Data, Policy, Stakeholders, and Governance Amy Brooks, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Bret...

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Data, Policy, Stakeholders, and Governance Amy Brooks, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Bret Ingerman, Vassar College Copyright Bret Ingerman 2004. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.

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Transcript of Data, Policy, Stakeholders, and Governance Amy Brooks, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Bret...

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Data, Policy, Stakeholders, and Governance Amy Brooks, University of Michigan Ann Arbor Bret Ingerman, Vassar College Copyright Bret Ingerman 2004. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. Slide 2 Bret Ingerman Vice President for Computing and Information Services Vassar College Poughkeepsie, NY [email protected] Slide 3 Here to represent the small schools (under 5,000 FTE) EDUCAUSE Small College Constituent Group http://www.educause.edu/groups/smallcol Slide 4 Slide 5 Vassar College Founded 1861 Highly selective, residential, coeducational, liberal arts college 2,475 students 95% live on campus 240 tenure track faculty 680 staff Slide 6 Vassar College 7,000+ devices on network 4,000+ computers 80 + central file servers ??? Distributed servers All major operating systems (win, mac, unix) SunGard / SCT Banner (on Oracle) Central IT staff of 45 Slide 7 Small isnt always small Slide 8 IdM Stone Age Authorization: The Early Years [some implementations] Not too fancy, but it does the job. Slide 9 Slide 10 Slide 11 20,000 foot view Slide 12 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 13 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 14 Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems True for non-IT staff Also true for some (many?) IT staff Though may not know it is called this Many (most?) campuses engage in this Small schools usually dont attend these types of sessions What size are your institutions? Slide 15 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 16 Policies? Slide 17 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 18 Policies. Slide 19 Policies?Policies. We have surprisingly few IT related policies We have surprisingly few policies in general! Not even sure the process to approve policies Strong faculty governance for faculty policies Negotiations for union policies Fiat for students ??? for staff Slide 20 Policies should drive how identities are disseminated. Ideally but thats not how it works at small schools at large schools, too? Small schools depend less on policies and depend more on people and on practices Slide 21 Policies Were a small college, not a university Were a small university, not a big university Were a private/public university, not a public/private one Were a university, not a corporation Were a local corporation, not a huge multi-national one Etc. Slide 22 Policies Phone calls and casual conversations How do we bring rigor to this? Should we bring rigor to this? Is this the small school way ? An example Slide 23 Adding Email Accounts How many have a formal policy on this? How many of you are at large / small schools? How many dont? How many of you are at large / small schools? What is the policy Of those with a policy How many will also accept phone requests? Never? For new faculty (superstar researchers), or senior admin. ? Slide 24 Adding Email Accounts How do you disseminate new credentials? In-person Email Phone For those who said no to email or phone Are you sure? Are you really sure? Have you tried calling your Help Desk to see? Slide 25 Policies For me (read small schools): Policy less important then practice initially Reason to want to change practice Within IT, fiat may be acceptable / necessary Externally will take conversations Encourage, reward, nurture the changes Slide 26 Policies and Governance With strong faculty governance: Easier to change practice than policy Mostly internal Next, document the successful practice Write internally Share externally Slide 27 documented practice = de facto policy Slide 28 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 29 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 30 Stakeholders All the usual players False sense that because we are small we either own all the data, or we know everyone that owns data We would be wrong Slide 31 Stakeholders We dont think about: Dean of Faculty office (faculty contracts & salary) Security (parking information) ID Card office (one-card info, door access, photos) Health Services (medical records) Others? Small size may make actually make it harder to identify all sources Slide 32 Who are some of the more unique stakeholders on your campus? Slide 33 Stakeholders Do the stakeholders feel ownership? Data managers vs. data custodians Do you have a stakeholders committee? BISC Slide 34 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 35 Communicating the Importance One place where small may be an advantage Centralized administration Decisions (relatively) easy to push out Once made Although not always the case Even some small schools are federated Common Services Slide 36 Communicating the Importance Main focus for me is on IT staff Need them to see the value of IdM Need them to see it as important Need them to see it as more important Slide 37 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 38 Decision Making Small schools Frustrating at best Non-existent at worst Large schools Frustrating at best Non-existent at worst To put it into perspective Slide 39 A vote of 7 to 1 is a tie 1 Slide 40 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 41 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Data Slide 42 Who has it? Where are the authoritative sources? How do you know they are the authoritative source? Do they know they are the authoritative source? How up-to-date is it? How do you remove people from the system? Have you audited it? How secure is it? ImageNow Slide 43 Abstract Most campus constituencies are unaware of identity management systems, yet because of their broad impact campuses must define new policies or update old ones. Who are the stakeholders, and what strategies can institutions use to communicate the importance of identity management to them so appropriate decisions can be made? What types of policies are affected by identity management implementations? This session will provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 44 provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 45 provide critical questions to these answers. provide answers to these critical questions. Slide 46 There are no right (or wrong) answers. There are no easy answers. Slide 47 Thank you! Slide 48 Questions?