emotional quotient

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Transcript of emotional quotient

  • 1. TABLE OF CONTENTS SR. NO PARTICULARS SUB TOPIC PAGE NO. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1) HISTORICAL ROOTS OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE 1.2) EMOTIONAL NORMS [TABLE] 4-7 2 NEED AND IMPORTANCE NEED 2.1) WHAT IS EQ AND IQ? 2.2)ROLE OF EMOTION 2.3) EMOTIONAL PROCESSING 2.4) TYPES OF EMOTIONS IMPORTANCE 2.5)EI VERSUS IQ WORKPLACE PERFORMANCE 2.6) EI LEADERSHIP, CLIMATE, AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE 2.7) PROFILE OF INDIAN EXECUTIVES [E I] 8-16 3 CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE APPLICATION 3.1)FRAMEWORK OF EMOTIONAL COMPETENCIES 3.2) EMOTIONAL COMPETENCIES 17-23 4 MEASURING E I 4.1) MEANING OF E I 4.2) BUILDING E I OF GROUPS 4.3) BAR-ON MODEL OF E I 4.4) SIGNS OF HIGH AND LOW EQ 4.5) MINI EMOTIONAL TEST 4.6) HOW TO RAISE E I 24-38 METHODOLOGY 5.1) DATA COLLECTION SAMPLE 39-40 - 1

