Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

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$ 1 10 INCLUDES G.S.T. TUESDAY JULY 22, 2014 TownsmanBulletin Like Us @crantownsman Follow Us < The best of JulyFest Photos from Kimberley’s annual festival | Page 2 Homegrown victory > Cranbrook team wins JulyFest tournament | Page 7 Vol. 63, Issue 139 Proudly serving Cranbrook and area since 1951 www.dailytownsman.com STORIES OR IDEAS TO SHARE? Drop us an email, a Tweet, a Facebook message, or give us a call if you have any story ideas you would like to share. www.dailytownsman.com JulyFest keeps police busy CAROLYN GRANT Daily Bulletin JulyFest in Kimberley has come and gone, and while the events were filled to capacity, co- ordinator Dave Clarke reports well-behaved crowds. Kimberley RCMP NCO Cpl. Chris Newel concurs with the well-behaved crowds at events, but says police did have to re- spond to over 40 calls for service. “Although bocce players and attendees were relatively well be- haved and likely enjoyed the weekend, police dealt with sever- al incidents outside of the festivi- ties,” Newel said. The most serious were two as- saults, which occurred early Sun- day morning. Two persons were taken to hospital with injuries described as “not serious” when an incident at a Chapman Street house party spilled outside. One male from Cranbrook was arrested and will be facing assault charges, Newel said. SALLY MACDONALD Townsman Staff Cranbrook is wear- ing its generous heart on its sleeve once more, having just been named the biggest givers in Home Depot’s fundrais- er for Street Angel this spring. Between May 29 and July 2, customers at the Home Depot store in Cranbrook were asked if Cranbrook shows its generous spirit SALLY MACDONALD PHOTO Home Depot staff presented a cheque for more than $15,000 to Street Angel on Friday, July 18, raised through the store’s Orange Door Project this spring. Pictured, left to right: Sheri Miles, Lori Johnson, Diane Whitehead-Bissett, Shannon Girling-Hebert, Anita Fleet, Erica Buchignani, and Barry Mechalchuk. Local Home Depot customers top in Canada during June fundraising drive for Street Angel they would like to do- nate to Street Angel through the chain’s Or- ange Door Project. Those donations added up to $7,724. When Home Depot cal- culated the amount do- nated by customers as a percentage compared to the total sales at the store during that time, Cranbrook came out first in Canada. Home Depot matched the customers’ donations dollar for dol- lar, meaning that on Fri- day, July 18, the store presented a cheque for $15,448 to Street Angel representatives. Home Depot’s Barry Mechalchuk said Cran- brook customers really got behind the fundrais- er because 100 per cent of the donations went to the local charity, which provides drop-in ser- vices for the city’s home- less and at-risk popula- tion. “The community support was fantastic,” said Mechalchuk. “The biggest thing was the money stays in Cran- brook and 100 per cent of what was raised goes to the charity.” During the fundrais- er, a giant pair of wings was hung inside the store, alongside a pair of orange doors explaining the project. The fundraising peri- od wrapped up with a barbecue outside the store on July 2. Street Angel’s Shan- non Girling-Hebert said the donation will help the charity as it prepares to relocate from its 14th Avenue location to the former Cranbrook Con- nections building in Balment Park, beside the skate park. The move is planned for September, and will provide more space for the drop-in centre and the burgeoning nurse practitioner’s clinic, as well as saving money on rent. RCMP report relatively well-behaved crowds at events, but several incidents outside of official events ARNE PETRYSHEN Townsman Staff Back in late April, council decid- ed to put its support behind a move to prevent invasive mussels from entering B.C.’s lakes and streams. Council directed staff to send a letter to the federal government, reaffirming its support for a 2013 Union of B.C. Municipalities reso- lution on invasive mussels after receiving correspondence from the Okanagan Basin Water Board. At the July 14 meeting, council received positive replies from the federal and provincial government. “It basically says they are taking the problem very seriously,” Mayor Wayne Stetski said. “The federal government is developing a regula- tory proposal to manage the threat.” Province, feds working to hold back mussel invasion See U.S. BOATS, Page 3 See POLICE, Page 3

description

July 22, 2014 edition of the Cranbrook Daily Townsman

Transcript of Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

Page 1: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

$110inCLUDES

G.S.T.

TUESDayJULy 22, 2014

TownsmanBulletin

Like Us

@crantownsman

Follow Us

< The best of JulyFestPhotos from Kimberley’s annual festival | Page 2

Homegrown victory >Cranbrook team wins JulyFest tournament | Page 7

Vol. 63, Issue 139 Proudly serving Cranbrook and area since 1951 www.dailytownsman.com

STORIES OR IDEAS TO SHARE?

Drop us an email, a Tweet, a Facebook message, or give us a call if you have

any story ideas you would like to share.

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JulyFest keeps police busyC AROLYN GR ANT

Daily Bulletin

JulyFest in Kimberley has come and gone, and while the events were filled to capacity, co-ordinator Dave Clarke reports well-behaved crowds.

Kimberley RCMP NCO Cpl. Chris Newel concurs with the well-behaved crowds at events,

but says police did have to re-spond to over 40 calls for service.

“Although bocce players and attendees were relatively well be-haved and likely enjoyed the weekend, police dealt with sever-al incidents outside of the festivi-ties,” Newel said.

The most serious were two as-saults, which occurred early Sun-

day morning.Two persons were taken to

hospital with injuries described as “not serious” when an incident at a Chapman Street house party spilled outside.

One male from Cranbrook was arrested and will be facing assault charges, Newel said.

SALLY MACDONALDTownsman Staff

Cranbrook is wear-ing its generous heart on its sleeve once more, having just been named the biggest givers in Home Depot’s fundrais-er for Street Angel this spring.

Between May 29 and July 2, customers at the Home Depot store in Cranbrook were asked if

Cranbrook shows its generous spirit

Sally MacDonalD photo

Home Depot staff presented a cheque for more than $15,000 to Street Angel on Friday, July 18, raised through the store’s Orange Door Project this spring. Pictured, left to right: Sheri Miles, Lori Johnson, Diane Whitehead-Bissett, Shannon Girling-Hebert, Anita Fleet, Erica Buchignani, and Barry Mechalchuk.

Local Home Depot customers top in Canada during June fundraising drive for Street Angel

they would like to do-nate to Street Angel through the chain’s Or-ange Door Project.

Those donations added up to $7,724. When Home Depot cal-culated the amount do-nated by customers as a percentage compared to the total sales at the

store during that time, Cranbrook came out first in Canada.

Home Depot matched the customers’ donations dollar for dol-lar, meaning that on Fri-day, July 18, the store presented a cheque for $15,448 to Street Angel representatives.

Home Depot’s Barry Mechalchuk said Cran-brook customers really got behind the fundrais-er because 100 per cent of the donations went to the local charity, which provides drop-in ser-vices for the city’s home-less and at-risk popula-tion.

“The community support was fantastic,” said Mechalchuk. “The biggest thing was the money stays in Cran-brook and 100 per cent of what was raised goes to the charity.”

During the fundrais-er, a giant pair of wings was hung inside the

store, alongside a pair of orange doors explaining the project.

The fundraising peri-od wrapped up with a barbecue outside the store on July 2.

Street Angel’s Shan-non Girling-Hebert said the donation will help the charity as it prepares

to relocate from its 14th Avenue location to the former Cranbrook Con-nections building in Balment Park, beside the skate park.

The move is planned for September, and will provide more space for the drop-in centre and the burgeoning nurse practitioner’s clinic, as well as saving money on rent.

RCMP report relatively well-behaved crowds at events, but several incidents outside of official events ARNe PeTRYSheN

Townsman Staff

Back in late April, council decid-ed to put its support behind a move to prevent invasive mussels from entering B.C.’s lakes and streams.

Council directed staff to send a letter to the federal government, reaffirming its support for a 2013 Union of B.C. Municipalities reso-lution on invasive mussels after receiving correspondence from the

Okanagan Basin Water Board. At the July 14 meeting, council

received positive replies from the federal and provincial government.

“It basically says they are taking the problem very seriously,” Mayor Wayne Stetski said. “The federal government is developing a regula-tory proposal to manage the threat.”

Province, feds working to hold back mussel invasion

See U.S. BOATS, Page 3See POLICE, Page 3

Page 2: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

Page 2 Tuesday, JuLy 22, 2014

communitysnapshotdaily townsman / daily bulletin

JulyFest 2014

Karen Soldan photoKaren Soldan photo

Karen Soldan photo

Karen Soldan photo

Carolyn Grant photo

Carolyn Grant photo

Carolyn Grant photo

Carolyn Grant photo

Carolyn Grant photo

Page 3: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

Tuesday, JuLy 22, 2014 Page 3

LocaL NEWSdaily townsman

POLLWEEKLog on to www.dailytownsman.com to make your vote count.

of the

This web poll is informal. It reflects opinions of site visitors who voluntarily participate. Results may not represent the opinions of the public as a whole. Black Press is not responsible for the statistical accuracy of opinions expressed here.

“It’s time for JulyFest. Will you be participating in at least some of the

festivities this weekend?”

This week’s poll: “Do you believe the teachers labour dispute will be settled by the time the new

school year starts?”

YES: 37% NO: 63%

Police kept busy for JulyFest weekend

Ste ve HubrecHtColumbia Valley Pioneer

During its most recent council meeting, Jumbo Glacier Mountain Resort Municipality council gave first and second readings to a zon-ing bylaw allowing for the construction of ski lifts and lodges.

The bylaw received the initial readings at the Tuesday, July 15 council meeting and applies to the controlled recreation area in the higher al-pine areas of the municipality, with the excep-tion of the Farnham Glacier.

It allows for the land to be developed as a ski area, including the construction of ski lifts and other typical ski resort infrastructure, such as hotels, day lodges, restaurants, retail offices, staff and employee accommodation, ski schools, ski patrol buildings, service and maintenance build-ings, and the associated water, sewer, power, communication and transportation systems.

“This is for the land that will stay with the pro-vincial government and be leased by the ski hill operator, not any land that will be used for com-mercial purposes in the base area,” said Jumbo mayor Greg Deck.

The Farnham Glacier area of the municipality is covered under a somewhat similar bylaw passed by council in May 2013, although the scope of infrastructure envisioned under the Farnham area bylaw is considerably smaller.

