DYSLEXIA OVERVIEW Kathleen Rotter, Ed.D.. TCNJ Dyslexia Initiative.

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Transcript of DYSLEXIA OVERVIEW Kathleen Rotter, Ed.D.. TCNJ Dyslexia Initiative.

Dyslexia OverviewKathleen Rotter, Ed.D. 1TCNJ Dyslexia InitiativeFor further information and updates on our offerings, please visit our website at dyslexiacenter.pages.tcnj.edu

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Is dyslexia a dirty word?CHAPTER 131AN ACT concerning special education and supplementing chapter 46 of Title 18A of the New Jersey Statutes.BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:C.18A:46-55 Regulations incorporating definition of dyslexia.1. The State Board of Education shall promulgate regulations that incorporate the International Dyslexia Associations definition of dyslexia into chapter 14 of Title 6A of the New Jersey Administrative Code.2. This act shall take effect immediately.Approved August 9, 2013. CHAPTER 105AN ACT concerning professional development for public school employees andsupplementing chapter 6 of Title 18A of the New Jersey Statutes.BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:C.18A:6-130 Professional development opportunities related to reading disabilities.1. The Department of Education shall provide professional development opportunitiesrelated to reading disabilities, including dyslexia, to school district personnel. Theprofessional development shall be made available to general education, special education,basic skills, and English as a second language teachers, instructional support staff,administrators, supervisors, child study team members, and speech-language specialists. Theprofessional development opportunities shall be designed to account for the various mannersin which different school district personnel interact with, or develop instructional programsfor, students with reading disabilities.

C.18A:6-131 Required instruction.

2. The State Board of Education shall, as part of the professional developmentrequirement established by the State board for public school teaching staff members, require certain teaching staff members to annually complete at least two hours of professional development instruction on the screening, intervention, accommodation, and use of technology for students with reading disabilities, including dyslexia. The professional development requirement established pursuant to this section shall apply to general education teachers employed in grades kindergarten through 3, special education, basic skills, and English as a second language teachers, reading specialists, learning disabilities teacher consultants, and speech-language specialists. A board of education may make the professional development opportunities available to other instructional or support staff as the board deems appropriate.3. This act shall take effect immediately and shall first be applicable to the first fullschool year beginning after the effective date of this act.Approved August 7, 2013.CHAPTER 210AN ACT concerning reading disabilities among public school students and supplementingchapter 40 of Title 18A of the New Jersey Statutes.BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:C.18A:40-5.1 Definitions relative to reading disabilities.As used in this act:Potential indicators of dyslexia or other reading disabilities means indicators that include, but shall not be limited to, difficulty in acquiring language skills; inability to comprehend oral or written language; difficulty in rhyming words; difficulty in naming letters, recognizing letters, matching letters to sounds, and blending sounds when speaking and reading words; difficulty recognizing and remembering sight words; consistent transposition of number sequences, letter reversals, inversions, and substitutions; and trouble in replication of content.C.18A:40-5.2 Distribution of information on screening instruments.2. a. The Commissioner of Education shall distribute to each board of educationinformation on screening instruments available to identify students who possess one or morepotential indicators of dyslexia or other reading disabilities pursuant to section 3 of this act.The commissioner shall provide information on the screening instruments appropriate for kindergarten through second grade students and on screening instruments that may be suitably used for older students. A board of education shall select and implement age appropriate screening instruments for the early diagnosis of dyslexia and other readingdisabilities.b. The commissioner shall develop and distribute to each board of education guidanceon appropriate intervention strategies for students diagnosed with dyslexia or other readingdisabilities.C.18A:40-5.3 Screening for dyslexia, other reading disabilities.3. a. A board of education shall ensure that each student enrolled in the school districtwho has exhibited one or more potential indicators of dyslexia or other reading disabilities is screened for dyslexia and other reading disabilities using a screening instrument selected pursuant to section 2 of this act no later than the students completion of the first semester of the second grade.b. In the event that a student who would have been enrolled in kindergarten or grade one or two during or after the 2014-2015 school year enrolls in the district in kindergarten or grades one through six during or after the 2015-2016 school year and has no record of being previously screened for dyslexia or other reading disabilities pursuant to this act, the board of education shall ensure that the newly-enrolled student is screened for dyslexia and other reading disabilities using a screening instrument selected pursuant to section 2 of this act at the same time other students enrolled in the students grade are screened for dyslexia and other reading disabilities or, if other students enrolled in the students grade have previously been screened, within 90 calendar days of the date the student is enrolled in the district.c. The screening shall be administered by a teacher or other teaching staff memberproperly trained in the screening process for dyslexia and other reading disabilities.C.18A:40-5.4 Comprehensive assessment for the learning disorder.P.L.2013, CHAPTER 2104. In the event that a student is determined through the screening conducted pursuant to section 3 of this act to possess one or more potential indicators of dyslexia or other reading disabilities, the board of education shall ensure that the student receives a comprehensive assessment for the learning disorder. In the event that a diagnosis of dyslexia or other reading disability is confirmed by the comprehensive assessment, the board of education shall provide appropriate evidence-based intervention strategies to the student, including intense instruction on phonemic awareness, phonics and fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.5. This act shall take effect immediately and shall first apply to the 2014-2015 schoolyear; provided, however, that the Commissioner of Education shall take any anticipatoryactions that the commissioner determines to be necessary and appropriate to effectuate thepurposes of this act prior to the 2014-2015 school year.Approved January 17, 2014.Lets take a quiz! Most SWD are male.Most SWD will never learn to read.Most SWD are artistic.Dyslexia runs in families.There is a single dyslexia gene.Dyslexia can be cured.The main difficulty in dyslexia is reversals.SWD experience more fatigue in school.Dyslexia doesnt exist in other languages like Chinese when it uses pictographs.Most SWD are good at sports.Most SWD are creative.SWD read slowly and laboriously.Most SWD have high IQs.Most SWD come from middle to upper middle class families.Its best practice to assess children for dyslexia in second grade. SWD have working memory issues.If you perform well in school, you cant be dyslexic.Dyslexia is a visual problem.Dyslexia can be outgrown.Every child who is significantly deficit in reading has dyslexia.Lets play! Q = d or tZ = mP = bB = pYs = erA(bat) = e (pet)E(pet) = a (bat)We pegin our qrib eq a faziliar blace, a poqy like yours enq zine.Iq conqains a hunqraq qrillion calls qheq work qogaqhys py qasign.Enq wiqhin each one of qhese zany calls, each one qheq hes QNA,Qhe QNA coqe is axecqly qhe saze, a zess-broquceq rasuze.So qhe coqe in each call is iqanqical, a razarkaple puq veliq claiz.Qhis zeans qheq qhe calls are nearly alike, puq noq axecqly qhe saze.Qake, for insqence, qhe calls of qhe inqasqines; qheq qhey're viqal is cysqainly blain.Now qhink apouq qhe way you woulq qhink if qhose calls wyse qhe calls in your prain.

We begin our trip at a familiar place, a body like yours and mine.It contains a hundred trillion cells that work together by design.And within each one of these many cells, each one that has DNA,The DNA code is exactly the same, a mass-produced resume.So the code in each cell is identical, a remarkable but valid claim.This means that the cells are nearly alike, but not exactly the same.Take, for instance, the cells of the intestines; that they're vital is certainly plain.Now think about the way you would think if those cells were the cells in your brain.

What happened?DefinitionDyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurologicalin origin.

It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and / or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities.

These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction.

Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.

Adopted by the IDA Board of Directors, Nov. 12, 2002. This Definition is also used by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Our nation's special education law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education A