2. 5 6 EI AT THE WORKPLACE 6.1)TYPES OF LEARNING 6.2) INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOUR CURVE [ KUBLER ROSS CHANGE CURVE] 6.3) GUIDELINES FOR EFFECTIVE SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING 41-46 7 USES 7.1) EQ USEFULNESS IN MODERN HR PRACTICES 47-48 8 OBJECTIVES 49 9 TOOLS 49 10 CASE STUDY 10.1) INTERVIEW 10.2) BUSSINESS CASE FOR EI 49-55 11 RECOMMENDATIONS 56 12 SUPPLEMENTARY 12.1) ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 57 13 CONCLUSION 58 14 BIBLIOGRAPHY 59 - 2 3. PREFACE The world has been moving from a manufacturing economy to a value-added, service- oriented economy. And at the heart of service are relationships: interpersonal relationships, inter- group relationships, and interdepartmental relationships. The ascendance of work teams in large organizations put a new premium on relationship team skills. There is a growing importance of finding, hiring, training, and retaining leaders with high emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is defined as a persons self-awareness, self- confidence, self-control, commitment and integrity, and a persons ability to communicate, influence, initiate change and accept change. Studies have shown that emotional intelligence impacts a leaders ability to be effective. Three of the most important aspects of emotional intelligence for a leaders ability to make effective decisions are self-awareness, communication and influence, and commitment and integrity. Managers who do not develop their emotional intelligence have difficulty in building good relationships with peers, subordinates, superiors and clients. The above two paragraphs show the significance of emotional intelligence and initiate a need to implement it into every organization. But enough Organizational Support has to be secured to see some Emotional intelligence efforts, which forms a crucial part in the entire functioning. Finally, Emotional intelligence contributes to the bottom line in any work organization and hence needs paramount attention. - 3 4. 1 ] INTRODUCTION Ever since the publication of Daniel Golemans first book on the topic in 1995, emotional intelligence has become one of the hottest buzzwords in the corporate world. For instance, when the Harvard Business Review published an article on the topic two years ago, it attracted a higher percentage of readers than any other article published in that periodical in the last 40 years. When the CEO of Johnson & Johnson read that article, he was so impressed that he had copies sent out to the 400 top executives in the company worldwide. Given that emotional intelligence is so popular in the corporate world, it is important to understand what it really means. Thus briefly laying out the history of the concept as an area of research and describing how it has come to be defined and measured. So lets begin with some history. Education is the ability to meet lifes situation. It is a character-building process. Enhancing ones personality and making him/her rational, capable, responsive and intelligently independent, it generates the will to refashion ones heart, head and life. But does education make a person emotionally independent? Todays curriculum aims at all round formation, training and development of students. But does the curriculum include the training to make students emotionally mature? These are crucial questions to answer, which we need to shift our attention to the emotional aspects of students for full, complete and wholistic formation of students. Emotion The word emotion comes from Latin word motere, which means to move. The Oxford English Dictionary defines emotion as any agitation or disturbance of mind, feeling, passion any vehement or excited mental state. Emotions refer to motions, movements feelings etc. Every emotion has an impulse to act. They are also complex and contagious, e.g. anger, sadness, fear, enjoyment, love, disgust, shame etc. All our emotions usually depend on the information our - 4 5. senses grasp. And so emotion is said to be primarily a psychic reaction to stimuli from the word around us. Feelings All emotions are feelings. But not all feelings are emotions. Feelings that are not emotion includes pain, hunger, thirst, cold, warmth, fatigue, tension, relaxation etc. Feelings have the origin in our body. They alert our bodily conditions and needs. A large number of course, varieties of exercise are offered to cope up artfully and carefully as every human being is expected to rise above ones feelings and emotion. 1.1) HISTORICAL ROOTS OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE When psychologists began to write and think about intelligence, they focused on cognitive aspects, such as memory and problem-solving. However, there were researchers who recognized early on that the non-cognitive aspects were also important. For instance, David Wechsler defined intelligence as the aggregate or global capacity of the individual to act purposefully, to think rationally, and to deal effectively with his environment. As early as 1940 he referred to non-intellective as well as intellective elements, by which he meant affective, personal, and social factors. Furthermore, as early as 1943, Wechsler was proposing that the non-intellective abilities are essential for predicting ones ability to succeed in life. He wrote: The main question is whether non-intellective, that is affective and cognitive abilities, are admissible as factors of general intelligence. (My contention) has been that such factors are not only admissible but necessary. I have tried to show that in addition to intellective there are also definite non-intellective factors that determine intelligent behavior. If the foregoing observations are correct, it follows that we cannot expect to measure total intelligence until our tests also include some measures of the non-intellective factors. Wechsler was not the only researcher who saw non-cognitive aspects of intelligence to be important for adaptation and success. Robert Thorndike, to take another example, was writing - 5 6. about social intelligence in the late thirties. Unfortunately, the work of these early pioneers was largely forgotten or overlooked until 1983 when Howard Gardner began to write about multiple intelligence. Gardner proposed that intrapersonal and interpersonal intelligences are as important as the type of intelligence typically measured by IQ and related tests. Other strands of research and theory could be cited, but it is clear that by the early 1990s, there was a long tradition of research on the role of non-cognitive factors in the helping people to succeed in both life and the workplace. The current work on emotional intelligence builds on this foundation. - 6 7. 2] NEED AND IMPORTANCE : - Individual Group Cross-Boundary Norms That Create Awareness of Emotions Interpersonal Undertaking 1. Take time away from group tasks to get to know one another. 2. Have a check in at the beginning of the meeting-that is, ask how everyone is doing. 3. Assume that undesirable behavior takes place for a reason. Find out what that reason is. Ask questions and listen. Avoid negative attributions. 4. Tell your teammates what youre thinking and how youre feeling. Perspective Taking 1. Ask whether everyone agrees with a decision. 2. Ask quiet members what they think. 3. Question decisions that come too quickly. 4. Appoint a devils advocate. Team self-Evaluation 1. Schedule time to examine team effectiveness. 2. Create measurable task and process objectives and then measure them. 3. Acknowledge and discuss group moods. 4. Communicate your sense of what is transpiring in the team. 5. Allow members to call a process check. (for instance, a team member might say, Process check: is this the most effective use of our time right now?) Seeking Feedback 1. Ask your customers how you are doing. 2. Post your work and invite comments. 3. Benchmark your process. Organizational Understanding 1. Find out the concerns and needs of others in the organization. 2. Consider who can influence the teams ability to accomplish its goals. 3. Discuss the culture and politics in the organization. 4. Ask whether proposed team actions are congruent with the organizations culture and politics. Norms That Help Regular Emotions Confronting 1. Set ground rules and use them to point out errant behavior. 2. Call members on errant behavior. 3. Create playful devices for pointing out such behavior. These often emerge from the group spontaneously reinforce them. Caring 1. Support members: volunteer to help them if they need it, be flexible, and provide emotional support. 2. Validate members contributions. Let members know they are valued. 3. Protect members from attack. 4. Respect individuality and difference in perspectives. Listen. 5. Never be derogatory or demeaning. Creating Resources for Working with Emotion 1. Make time to discuss difficult issues, and address the emotions that surround them. 2. Find creative, shorthand ways to acknowledge and express the emotion in the group. 3. Create fun ways to acknowledge and relieve stress and tension. 4. Express acceptance of members emotions. Creating on Affirmative Environment 1. Reinforce that the team can meet a challenge. Be optimistic. For example say things like, We