The municipality will hold a public hearing on the bylaw on Wednesday, August 6 at 9:30 a.m. at the Prestige Inn in Radium Hot Springs.

Public given chance to speak

at Jumbo hearing

In addition, police have re-ceived a report of a second as-sault and are investigating that.

There also the usual assort-ment of impaired drivers, drug seizures and public intoxica-tion.

“Several impaired drivers were taken off the road; two were 90-day driving prohibi-tions and the remaining ones three-day,” Newel said. “There

were two drug seizures. Several persons were arrested for being drunk in public. In the majority of cases, police were able to turn them over to sober per-sons but six were held in custo-dy until sober. A City of Kim-berley garbage truck sustained minor damage by an upset pa-tron who was ejected by securi-ty for causing a problem.

“Police dealt with a number of minor complaints involving noise. On Sunday morning po-

lice received several minor theft complaints. A possible suspect was identified but po-lice are still in the midst of de-termining if there is enough evidence to pursue a charge.

“A number of violation tick-ets were issued over the week-end, including consuming al-cohol in public which carries a $230 fine.”

Overall, police were pleased with the behaviour of JulyFest crowds, especially considering

the number of events at maxi-mum capacity.

As always, the police pres-ence was very visible, which often helps deter bad be-haviour.

“A few individuals expressed their displeasure in having to obey the law, but Julyfest does not mean police turn a blind eye,” Newel said. “Overall po-lice were pleased with the atti-tude and behaviour of the ma-jority of people.”

Under the proposal, Canada Border Service Agencies will have the ability to enforce prohi-bitions at the Canadian border, which means turning back boats that have the invasive quag-ga or zebra mussels on them.

The increased en-forcement ability comes as a result of recent changes to the Fisheries Act which solidifies and makes explicit the au-thority to address the aquatic invasive species (AIS).

“In recognition of the serious threats posed by AIS to Canadi-an freshwater ecosys-tems, (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)’s AIS program focuses on ac-tivities at the national and regional levels,” Gail Shea, minister of Fisheries and Oceans,

wrote to council. “These activities in-clude scientific re-search, risk assessment and monitoring, so-cio-economic analysis, outreach and regulato-ry development.”

Minister Shea refer-enced the role that the province plays.

In the letter from the province, Minister of Environment Mary Polak noted how serious a problem the mussels could be.

“A B.C. specific eco-nomic impact assess-ment of zebra and quag-ga mussel invasion de-termined these species would cost B.C. $28 mil-lion per annum as a conservative estimate,” Polak wrote. “Further, the establishment of these invasive mussels would also adversely impact the viability of

important commercial, recreational and Ab-original fisheries within the province.”

Polak said the pro-vincial zebra and quag-ga mussel Early Detec-tion and Rapid Re-sponse Plan is currently in the draft stage and

will be completed over the next several weeks. In the meantime, an in-terim prevention plan has been in place and implemented since the summer of 2013.

“While we have made significant ac-complishments in put-

U.S. boats may be turned back at border to protect against invasive mussels

Proposed bylaw would pave the way for construction of ski lifts

and lodges in resort municipality

Cost of PROMOTING a little more than you planned for?

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Need help? Call and speak to one of our ad representatives...✓ Cranbrook Daily Townsman (250) 426-5201✓ Kimberley Daily Bulletin (250) 427-5333

ting policies, procedures and programs in place to protect B.C.’s waters from invasive mussels, there is still much work to be done,” Polak said. “The province will con-tinue to work with fed-eral, provincial and local partners to build support and collabora-tive approaches to en-sure the threat of inva-sive mussels is ad-dressed.”

continued from page 1

For the townsman

Invasive quagga mussels cover a boat motor in this file photo.

continued from page 1

Arne PetrySHen Townsman Staff

City council has paved the way for a proposal to have a go-kart track in the city.

On July 14, council ap-proved the application for a Steep Slope Development Per-mit which will enable develop-ment of a paved go-kart track.

“There’s still a few steps to go, but I think we’re all really excited about hopefully seeing this on the ground and operat-ing one day,” said Mayor Wayne Stetski.

At the June 24, 2013 meet-ing, council approved a zoning amendment which added amusement park including go-

kart track to the permitted uses of the M-2 Zone specific to the property located at 1000 Indus-trial Road 2.

Because the property was designated a Steep Slope De-velopment Permit area, an as-sessment was completed by McElhanney Consulting Ser-vices as part of the develop-ment permit approval process.

The city received an appli-cation for the permit from Chris Hirn to enable develop-ment of a property.

The go-kart track will con-sist of a paved track, approxi-mately 365 metres long and six metres wide with a portable trailer on site.

The applicant met with En-gineering, Planning and Eco-nomic Development staff and was provided the following re-quirements:

• Meet erosion and sedi-ment control requirements.

• Provide water/sewer ser-vices to the site, or enter into a development agreement with engineering including provi-sion of security to provide ser-vices within one year, or alter-natively, seek a Development Variance Permit, exempting the site from site servicing re-quirements for the go-kart use.

• Obtain a business license. Coun. Sharon Cross won-

dered if the process was taking

too long.“This is kind of a seasonal

activity and so I’m wondering if the window is slowly closing on his opportunity and I hope that doesn’t impact him too much,” Cross said.

“I think, originally when we looked at this over a year ago, it was a three to four month oper-ation.”

CAO Wayne Staudt noted that there’s still some ways to go.

“As you pointed out, he does have a few more things he has to get done,” Staudt said. “I know he’s been working on the site.”

Staudt said Hirn has done quite a bit of work on his own.

Council paves way for go-kart track

Page 4: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

Page 4 Tuesday, JuLy 22, 2014 daily townsman

features

By Blair Qualey

It’s that time of year when more British Columbians dust off their bicycles and hit the road. Whether it’s to commute to work or enjoy the scenery, the number of cyclists on the roads increases from May to October, peaking in the summer months.

Unfortunately, it’s also the time of year when we see more accidents between cars and bicycles. According to ICBC, on average, 160 cyclists are injured every month from May to October, and the problem isn’t isolated to any one region. In the Lower Mainland, ICBC says 630 cyclists are injured and four killed from May to October every year, based on crash data from 2009 and 2013 and fatality data from 2008 to

2012. That means an average of 100 cyclists are injured every month from May to October in the region. Regardless of who is to blame for these accidents, both drivers and cyclists (many of whom participate in both activities) are responsible for helping to keep our roadssafe. The BC government, police and ICBC recently launched a campaign to remind drivers on both two and four wheels about the rules of the road. They also offered some tips that I thought were worth sharing: Tips for cyclists:- Get a tune up: Regular bike maintenance will prevent breakdowns on the roads that can lead to accidents.- Plan ahead: Know what route you’re taking and choose designated bike lanes and paths

where possible. Also plan for the weather and potential delays such as traffic jams or construction activity.- Get off the sidewalk: It’s illegal to cycle on most sidewalks, not to mention it puts pedestrians in potential danger.- Be alert: Watch for potholes, gravel, and opening car doors ahead that are potential hazards.- Wear a helmet: It’s the law in BC, after all. It also keeps you safe. Tips for drivers:- Be alert: Lookout for cyclists and make eye contact when possible to let them know you see them.- Shoulder check: You do this when you’re changing lanes to watch for other cars, but you also need to do it when you’re crossing a bike lane or pulling off to the side of the road.

- Mind the doors: Before you or a passenger open the door to get out of the vehicle, look to see if there’s a cyclist approaching behind you.- Leave room: Cyclists may need to react quickly to potential hazards. Experts recommend leaving at least three seconds of following distance.- Don’t honk unless you have to: That might get the attention of the driver ahead of you, but for a cyclist it could be startling and actually cause an accident. Only lay on the horn if you need to give a cyclist a warning. Happy cycling, and driving. Be safe. Blair Qualey is President and CEO of the New Car Dealers Association of BC. Email him at [email protected].

On the road ... 2 Wheel Safety Special Information Supplement

New Car Dealers Association of BCProud to celebrate a 30 year relationship with Special Olympics BC

Anyone familiar with theNew Car Dealers Associationof BC knows our affinity forand connection to the SpecialOlympics BC (SOBC).

Our members are among thelongest-standing supportersof the SOBC, raising funds

through our charitable arm, the New CarDealers Foundation of B.C.

This year we are proud to celebrate the 30-year relationship between the SOBCmovementand the New Car Dealers of B.C., a partnershipthat has played a critical part in the growthof the volunteer non-profit organization. TheSOBC is dedicated to providing opportunitiesfor individuals with intellectual disabilities

and their pursuit with sports training andcompetition.

Since 1984, the Foundation has raised morethan $3.6 million for the SOBC. One of themany ways New Car Dealers support SOBCathletes and programs is during the annualVancouver International Auto Show. Eachyear, partial proceeds of the Preview Galadinner and awards ceremony go towardsthe Foundation. This year’s gala will includeawards presentation for the 2013 Salespeopleof the Year and the first-annual CommunityDriver Awards.

The 94th annual Vancouver InternationalAuto Show, which runs from March 25 to 30 atthe Vancouver Convention Centre, is also a greatfamily-friendly opportunity to check out coolnewmodels and concepts for the year ahead.

It’s the third-largest Auto Show in Canadaand B.C.’s new model showcase for theCanadian automotive industry. Leading globalmanufacturers will be onsite showcasing thehottest new models and trends, with the latestdesigns and technologies. It’s also a chance forauto enthusiasts to gain hands-on experiencewith some of the world’s most popular brands.

Visitors at this year’s show will also getto experience a bit of automotive historyat Hagerty Classic Alley. On display will bebeautiful cars from the 1950s and 1960s,including a special salute to the Ford Mustangand its 50th anniversary celebration.

Two classic cars will also be auctioned off,with 100 per cent of the proceeds going towardstwo very deserving causes. The first is a 1966

Plymouth Satellite, funds from which will gotowards the MS Society of Canada. The secondis a 1966 Ford Mustang Coupe, profits fromwhich will be donated to the New Car DealersFoundation for causes like the SOBC.

If you or someone you know is looking forvaluable career information, we also haveeverything you need to know about youroptions in our industry. And believe me,today, the options are endless, with positionsthat include everything from salespeople tomechanics, eCommerce Managers and DigitalMarketing specialists.

