Employee Motivation Research Project

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Transcript of Employee Motivation Research Project

Employee Motivation and its Most Influential Factors Prepared for: Professor Mary Groves University of Nevada, Reno Prepared by: Randall E. Berkson Ross W. Martin Brandon V. Smith Jordan M. Worley 12/13/2012

To: From:

Mary Groves Randall E. Berkson Ross W. Martin Brandon V. Smith Jordan M. Worley December 13, 2011 Report on Employee Motivation

Date: Subject:

Here is the report on employee motivation you requested. It is titled Employee Motivation and its Most Influential Factors. This report outlines the methods used in the study to gather data about the various factors that influence employee motivation and how to better motivate the companys employees in the future.

Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................................................................... 1 SECTION I ............................................................................................................................................................. 4 INTRODUCTION INTO THE STUDY ......................................................................................................................... 4 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................................. 4 STATEMENT OF PROBLEM ................................................................................................................................................ 4 SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY ............................................................................................................................................ 4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY ...................................................................................................................................................... 5 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE ...................................................................................................................................... 5 METHODS OF THE STUDY ................................................................................................................................................. 6 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY ................................................................................................................................ 7 SECTION II ............................................................................................................................................................ 8 FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS ......................................................................................... 8 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................................. 8 FINDINGS ..................................................................................................................................................................... 8 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE .................................................................................................................................................. 8 COMMUNICATION IN THE WORKPLACE ............................................................................................................................... 9 INCOME OF EMPLOYEES .................................................................................................................................................. 9 LONG-TERM INCENTIVES ............................................................................................................................................... 10 NON-FINANCIAL INCENTIVES .......................................................................................................................................... 11 CONCLUSIONS ............................................................................................................................................................. 12 RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 13 WORKS CITED .................................................................................................................................................... 14 APPENDIX A: EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION QUESTIONNAIRE ................................................................................... 15 APPENDIX B: DATA ANALYSIS TABLES AND FIGURES ........................................................................................ 19 APPENDIX C: PRESENTATION OUTLINE ............................................................................................................... 21 APPENDIX D: POWER POINT SLIDES ................................................................................................................... 23

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List of TablesTable 1: Rankings of Incentives..11 Table 2: Pearson Correlations.19 Table 3: Part III Results - Rating Averages....20 Table 4: Part III Results Rating Averages for Low-Income Employees..20 Table 5: Part III Results Rating Averages for High-Income Employees.20 Table 6: Part IV, Questions 1 & 2...20

List of Figures

Figure 1: Age Distribution of Respondents.....8

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Executive Summary

IntroductionThis study was executed in order to measure the employees current satisfaction of motivational factors and incentives in the company, as well as to use that information to determine which factors and incentives could be changed, implemented, or eliminated in order to motivate them to do their best work in the future. The study was conducted by issuing a questionnaire to all employees working at the company headquarters in Reno. The employees that participated were both full-time and part-time, from all different departments, and have been working at the company for varied periods of time. The questionnaire was split into four different parts, and the data derived from the questionnaire was analyzed and presented in this report in four criteria: communication in the workplace, income of employees, long-term incentives, and non-financial incentives.

FindingsDemographic Profile The respondents of the questionnaire were 53.33% male and 46.67% female. The company has a very young workforce, with 75% of the sample respondents being 33 years of age or younger. According to the questionnaire data, 65% of the respondents make less than $30,000 per year. Nearly 70% of the employees work 40 hours or less per week, and more that 75% of the respondents are single. Communication in the Workplace According to the study, 48.33% of the employees believe that improvements can be made to the communication within the company. In regard to employee-manager interactions, 30% of the respondents believe their manager or boss does not communicate with them enough, although the study showed a generally positive opinion of the companys managers and their management styles. The correlation between good communication and high motivation are strong, according to the Pearson Correlation that was run for the two factors. Income in the Workplace The 65% of respondents that make less than $30,000 per year rated Management Support and Company Emphasis on Incentives and Creativity lower on the 1 (strongly disagree) to 6 (strongly agree) point scale than did the respondents making $30,000 per year or over, by rating various statements in Part III of the questionnaire comprising the overall Management and1

Company categories. The low-income segment also rated three out of four motivational factors (gaining proficiency at their job, financial incentives, and achieving recognition, credit, and acclaim) as more motivating than the high-income segment did. Long-Term Incentives When ranking which incentives were most motivating to them, employees in the sample selected a long-term incentive as their number 2 choice out of a possible 8, which was the opportunity for promotion at the company. There was a moderate correlation between the existence of longterm incentives, such as promotion, and the level of motivation an employee had toward their current job. It was found that short-term incentives may possibly be detrimental to motivation when 55% of employees noted that when they are presented with a short term project, that they are very likely to use past methods to complete it instead of innovative new ones. Non-Financial Incentives Employees in the sample chose Pay (salary/wage) as their most motivating incentive, with Benefits, Flexibility, and Recognition placing 3rd, 4th, and 5th, respectively. Flexibility and Recognition are non-financial incentives that ranked higher than Performance Bonuses and Tuition Reimbursement, which are financial incentives. However, it was found that Company Parties and Socials were ranked last (8th) as a motivating incentive. Based on the information received from Part III of the questionnaire (the rating section), pure financial incentives actually ranked 3rd-most motivating, behind gaining proficiency and job mastering (1st), as well as seeing the impact their work has on the company and others (2nd).

ConclusionsEmployees at the company want better communication with their immediate managers and the company as a whole. They want to know how they are doing, what to improve on, and what they are good at. With 55% of the respondents only somewhat motivated at their current positions and many believing the quality of communication at the company is insufficient, it is very rational to believe that an increase in communication quality will lead to an increase in overall employee motivation. The research and findings illustrate that competitive wages are a strong motiv