Editing Part One and Two

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Here are both of the editing lectures in one powerpoint. It may be different from the in-class lecture but the information is the same.

Transcript of Editing Part One and Two

  • 1. Editing

2. CUT 3. CUT Is the joining of two separate shots 4. CUT Is the joining of two separate shots So that the first shot is instantaneously replaced by the second 5. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING 6. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING MID 1890s 7. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING MID 1890s - Lumiere Brothers invented the Cinematograph 8. Lumiere Bros. Cinematograph: camera, projector, developing machine 9. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING MID 1890s - Lumiere Brothers invented the Cinematograph - Lumiere Bros. (Auguste & Louis) early films contained no editing 10. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING MID 1890s - Lumiere Brothers invented the Cinematograph - Lumiere Bros. (Auguste & Louis) early films contained no editing - Single-shot recordings (sequence shots) 11. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING MID 1890s - Lumiere Brothers invented the Cinematograph - Lumiere Bros. (Auguste & Louis) early films contained no editing - Single-shot recordings (sequence shots) - Lasted the duration of one roll of film (1-2 minutes) 12. HISTORICAL AND AESTHETIC DEVELOPMENTS IN EDITING MID 1890s - Lumiere Brothers invented the Cinematograph - Lumiere Bros. (Auguste & Louis) early films contained no editing - Single-shot recordings (sequence shots) - Lasted the duration of one roll of film (1-2 minutes) -The duration of the shots and the event were equal 13. George Melies created episodic films by connecting shots: cutting to continuity 14. George Melies created episodic films by connecting shots: cutting to continuity - Editing and camera placement still based on live theatre 15. George Melies created episodic films by connecting shots: cutting to continuity - Editing and camera placement still based on live theatre - Camera is stationary, outside of the action 16. George Melies created episodic films by connecting shots: cutting to continuity - Editing and camera placement still based on live theatre - Camera is stationary, outside of the action -Similar to curtain coming down and opening in a new location 17. Continuity cutting tries to preserve the fluidity of an event without literally showing all of it (Giannetti) 18. 1903 -Edwin S. Porter made Life of an American Fireman and The Great Train Robbery 19. 1903 -Edwin S. Porter made Life of an American Fireman and The Great Train Robbery - Porter used editing to create parallel action 20. 1903 -Edwin S. Porter made Life of an American Fireman and The Great Train Robbery - Porter used editing to create parallel action - Shots are not linear - shot B does not pick up where shot A left off linked instead by the continuity of an IDEA The Great Train Robbery (1903), Edwin S. Porter 21. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking - D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation 22. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting 23. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting -Editing within scene to vary dramatic intensity 24. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting -Editing within scene to vary dramatic intensity -Expand visual explanation- 25. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting -Editing within scene to vary dramatic intensity -Expand visual explanation- -juxtaposing long shots, 26. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting -Editing within scene to vary dramatic intensity -Expand visual explanation- -juxtaposing long shots, -medium shots, close ups, etc. 27. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting -Editing within scene to vary dramatic intensity -Expand visual explanation- -juxtaposing long shots, -medium shots, close ups, etc. - varying the length of shots 28. 1915 The Father of Filmmaking -D. W. Griffith makes The Birth of a Nation -Classical cutting -Editing within scene to vary dramatic intensity -Expand visual explanation- -juxtaposing long shots, -medium shots, close ups, etc. - varying the length of shots -shifting the attention within a scene 29. CONTINUITY EDITING: 30. CONTINUITY EDITING: Designed to make editing INVISIBLE 31. CONTINUITY EDITING: Designed to make editing INVISIBLE - cutting on action: action begins in one shot and ends in another 32. CONTINUITY EDITING: Designed to make editing INVISIBLE - cutting on action: action begins in one shot and ends in another - cutting on dialogue: motivated by whoever is talking (or listening) 33. CONTINUITY EDITING: Designed to make editing INVISIBLE - cutting on action: action begins in one shot and ends in another - cutting on dialogue: motivated by whoever is talking (or listening) - cut on the glance: edit follows the eyes of a character 34. CONTINUITY EDITING: Master shot: A long shot of the entire action without cuts. 35. CONTINUITY EDITING: Master shot: A long shot of the entire action without cuts. The action is then repeated a number to times using medium shots, close ups, etc. 36. CONTINUITY EDITING: Master shot: A long shot of the entire action without cuts. The action is then repeated a number to times using medium shots, close ups, etc. Without a master shot editors many not have adequate footage 37. This end the 1st part of the editing lecture The slides after this will be covered in the second week of editing. 38. The Russians *scene 6 39. Moscow Film School used film as propaganda 40. Moscow Film School used film as propaganda Their editing style was in direct opposition to American classical cutting 41. Moscow Film School used film as propaganda Their editing style was in direct opposition to American classical cutting Soviets believed that the power was in the juxtaposition 42. Moscow Film School used film as propaganda Their editing style was in direct opposition to American classical cutting Soviets believed that the power was in the juxtaposition Cuts called attention to themselves 43. Moscow Film School used film as propaganda Their editing style was in direct opposition to American classical cutting Soviets believed that the power was in the juxtaposition Cuts called attention to themselves The meaning was made in the edit 44. 1920s - Lev Kuleshov, Soviet film theorist 45. 1920s - Lev Kuleshov, Soviet film theorist - Experimented with juxtaposition 46. 1920s - Lev Kuleshov, Soviet film theorist - Experimented with juxtaposition - Shots cut together to create ideas not contained in either shot on its own = meaning through editing 47. 1920s - Lev Kuleshov, Soviet film theorist - Experimented with juxtaposition - Shots cut together to create ideas not contained in either shot on its own = meaning through editing MONTAGE EDITING 48. MONTAGE EDITING Sergei EisensteinSergei Eisenstein - shots COLLIDE to make meaning 49. MONTAGE EDITING Sergei Eisenstein - shots COLLIDE to make meaning -often fragmenting time and space 50. MONTAGE EDITING Sergei Eisenstein - shots COLLIDE to make meaning -often fragmenting time and space - montage calls attention to itself, unlike Continuity editing -the contrast and conflict of images 51. Montage clip from Eisensteins STRIKE (1925): 52. SHORT ATTENTION SPAN: MTV/30 SEC. COMMERCIAL INFLUENCES 53. SHORT ATTENTION SPAN: MTV/30 SEC. COMMERCIAL INFLUENCES - MTV Generation - grew up watching 30 second TV commercials, and rapidly-edited music videos 54. SHORT ATTENTION SPAN: MTV/30 SEC. COMMERCIAL INFLUENCES - MTV Generation - grew up watching 30 second TV commercials, and rapidly-edited music videos - Shots often last a second or two (or less) 55. Tsotsi (2005) Directed by Gavin Hood Presley Chweneyagae .... Tsotsi