Formore information on the showplease visit:http://vancouverinternationalautoshow.comBlair Qualey is President and CEO of the

New Car Dealers Association of BC.Email him at [email protected]..

By Blair Qualey

Regardless of who is to blame for these accidents, both drivers and cyclists (many of whom participate in both activities) are responsible for helping to keep our roads safe.

INVITATION TO TENDERGrader

The City of Cranbrook is inviting Tenders for the supply of one Grader.

Tender Documents will be available from City Hall at 40 – 10th Avenue South Cranbrook BC. The documents are also available on BCBid and on the City’s web site under “Business – Tenders”.

Sealed Tenders, labeled with Tenderer’s name, project name and Owner’s name must be submitted by 2:30:00 pm, local time, Friday, August 1, 2014 to:

Attention: Melissa Smith, Financial Services ManagerCity of Cranbrook40 10th Avenue SouthCranbrook, BCV1C 2M8

Late submissions will be rejected.

The City reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders submitted.

Kimberley and CranbrookWeekly Curbside Recycling Pickup

CALL 250-489-8448 or 250-421-3739EMAIL: [email protected]

ONLY$16/mo NO

SORTINGREQUIRED!

Sally MacDonalDTownsman Staff

Bugs have a vital role in helping Cranbrook get rid of the roughly 2 million gallons of waste-water that we produce

every day.We are learning how

microorganisms do away with our feces in the most unappetizing way at the city’s waste-water lagoons.

On a tour of the site with Director of Public Works Joe McGowan, we’ve learnt how the city filters out “floaties” and foreign materials from the wastewater, before billions of micro-organisms go to work breaking down the or-ganic material like they’re Lance Arm-strong in the Tour de France.

There are three la-goons at the wastewater site. Each lagoon is slightly lower than the last, and the wastewater flows from the first pond into the second and then the third.

Each lagoon has a different colony of mi-croorganisms. The first pond receives more ox-

ygen, so it has bugs that do much of the hard work breaking down or-ganic materials.

McGowan describes the bugs in the first la-goon as grizzly bears.

“It’s like a bunch of people standing around a Las Vegas buffet. They don’t care what they are presented with, they are going to eat it in huge quantities.”

In the second pond, the bugs get what’s left over – they are lean run-ners with a narrower diet.

And the third la-goon’s bugs are essen-tially vultures – they will eat anything.

What’s more, the temperature in the la-goons gets cooler the

further from the source. The first pond is on av-erage seven or eight de-grees warmer than the third. There’s two rea-sons for that: first, wastewater is warm when it leaves your home, because the water picks up the heat in your home as it pass-es through. Second, the microorganisms gener-ate heat as they are feed-ing on the organic mate-rial.

Once the wastewater has flown through the lagoons, it’s now con-sidered “effluent” - treated sewage. When it leaves the third lagoon, it goes through another screener – that conveyer belt that it first met at the head of the lagoons – which picks up any-thing that has fallen into the lagoons along the way, such as bulrushes.

It then flows into a large underground chamber. From there, pumps pick up the efflu-ent and force it up the hill into a trunk main that carries the waste-water to Cranbrook’s spray irrigation fields in Mayook.

Here, the wastewater sits in two ponds, which add more oxygen to the water so that bugs can continue to work on the little organic material that’s left. Then the ef-fluent – now containing little more than water – goes through an ultravi-olet facility the city built in 2012.

Here, the water is sent through pipes that contain dozens of fluo-

rescent lights, which kick off pathogens in the water. The ultraviolet light doesn’t kill the bugs, but it renders them infertile.

If you turn on the tap inside the ultraviolet fa-cility, water gushes out – water that bares little resemblance to sewage because the bugs have done such a thorough job of cleaning it.

The water is then piped all over the spray fields – 900 hectares of pastures where cattle graze and hay crops grow.

Only about 10 per cent of Cranbrook’s wastewater is not used on the spray fields. That 10 per cent is piped to the opposite end of the spray fields to a third la-goon, built in 2011.

Before it goes into that lagoon, the water is treated again – at a building that’s the only place a chemical is added to the wastewater.

Here, alum is added

to the water, a chemical that settles out the phos-phorous. There’s about a thimble full of alum added to each cubic metre of water.

From the third la-goon, the water is treat-ed for a final time at a second ultraviolet facili-ty. That is essentially the end for Cranbrook’s hardest working bugs. Their job complete, they are put to rest as the lit-tle leftover wastewater is sent into the Kootenay River.

Each fall, for two or three weeks, the city empties what is left of the irrigation water it no longer needs into the river, ready to start col-lecting wastewater over the winter for the com-ing farming season.

McGowan explains that, thanks to those dedicated, hungry bugs, the water the city sends into the Kootenay River is better quality than the spring melt that is al-ready in the river.

A Bug’s Life

The end of the line for the little bugs that couldIn the conclusion of a three-part series on how Cranbrook turns sewage into water, we learn how the bugs in our wastewater change as the effluent moves through the wastewater system

Sally MacDonalD photo

The water from these taps was once our waste and is now ready to be used for irrigation.

WeatherOutlook

TonighT

friDay

ToMorrow

highnormal

Sunrise

27 0

6:00 am

Aug. 3 Aug. 10 Aug. 17 July 26

9 0record

Sunset

36.6 0 1985

21:39 pm

7.2 0 1968

0.0 mm

Sunday

Precipitation yesterday

26.6 0 14 0

SaTurDay

ThurSDay

low

SunDay

11

26

27

13

10

POP 40%

POP 0%

POP 30%

16

30

12

12

POP 20%

POP 0%

24

9POP 0%

Temperatures/almanac

waning Quarter

waxing Quarter

new Moon

full Moon

Page 5: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

Tuesday, JuLy 22, 2014 Page 5daily townsman / daily bulletin

business/features

Sally MacDonalDTownsman Staff

There’s a trendy new boutique shop-ping experience in Cranbrook.

On July 3, Freyja Lifestyle Fashion opened its second location in Cranbrook, in a space shared by Muriel and Jane’s General Store, which recently moved from its 10th Avenue spot to a new home on 9th Avenue.

Laurie Goodlad, owner of Muriel and Jane’s, which opened in 2011, said the new location has more character and was a great opportunity to share a front door with the expansion of the popular Fernie store Freyja.

“The two stores complement each other, though they are not combined,” said Freyja owner Chantel Souliere, who grew up in Cranbrook before relocating to Fern-ie and opening her original store in 2006.

Freyja and Muriel and Jane’s are located at 16 – 9th Avenue, in the space previously occupied by the Vanity Room.

Muriel and Jane’s takes up the front space, as well as several smaller rooms set up as living space to display homewares.

Freyja is located in the space that used to be home to a hair salon.

The two business owners met several years ago through Chantel’s mother, a fre-quent Muriel and Jane’s customer.

Chantel first ran several pop-up shops in Muriel and Jane’s in the lead-up to Christmas: a one-evening-only shopping experience where Cranbrook customers could purchase Freyja fashion. These eve-nings were popular, and Chantel said she had several Cranbrook residents who made the trip to Fernie to visit Freyja, so she knew a second store here was a good

Funky and fresh at twin boutiquesKIMBERLEY AND CRANBROOK COMMUNITY CALENDARKIMBERLEY AND CRANBROOK What’s Up?

Place your notice in your “What’s Up?” Community Calendar FREE of charge. This column is intended for the use of clubs and

non-pro� t organizations to publicize their coming events — provided the following requirements are met:

• Notices will be accepted two weeks prior to the event.• All notices must be emailed, faxed or dropped off in person.

No telephone calls please.• NOTICES SHOULD NOT EXCEED 30 WORDS.

• Only one notice per week from any one club or organization.• All notices must be received by the Thursday prior to publication• There is no guarantee of publication. Notices will run subject to

space limitations.

CRANBROOK TOWNSMAN & KIMBERLEY BULLETIN COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Drop off : 822 Cranbrook St. N. • Drop off : 335 Spokane StreetE-mail: [email protected] • Fax: 250-426-5003

