Ed Verosky’s GUIDE TO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY ... Introduction Ed Verosky’s Guide to Flash...

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Transcript of Ed Verosky’s GUIDE TO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY ... Introduction Ed Verosky’s Guide to Flash...

  • Ed Verosky

    FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY

    Ed Verosky’s GUIDE TO

  • Ed Verosky’s Guide to Flash Photography. Copyright 2015 Edward Verosky. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission, in writing from the author/ publisher.

    Learn more about Photography at edverosky.com

    https://edverosky.com

  • Contents About Light ............................................................................................ 5 Duration of Light .........................................................................................................6 Constant & Flash Lighting ..........................................................................................6 Light Travels in Straight Paths .....................................................................................7 Light Scatters...............................................................................................................7 The Relative Size of Your Light Affects Contrast ........................................................8 Direct & Diffuse Light ..................................................................................................9 Color of Light ............................................................................................................10 Light Loses Intensity as it Travels.............................................................................. 11

    Camera & Exposure ............................................................................ 12 How We Measure Light .............................................................................................13 APERTURE, SHUTTER SPEED, AND ISO ..............................................................14 Shooting Modes.........................................................................................................23 Easy Adjustments With Two Simple Exposure Controls ............................................26 Standardization..........................................................................................................29 Manual Camera & Flash ............................................................................................34

    Flash Gear & Concepts ........................................................................ 37 Shoe-Mount Flash .....................................................................................................38 Flash Units by Manufacturer......................................................................................38 Budget Flash Units ....................................................................................................40 Remote Flash Triggering ...........................................................................................41 Light Stands...............................................................................................................43 Light Meters ...............................................................................................................48 Two Types Of Metering ..............................................................................................48 Using A Light Meter ...................................................................................................48 The Meter Is Accurate, Not Perfect ...........................................................................50 Are Lighting Ratios Important? ..................................................................................50

    On-Camera Flash ................................................................................. 51 TTL for Camera-mounted Flash ................................................................................52 Flash Exposure Compensation .................................................................................52 Other Flash Features.................................................................................................53 Straight-On Flash ......................................................................................................54 Bounce Flash ............................................................................................................55

    Off-Camera Flash ................................................................................. 58 The Advantages of Small Flash Units For Off-Camera Lighting ................................59 Building a Portable Studio .........................................................................................59 lighting setups & Techniques .....................................................................................64

    Portraiture Tips .................................................................................... 80 Lighting For Faces ....................................................................................................81 The Five Basic Lighting Patterns ...............................................................................81 Flat vs. Dimensional Lighting ....................................................................................84

  • Introduction Ed Verosky’s Guide to Flash Photography is a compilation of my best flash instruction from books and tutorials over the last several years and a follow-up to my eBook, 100% Reliable Flash Photography which was originally written in 2010. Much of the information has been reworked and updated to present a clearer picture of my methodology.

    My goal is to give you a complete foundational understanding of how light and flash work so that you can produce great flash photography quickly and easily, no matter what the circumstances. I recommend that you read through this guide from beginning to end. I’ve made an effort to present the material in a way that doesn’t waste your time, while it gives you every opportunity to learn and master your technique. Depending on your skill level and familiarity with topics like camera settings and exposure, you might have to spend a little more time with certain sections, but stick to it. It will pay off big as time goes on.

    We start by covering the behavior of light. This is an important topic; understanding how light works is the key to addressing some of the basic challenges you’ll come across in most lighting situations.

    Camera and exposure settings are discussed next. As important as those topics are, that chapter has a section that I want you to pay particular attention to: Standardization. It’s the key to being able to walk into any environment with complete confidence in your technical abilities. Indoor, out- door, day or night with a single portraiture subject, group, or in a fast-moving environment. There is no reason for you to have to struggle with camera settings and lighting gear. Essentially, what Stan- dardization is about is creating and using an ultra-simplified starting point for just about any environ- ment you’ll encounter. Two default setting combinations is all most people need!

    We finish up with the most common and powerful techniques for flash photography. I could have made this part of the book more complicated, and come up with ten or twenty scenarios and provided specific gear and settings recommendations for each. But I decided to offer a different, more practi- cal approach; I realized it would make more sense to show you how to do the things most photogra- phers need to do with flash. My reasoning is that if I can teach you how to build up from a one-light scenario to a three-point (or more) lighting setup, then you should be able to handle just about every- thing else that comes your way.

    Finally, some basic portraiture tips are provided in Chapter Six. I’ve added this for completeness because learning to use your flashes AND knowing what makes a good portrait go hand-in-hand.

    I really hope you enjoy Ed Verosky’s Guide to Flash Photography. I know that if you take the time to read it, apply the principles presented, and practice, you will become an expert in flash photography.

    Ed Verosky

  • 5

    About Light

    CHAPTER ONE

  • 6

    Understanding how light works is the first step to mastering your flash photography. You should know the effects of light’s behavior, color, power and duration. In this chapter, we’ll cover several important characteristics of light as they relate to photography. This is where it all starts.

    Duration of Light In still photography, the duration of the light in our scene is one of our major concerns. This is because duration is very closely linked to exposure. The reason for that? The sensor will record more light as the duration of that light increases. Not enough exposure time and the picture will be too dark. Too much exposure to light, and you’ll get an overexposed image.

    We can control the duration and/or amount of light reaching the sensor with our camera settings, but let’s start by understanding what types of light we’re working with in the first place. Where du- ration is concerned, photographers work with two main types of light sources: constant and flash.

    Constant & Flash Lighting Constant light is light that persists for a duration exceeding the time of the average exposure. Examples of this type of light source are photographic “hot lights,” household lighting, street lights, candle light, and sunlight (often referred to as natural light). Ambient light (light that exists in a scene but is not necessarily a primary light source) is also part of the constant light mix. One of the great advantages to working with constant lig