how English learners in the classroom benefit from English learner-specific accommodations when determining accommodations for state tests. Please note on the English language arts test the student may use an allowable bilingual, word-to-word dictionary. Dictionaries that include definitions, phrases, sentences or pictures are not allowed. The student should be familiar with the dictionary they will use during testing. An electronic translator may be used instead of a paper dictionary. An electronic translator cannot connect to the Internet or store information. The use of a dictionary is recommended for intermediate and advanced English learners but may not be appropriate for beginning level English learners. The English language arts test cannot be translated. Oral translations are not permitted and there is no Spanish/English version. A dictionary is not allowed on the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA). DISTRICT-WIDE TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS The Granville EVSD utilizes the Terra Nova and Measured Academic Progress (MAP) as district-wide assessments. The ELL team will decide and document on the IELAP which category and individual accommodations are appropriate for the Terra Nova testing using the information provided by the Terra Nova Assessment Accommodations Supplement. Regarding

    http://www.education.ohio.gov/

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    MAP, Granville Schools will consider all allowable accommodations available to English Learners as outlined by NWEA. GRADING, GRADE RETENTION, PROMOTION, AND TRANSFER The Granville EVSD will ensure the adopted Board of Education Policies are not in conflict with ODE Guidelines regarding the grading systems, grade promotion, retention, or transfer of its ELL student population. SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES

    Career Education Granville EVSD will ensure the adopted Board of Education Policies are not in conflict with ODE Guidelines regarding career education opportunities of its ELL student population. Middle and high school students are invited to tour the career educational facility and are provided information regarding the various program/career opportunities offered at C-TEC (Career & Technology Education Center). Additionally, information regarding career offerings is provided annually to all Granville High School students by the high school guidance counselors.

    International Exchange Students The Granville EVSD will choose to give an initial English language assessment to an international-exchange student if the student is struggling in his/her classes due to limited English proficiency. If the results of the initial English language assessment indicate that the student does in fact have limited English proficiency to the extent to which he/she is not able to participate effectively in mainstream classes, then Granville EVSD will identify the student as ELL and provide appropriate English language support. Students who are identified and served as ELL by the district through this process are allowed the appropriate ELL accommodations on the Ohio State Tests. Also, international exchange students identified as ELL are required to take the Ohio English Language Proficiency Assessment (OELPA). Home-Schooled Students When a home-schooled student is enrolling or returning to attend a Granville school, the same procedures will be followed regarding initial screening and assessment as outlined previously. If a home-schooled student is participating in state-wide assessments, his/her parent or guardian will be required to inform the District Testing Coordinator of any accommodation concerns regarding English Language Learner needs. Granville will need to complete the LAS-Links assessment to determine qualification as an ELL student and develop accommodations accordingly.

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    Non-Public Schools An annual meeting will be held with each chartered private school in the Granville EVSD. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss participation and use of Title III funds. Any chartered private school that chooses to participate in Title III funds will be afforded all educational services required by Title III. However, an ELL student enrolled in a private school participating in Title III funds may not necessarily receive all supports and services afforded to ELL students enrolled in Granville EVSD. Preschool English Language Learners The Granville EVSD will assess ELL preschool students and work with families to develop a service plan for the child. STUDENT SERVICES Gifted and Talented Program ELL students are eligible for placement in Granville EVSD’s gifted and talented program regardless of their proficiency in English. All ELL students are included in the assessment process. Assessment tools used to identify gifted and talented students may be furnished in the child’s native language if deemed necessary. Special Education Limited English proficiency is not a learning disability. However, some students may have a learning disability in addition to being limited English proficient. If a child is diagnosed as having a learning disability, he or she will be provided instruction consistent with an Individualized Education Plan developed in collaboration with parent/guardian(s), the child’s teachers and other specialists. ELL program students may be identified for special education placement if they meet the following criteria:

    1. The student must have been in the school district or in another school in the United States for a period of at least one year. (Exceptions-students with observable physical and/or mental disabilities or students who enroll in the district with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) from another school district)

    2. A m