ONGOING Kimberley Farmers’ Market: Thursdays, 5 - 7:30pm – July 3rd to Sept 11. Howard St above the Platzl in KimberleyCranbrook Phoenix Toastmasters meet every Thursday, noon -1:00 Heritage Inn. Toastmasters teaches communication & leadership skills. Roberta 250-489-0174. 1911.toastmastersclubs.org.The Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation invites anyone expecting bone and joint surgery to make contact with local volunteers for peer support. The free Ortho Connect program helps to ease the fear, stress and anxiety that go along with surgery and help patients prepare. 1-800-461-3639 ext 4, and ask for Lauralee.TOPS (Take O� Pounds Sensibly) non pro� t weight loss support group meets EVERY Thursday at 5:00 pm at the Sr Citizen’s Centre, (downstairs) 125 17th Ave S, Cranbrook. Drop in, have fun while losing weight gradually. This Chapter has won an annual B.C. Provincial Award for “BEST AVG WEIGHT LOSS PER MEMBER”. Info: Marie 250 417 2642 Help Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cranbrook: One way you can help is by donating to our “Blue Bin” located outside to the left of Wal- Mart. This bin is there for any clothing items or soft items. (250)489-3111 or email us at @bigbrothersbigsisters.caDance/Practice: every Saturday. Practice from 7 to 8 PM, dancing until 11 PM. Dance With Me Cranbrook Studio, 206-14 A 13th Street, South, behind Safeway.Volunteers are needed to assist sta� with childminding while parents attend programs at the Kimberley Early Learning Center. Come play!! Weekly or monthly for 2 hours. Diana 250427-0716 CRANBROOK QUILTERS’ GUILD hold their meetings every 2nd & 4th Tuesday of each month at 7:15pm upstairs in the Seniors’ Hall, 125-17th Ave. S. Everyone welcome. Info: Donna at 250-426-7136.Cranbrook Writer’s Group meet on the 4th Monday of the month at the Arts Council. Engage in writing exercises, constructive critiques & share in information on upcoming literary events & contests. Cbk and District Arts Council, 104, 135-10th Ave S, CBK. info: 250-426-4223 www.cranbrookanddistrictartscouncil.comICBL-Duplicate Bridge–Senior Center in Cranbrook. Mon & Wed 7pm, Thurs & Fri 1pm at Scout Hall, Marysville. Info: Maggie 250-417-2868.Bibles For Missions Thrift Store, 824 Kootenay St. N., Cranbrook - serving our community to bene� t others - at home and abroad. We turn your donations into helping dollars! Open Tues-Sat 10am-5pm. Phone 778-520-1981.East Kootenay Women Executives & Entrepreneurs (EKWEE) meet the � rst Monday of every month at the Heritage Inn, Dining Room Annex, 7:00PM. Join us for of the menu dinner 5:30-7:00. Pay your own tab. Networking, share accomplishments, education. Bev Campbell 778-481-4883Moyie Museum OPEN Sundays 1-3pm, July & August. Opposite Moyie Church - come and see Moyie’s history!Cranbrook and District Arts Council bears for the summer long business ‘Teddy Bear Hide and Seek’ and the August 23rd Teddy Bear Picnic, available at the Gallery, 135-10th Ave. S., Cranbrook. Proceeds to Arts Council projects. Sponsored by Spring Honda.Mark Creek Lions meet 1st and 3rd Wednesdays at the Kimbrook. Meet & Greet from 6:00-6:30pm, supper 6:30-7:00, meeting 7:00-8:00pm. Contact 250-427-5612 or 250-427-7496. New members welcome – men and ladies! Royal Canadian Legion Branch 24; Friday Meat Draw: 4:30- 6:30, Saturday Meat Draw: 3:30-5:30. Seniors Autobiographical Writing for those aged 60 or wiser at the Kimberley Library. No writing experience necessary. It’s free. Tuesdays 10:00 - Noon. Register: Kim Roberts CBAL Coordinator 250-427-4468 or [email protected] Cellar Thrift Store Open Mon. to Sat., noon to 4:30 p.m. Our revenues support local programs and outreach programs of Cranbrook United Church. Baker Lane Entry at 2 – 12th Ave. S. Cranbrook, B. C. Donations of new or gently used items welcome.Visit the Kootenay Trout Hatchery this summer! Daily activities include � shing our stocked pond, participate in our learn to � sh program, an educational tour, and more. Contact us visit.kootenay@go� shbc.com 250-429-3214.Canadian Cancer Society- if you have spare time and would like to volunteer, interested applicants can call 250-426-8916, drop by our o� ce at #19-9th Avenue S, Cranbrook or go to www.� ghtwithus.ca and register as a volunteer.Do you have the desire to stop eating compulsively? Overeaters Anonymous (a 12-Step Program) meets Wednesdays from 7-8pm at Cranbrook United Church, 2-12th St. S., downstairs. Contact: [email protected]

UPCOMING2014 FREE PUBLIC SWIM Wednesday, August 6th, 5:00-6:00pm is sponsored by Creekside Physiotherapy Clinic.2014 FREE FAMILY SWIM Wednesday, August 20th, 6:00-7:00pm is sponsored by Kootenay Monument Installations. Persons 18 years & younger must be accompanied by an adult.Cranbrook & District Arts Council Teddy Bears available for you to creatively dress for the Aug 23 Teddy Bear Picnic. Under 14 yrs, over 14 yrs, and Business categories. Cash prizes. 135 - 10 Ave. S., Tues-Fri 11-5, Sat 10-2. 250-426-4223

Popular Fernie fashion store Freyja has opened in Cranbrook, sharing a space with the newly relocated Muriel and Jane’s General Store

Sally MacDonalD photo

Chantel Souliere, owner of Freyja Lifestyle Fashion, and Laurie Goodlad (right), owner of Muriel and Jane’s, welcome customers to their twin boutiques in Cranbrook.

idea.“I knew deep down that it was going to

work,” Chantal said. “I just needed the op-portunity and Laurie provided that.”

Laurie said that, after three years in business, Muriel and Jane’s has learned what products Cranbrook shoppers want to see, and now she sells more art, gifts and jewellery, as well as her popular home-wares.

She travels frequently to search for new product lines that you won’t find anywhere

else in Cranbrook.Similarly, Chantel said that Freyja also

carries brands that are unique to the store, but that it’s the boutique experience that shoppers love the most with both Muriel and Jane’s and Freyja under the same roof.

“We wanted to create a shopping expe-rience. Shopping should be fun. It’s a bou-tique experience,” said Chantel.

The stores are open Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

For the townSMan

With a brand new car for a hole-in-one prize on every hole this is one tournament you will not want to miss! Bos-ton Pizza Cranbrook and Northstar Motors Ltd. have joined forces for the third an-nual Par 3 Charity Golf tourna-ment on Friday, August 22 at the beautiful Cranbrook Golf Course.

This year the tournament will raise funds in support of the East Kootenay Foundation for Health (EKFH).

“We strongly believe in their mission to provide funding for the East Kootenay Regional Hospital and other community facilities and complementing the health care needs of our region,” said organizers Trevor Gordon, owner of Boston Pizza Cranbrook, and Pat Spring, general sales manager of Northstar Motors.

“This tournament is such a great way for us to combine our passion for the game of golf and raising money for a charity

that contributes so much to our community.”

Every hole on the 18-hole Cranbrook Golf Course will be transformed into a Par 3 with the hopes that some lucky golf-er will get a hole-in-one and win the brand new car courtesy of Northstar Motors Ltd. If we don’t see a hole-in-one there is still a closest to the pin prize on every hole.

Teams of four players will play a Texas Scramble format as they vie for one of the top three team prizes while being entertained on course by DJ Dougie, taking part in the Beat the Pro contest and the Bridge Interiors Putting contest.

Donna Grainger, EKFH ex-ecutive director shares, “The first two tournaments made a huge difference to the quality of health care at the regional hospital. Thanks to those who support this fundraiser and its amazing sponsors, Boston Pizza and Northstar Motors, the intensive care unit and di-agnostic imaging (mammogra-

phy) received significant fund-ing from results of the tourna-ments.”

This year’s event will focus on funding vital signs monitors for the East Kootenay Regional Hospital.

These monitors measure and display heart rate, breath-ing rate and blood pressure.

Registration forms for the tournament are available at Boston Pizza.

For any additional information or to sponsor, volunteer or register, you can contact Trevor at [email protected] or visit our website at : www.cranbrookcharitygolf.ca.

Chance to win a brand new car on every hole at charity tournament

Boston Pizza and Northstar GM are once again coming togeth-er to host a Par 3 Charity Golf Tournament.

Page 6: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

Page 6 Tuesday, JuLy 22, 2014

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daily townsman / daily bulletin

We’re all immigrants here in the East Kootenay. Some of us arrived much earlier than the others and, somehow, we all

became protective of the area, especially the mountains and the lovely lakes. We all become extremely protective and ‘not keen’ on others settling here.

My old friend Bill, although an immi-grant from Ontario, was aggressive towards those newcomers that had the audacity to encroach on what he be-lieved were his hunting ter-ritories and fishing creeks. I am not sure why he ac-cepted me, the late-com-ing Limey; he probably thought I was weird enough to be accepted as a local.

Anyway, when Bill died, his ashes were strewn high on the slopes of a mountain but then, when his grieving widow trav-elled there, up those winding roads, in order to commune with the spirit of her late husband, she was disturbed by a vehi-cle approaching.

“There I was, all alone with Bill,” she told me, “when up comes this Albertan pick-up. I didn’t know whether to laugh, cry or just swear.”

I was up in the Rockies with a newish friend called Sandy. He was, naturally, a Scot, dour too. We were bouncing along in my beat-up pick-up when we came to a creek crossing. We stopped to review our options.

But there was a jeep in the creek and beside it, shovelling frantically, was a sad fellow with a spade. Another man was sit-ting helplessly in the driver’s seat, probably beginning to get wet round his feet. A third guy was perched on a huge boulder like a baboon on a kopje and not being of any use at all.

I considered how we might be of help. “Don’t bother,” said Sandy, a very re-

cent immigrant. “They’re Albertans.”I think he really meant

what he was implying, but I persisted and, with my bat-tered assortment of just-in-case gear, we good Samari-tans finally rescued those tourists. I seem to recall that they did thank us.

Only yesterday, after a fine but very hot climb up into the Rockies above Wildhorse Creek, we were wending our way homeward, thinking of ice-creams and the air-conditioner.

My daughter Jill and her friend Matt were with me as we wended our weary way down the dusty forestry road and, round-ing a bend, found a vehicle parked in our way. I stopped and waited patiently and politely. There was an eerie lack of move-ment in the parked vehicle except for one hand that twitched slightly on a door han-dle.

I waited a little longer then, not wishing to blast my horn rudely, I stepped out to see what was going on.

It was an Albertan registration on a

newish vehicle, only a little smaller than a Greyhound Bus. I approached.

Meanwhile, Jill was almost having hys-terics at the sight of her venerable father hobbling over to that smart vehicle.

As I said before, it had been an extreme-ly hot day and, when we had at last got ourselves down to where we’d parked my truck, we went to the creek for a refreshing drink. As I have done so often on hot days, I hauled off my T-shirt, soaked it in icy water and draped it over my head.

So, when I hauled myself out of the truck in order to have a serious chat with those Albertans who were hindering my progress homeward, I must have been quite an apparition.

I still had on my mountain boots, the paint-stained, ripped pants I’d worn all day, and that wet T-shirt draped around my shoulders.

As is my wont, I wasn’t sporting my dentures, I hadn’t shaved for a few days and, according to Jill, my remaining hair was dishevelled.

Anyway, the surprised men in that vehi-cle stuttered that they were not in any trouble, merely checking a map. One man, in the driver’s seat, addressed me as ‘pard-ner’ then sped off as if the demons were on his tail.

“You sure got rid of them, Dad,” said Jill after she’d stopped laughing. “Bet they won’t stop till they’ve crossed Crows Nest Pass.”

I was wondering if my hair ever looked ‘hevelled’.

Running off ‘Berties’

Letters to the editorLetters to the Editor should be a maximum of 400 words in length. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contri-bution. All letters must include the name and daytime phone number of the writer for verification purposes. The phone number will not be printed. Anonymous letters will not be published. Only one letter per month from any particular letter writer will be published. Email letters to [email protected]. Mail to The Daily Townsman, 822 Cranbrook St. N., Cranbrook, B.C. V1C 3R9. In Kimberley, email [email protected]. Mail to The Daily Bulletin, 335 Spokane Street, Kimberley, BC V1A 1Y9.

Peter Warland

Page 7: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 2014 PAGE 7

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TRE VOR CR AWLEYSports Editor

Gary Elliot knew he had to do something dif-ferent.

The Unicorns FC goalkeeper was beaten four times in the shootout, but knew that a save would give his team the chance to win the ‘A’ division champi-onship game of the July-Fest soccer tournament.

“I had to change up what I was doing a bit,” said Elliot. “The lines-men don’t want you to jump off the line too much and I noticed a lot of the guys—where they were looking, were going the exact opposite—so I decided if I walk the line, then I’ll have a better chance to make the stop.”

The fifth and final shooter for the Montana Rapids stepped up, looked to the left corner, and shot towards the right side of the net.

Elliot dove and made the save.

The Unicorns, which had scored all four of their previous penalties, only needed Mike Hamm to bury the last one to win the title.

He booted a low shot into the left corner, and the Unicorns, along with their fans at the sidelines of the Purcell soccer

Unicorns win JulyFest tournament

JULYFEST SOCCER TOURNAMENT

TREVOR CRAWLEY PHOTO

The Unicorns FC won the competitive division of the JulyFest soccer tournament, scoring all five goals in a penalty shootout against the Montana Rapids after a 1-1 draw. Pictured above, back row left to right: Sheldon Vogt, Logan Vogt, Aaron Wagner, Kris Snopek, Dave Nesbitt, Jaron Broom, Ross Hartell, Adam Wagner, Jeff Hamm. Middle row, left to right: Jake Walmsley, Chris Rushworth, Patrick Webb, Mike Hamm. Front row, left to right: Tyler Oddy, Kru Huska, Pat Murphy, AJ Wheaton, Gary Elliot. Missing: Corey Moore, Sam Heap.

DAILY TOWNSMAN / DAILY BULLETIN

fields in Marysville, erupted in celebration.

Hamm was well aware of what was at stake when he stepped up to the ball.

“I was nervous,” he said, “but tried to get that out of the way because it’s all about confidence in penalty shots. You should score nine out of ten times on a penalty. It’s a big net.”

Elliot was named the MVP before AJ Wheaton accepted the Happy Hans trophy, which

hadn’t been captured by a Cranbrook team since 1997.

It was a Cinderel-la-story ending to a match that took a turn for the worse in the sec-ond half, after Corey Moore was red-cared upon receiving a contro-versial yellow card—his second of the game.

With roughly 15 min-utes remaining, the Uni-corns had to play a man down.

Still scoreless at that point, the Rapids took

advantage of their extra man, and were rewarded with the opening goal.

It was tough to swal-low, since the Unicorns had so many glorious chances all game to take the lead. Ross Hartell had put a header over the net, while Jake Walmsley rang a shot off the crossbar.

However, Walmsley eventually became the hero for the Unicorns late in the game, poking the ball across the line after the Rapids goalten-

der came out of his net for a challenge.

Knotted at 1-1 after full time, the game went directly to penalty kicks to decide the outcome. Walmsley, Wheaton, Hamm, Chris Rush-worth, and Jake Broom all converted their dot shots.

The Unicorns fin-ished the weekend on top of their pool with two wins and a draw. They won the quarterfinal 3-0 and advanced past the semifinal with a 1-0 win.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

THE BEST IN THE FEST: The Cranbrook Ramblers came out on top of the women’s ‘B’ division at the JulyFest soccer tournament, defeating a team out of Calgary 1-0 to clinch the title. The women won two out of three games on Saturday, and defeated the Lethbridge Bumblebee FC 3-0 on Sunday for a berth into the final.

TRE VOR CR AWLEYSports Editor

Tim Bozon is getting back into competitive hock-ey.

The Kootenay Ice import will be representing France at an U23 tournament in the Czech Republic that begins at the end of July.

Joining France at the tournament will be top club teams from the host country, Poland and Slovakia.

Bozon has been back on the ice and has resumed training following a battle with meningitis earlier in the year. A third-round draft pick of the Montreal Canadiens in 2012, Bozon was hospitalized in March during a road trip through Saskatchewan where he was diagnosed with a severe form of men-ingitis.

He was released after four weeks at Royal Univer-sity Hospital in Saskatoon, and promptly returned home to France to begin rehabilitation.

He came to the Kootenay Ice in a trade with the Kamloops Blazers last fall. In 203 WHL games, Bozon collected 105 goals and 231 points.

Bozon returning to competitive hockey

CHRIS PULLEN PHOTO/WWW.CRANBROOKHPHOTO.COM

Tim Bozon will be representing France at an upcoming U23 tournament in the Czech Republic.

Franson avoids arbitration, signs one-year deal with Leafs

C ANADIAN PRESSTORONTO - The Toronto Maple Leafs and Cody

Franson have avoided arbitration with a one-year contract worth US$3.3 million.

It’s the third straight one-year deal for Franson, who missed most of training camp last season after a contract dispute.

With this one, the 26-year-old gets a raise from the $2 million he made in 2013-14, when he led all Toronto defencemen with 33 points (five goals, 28 assists) and ranked second in the NHL in hits (282).

Franson, a third-round pick of the Nashville Predators in 2005, has 28 goals and 105 assists and a plus-eight rating in 322 career NHL games.

The six-foot-five 213-pound native of Sicamous, B.C., was acquired by the Maple Leafs along with Matthew Lombardi from the Predators on July 3, 2011 in exchange for Brett Lebda and Robert Slaney.

Page 8: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

PAGE 8 TUESDAY, JULY 22, 2014

COMICSANNIE’S MAILBOX

by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar

HOROSCOPESby Jacqueline Bigar

DAILY TOWNSMAN / DAILY BULLETIN

Tundra By Chad Carpenter

Garfield By Jim Davis

Hagar the Horrible By Dick Browne

Baby Blues By Kirkman and Scott

Rhymes with Orange By Hillary B. Price

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Initial confusion is likely to sub-side once you look at an issue as a control game or a power play. You will know exactly what to do and why you need to pro-ceed in this direction. A friend or loved one’s mental or phys-ical fatigue might be irritating. Tonight: Love the moment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might be evaluating the importance of continuing as you have been. A problem involving your family could arise. A pur-chase might be necessary, and it could force you to wait on a matter you have been pursuing. Tonight: Take a hard look at your budget. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will be heard, whether you are debating the pros and cons of an emotional situation or making plans for the weekend. Your sense of direction could be thrown off-kilter, but not for long. Schedule a meeting or make time for a discussion.

Tonight: Hang out with friends. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Take a back seat for the mo-ment. You will want to take action, but only after you feel as though you have a complete understanding of what is going on. You also might not have as firm a grasp on a money matter as you think you do. Tonight: Keep it relaxing. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Listen to news with a touch of cynicism, and you will be just fine. Go with the flow, and everything will fall right into place. A long-distance call could change your pace and your thoughts. Take another look at what is going on now. Tonight: Where your friends are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Others might not intend to drop the ball, but that is what happens. You could feel out of sorts when dealing with a new love interest. Logic will not work here. A partnership will be instrumental in making this situation work. Tonight: Say “thank you” over dinner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Reach out for more informa-tion. Someone you count on could present an alternative perspective. Do not make any snap judgments -- just listen. Something unexpected could throw you off. Tonight: No matter what you do, make sure there is great music around you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Deal with someone directly. You might not be as comfort-able with this person as you would like. Tension is likely to build when a project takes an unexpected turn. You might not know what to do. Just step back and observe for now. Tonight: Visit with a favorite person. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Defer to others, as you might have an exciting detour in your plans. Use caution with money, especially if someone tries to manipulate you into his or her type of thinking. A loved one could be delightful yet distract-ing. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Pace yourself, as you could have more to do than you originally

might have anticipated. A do-mestic matter is likely to cause some upset. Don’t worry -- you will handle it well. Use care when dealing with a grumpy friend. Tonight: Run errands first. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your playfulness will emerge. Your easygoing attitude could be distressing to someone who is determined to have a situa-tion work a certain way. Laugh-ter will surround an interaction involving a grumpy person. Tonight: Add more spice to a relationship. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You could be happier than you thought possible when you walk away from a controlling friend. Try to open up more, as you might be keeping a lot to yourself. Use good sense with a money matter. A return call could take too long for your taste. Tonight: At home. BORN TODAY Fashion designer Oscar de la Renta (1932), author Amy Vanderbilt (1908), actor Danny Glover (1946)

Dear Annie: We live five hours from our daughter, “Barbara,” her husband, “Seth,” and their two kids. We visit them once a year. Seth completely ignores us. The last time we arrived, our daughter and grandchildren hugged us, but Seth sat with his back to us. He didn’t even say hello. When my husband went to talk to him, Seth walked out of the room. Each time we go there, he becomes a little worse. We send him birthday and Christmas gifts, and he never responds. We have no idea why he hates us. When he does talk to us, he mostly discusses his new hob-by: shooting defenseless animals. He knows we are repulsed by this, yet he prattles on about how he plans to take his daughter with him on hunting trips. He seems to be a good father, although he is very condescending toward our daughter. Barbara claims that Seth is a terrific hus-band, and she loves being a stay-at-home mom. But she looks pale and thin and rarely smiles. We are worried about her. Maybe Barbara doesn’t want to ruin things for the kids, but honestly, we think she’s de-lusional. We love her, but don’t know how to change Seth’s attitude. Any ideas? -- Sad Grandparents Dear Sad: The fact that Seth likes to hunt is his business as long as he has the proper licenses. We don’t recommend you debate the issue, because you are unlikely to find common ground. We agree that he is rude, but unless Barbara can convince him to be more polite, it’s best to lower your expecta-tions and ignore his behavior. The more pressing issue is Barbara’s health. Is she truly too pale and thin, or are you projecting? If you believe there is abuse, report it to the authorities. Meanwhile, please reach out to your daughter without denigrating her husband, which will make her defend him. Ask how she’s feeling. Talk to her often. Invite her to bring the kids to visit you, with or without Seth. See for your-self what’s really going on. Dear Annie: I can’t remember the last time my wife and I were intimate. She even refus-es to snuggle in bed. It’s not about sex. She pushed me away so many times it put a knife through my heart. I finally gave up. If I try to talk about it, she becomes angry and refus-es to discuss it. She refuses counseling, too. We get along fine in other areas, but I guess that’s only a front. I tried counseling on my own and was told to decide whether to stay or move on. I have now found someone else. I talk to her online every day. We’ve hugged and kissed. I have fallen in love, and she says the same, but neither of us wants to destroy our families. Please tell all spouses, male or female, that sex doesn’t have to be the only part of intimacy. Show your spouse you love him or her. My heart is broken that I had to find someone else to fill that gap, but I have no intention of letting her go now. -- No Name Dear No Name: We appreciate your hon-esty, although cheating is not a satisfactory solution. Would it help if you told your wife exactly what she is risking? If she won’t lis-ten, show her this column. Explain that you will not ask for sex if she will simply show affection. (We realize this is not ideal, but it’s an improvement.) Women often don’t real-ize how much men need a physical touch to feel loved. Dear Annie: Many years ago, I was in the same position as “Busy Mom,” with five chil-dren, farm chores and a huge garden. My house looked lived-in, to say the least. One day, my wonderful aunt said to me, “Don’t worry, Marg. It’s clean dirt.” Bless her heart. -- Manitoba, Canada Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to [email protected], or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndi-cate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syn-dicate Web page at www.creators.com.COPYRIGHT 2014 CREATORS.COM

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TUESDAY, JULY 22, 2014 PAGE 9

PUZZLESDAILY TOWNSMAN / DAILY BULLETIN

Fill in the grid so that every row (nine cells wide), every column (nine cells tall) and every box (three cells by three cells) contain the digits 1 through 9 in

any order. There is only one solution for each puzzle.

PREV

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Tuesday Afternoon/Evening July 22 Cbk. Kim. 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 # # KSPS-PBS Georg Georg Arthur Wild News Busi PBS NewsHour Capone-Icon History Det Frontline Civil War Unt Charlie Rose $ $ CFCN Ellen Show News News CTV News etalk Theory Person-Interest Amazing Race Anger Gold News News Daily Mey % % KXLY-ABC Rachael Ray The Doctors News ABC News News Ent Insider Extreme Weight Loss Celeb.-Swap KXLY Kim & & KREM-CBS Dr. Phil Dr. Oz Show News CBS News Inside Ac NCIS NCIS: LA Person-Interest News Late _ _ KHQ-NBC Ellen Show Judge Judge News News News Million. J’pard Wheel Food Fighters America’s Got Talent News J. Fal ( ( TSN SportsCentre Hocke Pardon Poker Poker SportsCentre Record NASCAR SportsCentre SportsCentre ) ) NET Sportsnet Con. MLB Baseball From Rogers Centre in Toronto. MLB Baseball Sportsnet Con. Tour Blue + + GLOBAL BC Queen Latifah The Young News News News Hour Ent ET NCIS NCIS: LA (:01) Remedy News , , KNOW Olly Jelly Maya Arthur Martha Wild Hope-Wildlife Marine Mach. Churchill-War The Blood of the Rose Take Marine Mach. ` ` CBUT Heartland Dragons’ Den CBC CBC CBC Cor Mercer Gags Mercer 22 Min Arctic Air The National News Georg 1 M CICT The Young News News News News ET Ent (:01) Remedy NCIS NCIS: LA News Hour Fi ET The 3 O CIVT The Young News News News Hour ET Ent Remedy NCIS NCIS: LA News Hour ET The 4 6 YTV Squir Nerds Spong Chuck Par Spong As Witch Cook’d Under. Just Gags Gags Baby Boys Young Vam Haunt 6 . KAYU-FOX Steve Harvey Bethenny Two Two Simp Mod Theory Theory Family Brook New Mindy News Mod Arsenio Hall 7 / CNN Situa Cross E. B. OutFront Cooper 360 Special Report CNN Tonight Cooper 360 Special Report CNN Tonight Foren Foren 8 0 SPIKE Bar Rescue Wrath of the Titans Tattoo Wrath of the Titans Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Res 9 1 HGTV Bryan Bryan Bryan Bryan Hunt Hunt Decks Decks Decke Decke Hunt Hunt Decks Decks Decke Decke Ext. Homes : 2 A&E Stor Stor Stor Stor Stor Stor Stor Stor Ship Ship Stor Stor Stor Stor Stor Stor Ship Ship < 4 CMT CMT’s Hottest: Gags Gags Wipeout Big Redneck Ship Ship Rules Rules Big Redneck Ship Ship Rules Rules = 5 W Plain Truth Undercover Property Bro Love It-List It Buying Property Bro Buying Buying Property Bro ? 9 SHOW Rookie Blue Vikings The Rival Rookie Blue Lost Girl NCIS NCIS NCIS: LA @ : DISC How/ How/ Mighty Ships Ice Cold Gold Deadliest Deadly Catch Game Stones Deadliest Deadly Catch Bering Gold A ; SLICE Debt Debt Prop Prop Millionaire Thicke Thicke Housewives Debt Debt Thicke Thicke Housewives Big Brother B < TLC Ex Ex Bakery Rescue Baker Baker TBA Baker TBA Baker Bakery Rescue C = BRAVO The Listener Flashpoint Blue Bloods Saving Hope Perception The Listener Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Saving Hope D > EA2 The ’Burbs (4:50) The Wiz (:05) Howard the Duck Muppets Take (:35) Moscow on the Hudson Pecker E ? TOON Ben 10 Tenkai Jim Rocket Johnny Johnny Adven Camp Pack Johnny Total Total Family Amer. Archer Robot Ftur Fugget F @ FAM Santa Dog Liv- Dog Phineas, Ferb Playlist Austin Christmas-Krank Shake Win Really Good Good Wiz Derek G A WPCH Middle Mod Theory Theory Brown Payne Brown Payne Mod Sein Family Family Amer. Amer. Jeffer. Jeffer. The Score H B COM Sein Sein Gas Theory Parks Theory Match Match Just/Laughs Gags Gags JFL Simp Theory Sulli Daily Colbert I C TCM Rachel Robert Mitchum The Immortal Sergeant (:45) Buffalo Bill McLintock! Deadly Comp. K E OUT Mantracker Stor Stor Stor Stor The Happen Stor Stor Stor Stor The Happen Stor Stor Ghost Hunters L F HIST Sky Jumpers Metal MASH MASH Pickers Restoration Cnt. Cnt. Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Yukon Gold M G SPACE Inner Scare Castle Stargate SG-1 Face Off Paranormal Wi. Inner Castle Star Trek: Voy. Star Trek: Next Face N H AMC (3:30) Crimson Tide The Lost World: Jurassic Park The Lost World: Jurassic Park Crimson Tide O I FS1 Pregame MLB Mo ARCA Series Racing MLB FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports P J DTOUR Disas Disas Trashopolis Museum Se Declassified Mysteries at Ghost Adv. Declassified Mysteries at Ghost Adv. W W MC1 (3:05) Sinister (4:55) Samsara Takedown (:10) All Is Lost The Impossible My Awkward ¨ ¨ KTLA Cunningham Maury Family Family News News Two Two Arrow Supernatural KTLA 5 News News Ar ≠ ≠ WGN-A Funny Videos Funny Videos District 9 Man Mother Mother Mother Mother Mother Parks Rock Sunny Ø Ø EA1 Pol Mad Max 2 (:10) Lost Song The Chronicles of Riddick RoboCop Matrix Reload ∂ ∂ VISN Emily of Moon Murder, She... Eas Ab Fab Loving Evangeline Emily of Moon The Republic of Love Ab Fab Popoff 102 102 MM VideoFlow VideoFlow VideoFlow De Cleve Drunk Nathan Ugly Bounty Conan Com Prince Drunk Nathan 105 105 SRC Question à 10 Cap sur l’été Paquet TJ C.-B. Sque Monde Vengeance Pénélope TJ TJ C.- Cap sur l’été

Wednesday Afternoon/Evening July 23 Cbk. Kim. 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 # # KSPS-PBS Georg Georg Arthur Wild News Busi PBS NewsHour My Wild Affair NOVA Sex in the Wild Life-Cold Charlie Rose $ $ CFCN Ellen Show News News CTV News etalk Theory Motive So You Think You Can Dance News News Daily Mey % % KXLY-ABC Rachael Ray The Doctors News ABC News News Ent Insider Middle Gold Mod Middle Motive KXLY Kim & & KREM-CBS Dr. Phil Dr. Oz Show News CBS News Inside Ac Big Brother Extant Criminal Minds News Late _ _ KHQ-NBC Ellen Show Judge Judge News News News Million. J’pard Wheel America’s Got Talent Taxi Brooklyn News J. Fal ( ( TSN SportsCentre Soccer Soccer SportsCentre Amazing Race SportsCentre SportsCentre ) ) NET Sportsnet Con. MLB Baseball From Rogers Centre in Toronto. MLB Baseball Sportsnet Con. Tour Blue + + GLOBAL BC Queen Latifah The Young News News News Hour Ent ET Big Brother Extant Rookie Blue News , , KNOW Olly Jelly Maya Arthur Martha Wild Marine Mach. Canada Bombay La Boheme Canada ` ` CBUT Heartland Dragons’ Den CBC CBC CBC Cor 22 Min Gags Dragons’ Den Republic-Doyle The National News Georg 1 M CICT The Young News News News News ET Ent Rookie Blue Big Brother Extant News Hour Fi ET The 3 O CIVT The Young News News News Hour ET Ent Rookie Blue Big Brother Extant News Hour ET The 4 6 YTV Squir Chuck Spong Nerds Par Spong Haunt Witch Japan Cache Just Gags Gags Baby Boys Young Vam Haunt 6 . KAYU-FOX Steve Harvey Bethenny Two Two Simp Mod Theory Theory So You Think You Can Dance News Mod Arsenio Hall 7 / CNN Situa Cross E. B. OutFront Cooper 360 Anthony CNN Tonight Cooper 360 Anthony CNN Tonight Foren Foren 8 0 SPIKE Cops Jail Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Jail Police Videos Police Videos Police Videos 9 1 HGTV Decke Decke Decke Decke Hunt Hunt Prop Prop Flipping Out Hunt Hunt Prop Prop Flipping Out Home Strange : 2 A&E Duck Big Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Big Big Big Big Duck Duck Duck Duck Big Big < 4 CMT Wipeout Gags Gags Undercover Tori J. Me Reba Reba Reba Tori J. Me Reba Reba Reba = 5 W (3:00) Rivals Undercover Property Bro Love It-List It Love It-List It Love It Cedar Cove The Audience Love It-List It ? 9 SHOW Rookie Blue Vikings Lost Girl Remedy NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS: LA @ : DISC How/ How/ Don’t Drive Fool’s Fool’s Deadly Catch Afraid Overhaulin’ Fool’s Fool’s Highway Thru Afraid A ; SLICE Debt Debt Prop Prop Millionaire Dance Moms Dance Moms Debt Debt Dance Moms Dance Moms Big Brother B < TLC Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You Who Do You C = BRAVO The Listener Flashpoint Blue Bloods Suits Graceland The Listener Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Suits D > EA2 Fa Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner ReGenesis Eve & the Fire Horse Grumpy Old Men (:45) Grumpier Old Men Lethal E ? TOON Ben 10 Tenkai Jim Groj. Johnny Johnny Adven Rocket Pack Johnny Total Total Family Amer. Archer Robot Ftur Fugget F @ FAM Wiz Dog Liv- Jessie Mighty Mighty Mighty Mighty Mighty Mighty Austin Shake Win Really Good Good Wiz Derek G A WPCH Middle Mod Theory Theory Brown Payne Brown Payne Mod Sein Family Family Amer. Amer. Jeffer. Jeffer. Bridget Jones H B COM Sein Sein Gas Theory Parks Sulli Match Match Just/Laughs Gags Gags JFL Simp Theory Theory Daily Colbert I C TCM Three Daring Daughters Bullitt (:15) The Treasure of the Sierra Madre Belle de Jour Blow-Up K E OUT Mantracker Stor Stor Stor Stor Be Alive Stor Stor Stor Stor Be Alive Stor Stor Ghost Hunters L F HIST Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn MASH MASH Pickers Pawn Pawn Amer Amer Pawn Pawn Miracles Decd. Yukon Gold M G SPACE Inner Scare Castle Stargate SG-1 Sharktopus Inner Castle Star Trek: Voy. Star Trek: Next Shark N H AMC (3:00) X2: X-Men United Hitman Behind Enemy Lines II (:01) Eragon X2 O I FS1 NASCAR Hub NASCAR Racing Setup NASCAR Racing Soccer FOX Sports FOX Sports P J DTOUR Disas Disas Gotta Gotta Live Live Coast Coast Wat Wat Ghost Adv. Coast Coast Wat Wat Ghost Adv. W W MC1 Step (:20) Magic Mike (:15) Collaborator (:45) The Words Kill Your Darlings (:15) Battleship ¨ ¨ KTLA Cunningham Maury Family Family News News Two Two Arrow The 100 KTLA 5 News News Ar ≠ ≠ WGN-A Funny Videos Funny Videos Man Rules Rules Rules Rules Rules Rules Rules Rules Mother Mother Mother Rock Sunny Ø Ø EA1 River Runs (4:55) Stand by Me (:25) Blue State Return to Paradise The River Wild Spartacus ∂ ∂ VISN Emily of Moon Murder, She... Eas Wine The Paradise The Syndicate Emily of Moon Dear Frankie Super Popoff 102 102 MM VideoFlow VideoFlow VideoFlow Simp Cleve Bang! Bang! Amy Amy Conan Com Prince Bang! Bang! 105 105 SRC Miss M Cap sur l’été Paquet TJ C.-B. Sque Épi Séduction Pénélope TJ TJ C.- Cap sur l’été CALL 426-3272

OR VISITwww.tribute.ca

for this week’s movie listings

ADVERTISINGOPPORTUNITYA powerful tool when you want to reach your potential customers – the Daily Townsman and Daily Bulletin are invited into over 6,900 homes every day, Monday to Friday.

To advertise or subscribe in Cranbrook, 250-426-5201, ext 0

To advertise or subscribe in Kimberley 250-427-5333 • 10:00-4:30

250-426-5201www.dailytownsman.com

250-427-5333www.dailybulletin.ca

Something’s been puzzling me.Q. How can I get advertising for my business so it’s covered in both newspaper and online media for one great price?A. If you live in Cranbrook area, call 250-426-5201, then press ext. 214 and speak with Erica.

She has all the pieces to your puzzle!

1109a Baker St. CranbrookTRENDS N’ TREASURES1109a Baker Street, Cranbrook

250-489-2611 [email protected]

ChristmasIn July!

TRENDS N’TREASURES

250.426.6671www.kootenaywinecrafters.com

44 - 6th Ave. South,Cranbrook, BC

Behind Integra Tire on Van Horne

KOOTENAYW I N E C R A F T E R SKO O T E NAYW I N E C R A F T E R S

GREAT SELECTION OF WINE KITS,

WINE MAKING ACCESSORIES

AND GIFTWAREGift Certi� cates

Available!

1109a Baker St. CranbrookTRENDS N’ TREASURES1109a Baker Street, Cranbrook

250-489-2611 [email protected]

what’s new In our home decor

departmentdepartment

TRENDS N’TREASURESBaker St. Mall 250.489.8464

Assorted Styles,

Colours & Sizes!

JOCKEY CLASSICS AND HANNA

BRIEFS

Protect our earth.The Cranbrook Daily Townsman and the

Kimberley Daily Bulletin promote recycling.

We use vegetable-based inks, and our newsprint, tin and aluminum waste is recycled.

Page 10: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

PAGE 10 TUESDAY, JULY 22, 2014 DAILY TOWNSMAN / DAILY BULLETIN PAGE 10 Tuesday, July 22, 2014 DAILY TOWNSMAN/DAILY BULLETIN

bcclassifi ed.comfax 250.426.5003 email classifi [email protected]

250.426.5201 ext 202

Your community. Your classifi eds. Share Your Smiles!

Drop off your photo and name(s) of subject at the Cranbrook Townsman

or Kimberley Bulletin offi ce or email your high-resolution jpeg to [email protected]. Photographs will appear in the

order they are received.

Keira is smiling with her tongue out cause shes eing chee

In times of grief, these caring professionals are here to serve and comfort your family.

Sympathy & Understanding

2200 - 2nd Street SouthCranbrook, BC V1C 1E1

250-426-3132

1885 Warren AvenueKimberley, BC V1A 1R9

250-427-7221www.mcphersonfh.com

Kootenay Monument Installations

6379 HIGHWAY 95ATA TA CREEK, B.C. 1-800-477-9996

Granite & Bronze Memorials, Dedication Plaques,

Benches, Memorial Walls, Gravesite Restorations,

Sales & Installations

www.kootenaymonument.ca

IN-HOME CONSULTATION OR VISIT OUR SHOWROOM

End of Life?Bereaved?

May We Help?

250-417-2019Toll Free 1-855-417-2019

Your community foundation.

Investing in community for good and forever.250.426.1119 www.cranbrookcf.ca

We build endowment funds that benefit the community forever and

help create personal legacies

INDEX IN BRIEFFAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTSTRAVEL

CHILDRENEMPLOYMENT

BUSINESS SERVICESPETS & LIVESTOCK

MERCHANDISE FOR SALEREAL ESTATE

RENTALSAUTOMOTIVE

ADULT ENTERTAINMENTLEGAL NOTICES

AGREEMENTIt is agreed by any display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement.

bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition.

bcclassified.com reserves the right to revised, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisement and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATIONAdvertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHTCopyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

ON THE WEB:

Journeyman Technician

Melody Motors in Kimberley, BC has an immediate opening for one Journeyman Technician. Hours are Monday to Friday, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm with your weekends

free to enjoy with your family. We provide a comprehensive benefit plan. Please

send or fax your resume attention:

Steve Murphy, Service Manager

Phone 1-888-703-2211Fax 250-427-4188

DL#5248

250-427-4224 • Toll Free 888-703-2211 Sales: M-F 8-5:30 / SAT 9-5 • Parts & Service: M-F 7:30-5

$40 PER HOUR!

DEVELOPMENT FORESTERGrand Forks Division

Interfor Corporation is a growth-oriented lumber company with operations in Canada and the United States. The Company has annual production capacity of more than 2.6 billion board feet and offers one of the most diverse lines of lumber products to customers around the world. For more information about Interfor, visit our website at www.interfor.com.

Interfor is currently recruiting for a Development Forester in Grand Forks, British Columbia. Grand Forks is the heart of the Boundary Country nestled in the Southern Interior of Beautiful BC minutes from the US Border. This is a terri c opportunity to work in beautiful location with great ber supply and a progressive management team.

Reporting to the Woods Manager, the successful applicant will be primarily responsible for supporting the business aspects of Standing Timber Inventory (STI) Development.

The ideal candidate will possess the following preferred skills and quali cations:

You will be a highly motivated team player, with strong communication and interpersonal skills and a proven track record on safety.

The successful candidate would have post-secondary education and RFP designation, with a minimum 3 years of experience in all aspects of cutting permit development.

To express interest in this opportunity, please apply online at www.interfor.com/careers

We appreciate the interest of all applicants, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. All applicants offered a position must successfully complete a pre-employment background check.

Invest your future with oneof the world’s largest lumber companies

Personals

KOOTENAY’S BEST ESCORTS

Introducing:

New: Scarlet - 34, Foxy redhead, slim & curvy

New: Alexis - 25, Slim, sassy brunette

Lily - 24, Curvy, blonde

beauty, G.F.E.

Brianna - 45, Busty, best legs, pleaser

Enjoy quality relaxations by our hand-picked beauty’s

Swedish relaxation/massage.

Spoil yourself today!!!

(250)417-2800in/out calls daily

Hiring ObituariesHelp Wanted

Career Opportunities

Obituaries

Passed away in St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver on July 3, 2014, at the age of 70 years.Beloved mother of Christopher and dear sister of Ann (Alf) and Richard (Sharyn-Lee). Aunt Jean will be sadly missed by her 7 nieces and nephews. She had many close friends who were so much a part of her life.A Celebration of Life will be held at the Kimberley United Church on Saturday, July 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. A Luncheon will follow.Memorial donations can be made to the Diabetic Assoc. of Canada.

ObituaryHALL, Gloria Jean

(Hofland)

InformationCANADA BENEFIT Group - Do you or someone you know suffer from a disability? Get up to $40,000 from the Canadian Government. Toll-free 1-888-511-2250 or visit us online: www.canadabenefi t.ca.

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Personals

DAZZLING BLONDE

Busty, blue-eyed beauty

Leanne, 40

*** 250-421-0059 ***

Lost & FoundFOUND. BIKE near skate park in Kimberley. Call to identify. 250-427-7771

LOST: LADIES wallet, in Kimberley, July 12th-13th week-end. If found, please call 250-427-7771

TravelFOUNTAIN OF Youth Spa and RV Resort Offers more vacation for less money, hot mineral springs, events, ac-tivities, fi tness, entertainment. www.foyspa.com or 888-800-0772.

Children

Daycare Centers

FULL-TIME or PART-TIME spot available in

Registered Daycare for children aged 0-5 years.

Please call (250)581-1328

Business Opportunities

GET FREE vending machines. Can earn $100,000 + per year. All cash-retire in just 3 years. Protected Territories. Full de-tails call now 1-866-668-6629. Website www.tcvend.com.

Education/Trade Schools

APARTMENT/CONDOMANAGER TRAINING

• Certifi ed Home Study

Course• Jobs

RegisteredAcross Canada• Gov. Certifi ed

www.RMTI.ca / 604.681.5456 or 1.800.665.8339

Obituaries

Education/Trade Schools

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION is an in-demand career in Canada! Employers have work-at-home positionsavailable. Get the online train-ing you need from an employ-er-trusted program. Visit:CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-888-528-0809 to start training for your work-at-home career to-day!

Help WantedAn Alberta Oilfi eld Company is hiring experienced dozer and excavator operators, meals and lodging provided. Drug testing required. 1-(780)723-5051.

NEW MAY MAY Restaurantneeds mature waiters or waitresses.

Please call 250-489-6118 or bring resume to

808 Cranbrook St. N.

Obituaries

Our classifi ed ads are on the net! Check it out atwww.bcclassified.com

Page 11: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 2014 PAGE 11DAILY TOWNSMAN / DAILY BULLETINDAILY TOWNSMAN/DAILY BULLETIN Tuesday, July 22, 2014 PAGE 11

Janis Caldwell-SawleyMortgage SpecialistRoyal Bank of Canada

[email protected]/janis.sawley

Serving the East Kootenays Tel.: 250-417-1336

4:30 - 6:00pm 520 Hurry Ave. NW

$205,000Great home in a quiet neighbourhood

with 3 bdrms, 1½ baths, finished bsmt, shop, covered parking & more!

2398616 Joy

E a c h o f f i c e i n d e p e n d e n t l y o w n e d a n d o p e r a t e d .BLUE SKY REALTY

250-426-87001111 Cranbrook St. N. www.blueskyrealty.ca

www.realtor.ca

OPEN HOUSE Wednesday July 23

Employment

Trades, Technical

Join one of North America’s most respected & fastest growing heavy civil infra-structure contractors.

Flatiron has been named Heavy Civil Contractor of the Year in Alberta & has won numerous employer awards.

Flatiron Constructors has an immediate need for:

• Formwork Carpenters• Apprentice Carpenters• Skilled Laborers• Grade Checkers• Heavy Equipment Operators

This is an opportunity to join us in the Edmonton Area. The Northeast Anthony Hen-day Drive project includes the construction of 27 kms of six and eight-lane divided roadway, nine interchanges, two fl yovers, eight rail cross-ing & two bridges across the North Saskatchewan River.

You can view all skilled trade and construction management positions

and apply viawww.fl atironcorp.com

or forward your resume: canadarecruiter@fl atironcorp.com

Build The Best.Be The Best!

DRIVERS & Owner Operators(Teams & Singles)

Safety Conscious, Profes-sional Drivers Req. 5-8 Axle End Dump Confi gurations. Min. 3 years winter mountain driving &/or construction trucking exp. Must be self-motivated, mechanically in-clined, effi cient, accountable & a team player.

$70,000+/year +Bonuses & Benefi ts!Send resume, current

abstract & indicate [email protected]

Fax: (1)403-236-8216

Employment

GOLD CREEK MARKET has F/T & P/T afternoon

positions available.Afternoon Shift: (2:30pm - 10:30pm) available immediately. Daily tasks in-clude cooking evening menu items, preparing for the follow-ing day, general cleaning, performing inventory checks, serving customers, selling; lottery tickets, propane, fuel alcohol and cigarettes, using a computerized Point of Sale system with interact machine, facing shelves, stocking shelves and performing nightly closing activities. Food Safe Certifi cate, Lottery training and Propane training will be necessary once hired. Must be 19 years of age or older. $12.00/hr. Apply in per-son with a full resume. Please include references.

2455 - 30th Ave S., Cranbrook, BC V1C 6Z4

SERVING ALLTHE KOOTENAYS

POWERPAVING

NOTICE

BLACKTOPNOW!

NO JOB TOO SMALL

Driveways & Parking Lots

1-888-670-0066CALL 421-1482FREE ESTIMATES!

CALL NOW!

• Construction • Renovations • Roofing • Drywall-large or small• Siding • Sundeck Construction

• Aluminum Railings We welcome any restorational work!

(250) 426-8504

GIRO

Employment

Help Wanted

NOW HIRING FULL & PART

TIME CASHIERS Drop off resumé at Petro-Can in

Marysville.

250-427-2000

Employment

Help WantedEXPERIENCED PARTS per-son required for a progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wag-es, full benefi ts and RRSP bo-nuses working 5 day work week, plus moving allowanc-es. Our 26,000ft2 store is lo-cated 2.5 hours N.E. of Ed-monton, Alberta. See our community at LacLaBicheRe-gion.com. Send resume to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: [email protected].

FIVE Full Time, Permanent Housekeeping Room Atten-dants required by 611017 BC Ltd DBA Holiday Inn Express in Golden-Kicking Horse, BC Compensation: $14.00 hourly, 40 hours per week Education: High School Experience in re-lated fi eld an asset; Job Du-ties: Make beds, clean/disin-fect bathroom/fi xtures, Stock linen closet and supplies area, Vacuum carpets and mop fl oors. Wash windows, pick up debris and remove trash from units, Provide information on facilities and handle com-plaints. Location: Mail- PO Box 1462, 1120 14th St, Golden, BC V0A 1HO E-mail: [email protected] Fax: 1-250-344-4665

Medical/DentalFull time Certifi ed Dental As-sistant required for team orien-tated family dental practice. Awesome wage and benefi ts package. Apply by resume to: 121 N. 1st Avenue, Williams Lake, BC V2G 1Y7, Fax: (250)398-8633 or by E-mail:[email protected] Visit our website: www.cariboodentalclinic.com

Drivers/Courier/Trucking

Contractors

Open Houses

Mortgages

Services

Financial ServicesGET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB.

1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

Merchandise for Sale

Building SuppliesEcon-O-Watt, 34 watt, 48 inch, T12. 10 per package - 2 packages for $20.Wrap Lite Model 3280, GESB 48”, Lithonia fl ourescent. 9 packages for $180.

Please call Sherry at: 250-829-0593

Furniture

Good condition and cleaned.

Asking $400Phone: 250-427-3405

Cell: 250-919-6055Marysville

POWER LIFT RECLINER

Misc. for SaleSTEEL BUILDINGS/metal buildings 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for bal-ance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206 or visit us online at: www.crownsteelbuildings.ca.STEEL BUILDINGS. Summer meltdown sale! 20x20 $5,419. 25x26 $6,485. 30x30 $8,297. 32x34 $9,860. 40x48 $15,359. 47x68 $20,558. Front & back wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 or visit online: www.pioneersteel.ca

Open Houses

Mortgages

Merchandise for Sale

Misc. for SaleA- STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS

Used 20’40’45’ 53’ and insulated containers all

sizes in stock. SPECIAL

Trades are welcome.40’ Containers under $2500! DMG 40’ containers under

$2,000 each.Also JD 544 &644 wheel

Loaders Wanted to buy 300 size

hydraulic excavator Ph Toll free 1-866-528-7108

Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

A- STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS

Used 20’40’45’ 53’ and insulated containers all

sizes in stock. SPECIAL

Trades are welcome.40’ Containers under $2500! DMG 40’ containers under

$2,000 each.Also JD 544 &644 wheel

Loaders Wanted to buy 300 size

hydraulic excavator Ph Toll free 1-866-528-7108

Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Misc. WantedCollector Buying Coin Collec-tions, Native Art, Estates,Gold, Silver + 778-281-0030

FIREARMS. ALL types want-ed, estates, collections, single items, military. We handle all paperwork and transportation. Licensed Dealer. 1-866-960-0045. www.dollars4guns.com.

Real Estate

Lots2.5 ACRE LOTS, LUMBY, BC Mabel Estates 5 mins from town, pristine lush views. De-signed and ready to build. Wells & power at lot. Starting, $139,000, $50,000 below as-sessed value. 250-317-2807.

Rentals

Homes for Rent

BC Housing Cranbrook has exciting rental

opportunities for families looking for affordable

housing. The 3-bedroom units we offer are spacious

with 1.5 bathroom stove fridge and washer/

dryer hook-ups. One small pet is allowed, with BC Housing approval. No

smoking is allowed. Tenants pay 30% of their gross

monthly income for rent. For applications please call

250-489-2630 or 1-800-834-7149 or go on-line to

www.bchousing.org

Suites, Upper

Kimberley Studio Suite. Furnished, $495./mo. in-cludes utilities, basic cable and internet. Sorry, no pets, no smoking. References and application required.

Call Peter at East Kootenay Realty

~ 250-908-0045 ~

TransportationAuto

Accessories/Parts

SET OF 4 SUMMER TIRES ON RIMS. P225/60R17 on 6 bolt rims. $300 obo. Call (250)489-8389.

Auto Financing

Transportation

Cars - Domestic

Sunroof and automatic car starter, FWD,

standard transmission.

2003 Hyundai Accent

Asking $2,800 Please call

(250) 421-0633 for inquiries.

2005 BUICK ALURE. Low km:133,600, $6,900 with winter tires. Phone (250)427-4612 or (250)427-4562 view at 111 Norton Ave. Kimberley.

MotorcyclesCURRENT GAS GAS Enduro Motorcycles for sale. Contact (250)427-7690,m e a d o w b r o o k m o t o r s @ h o t -mail.com or stop in at Meadow-brook Motors in Kimberley.CURRENT SHERCO Enduro 2 & 4 Stroke Motorcycles for sale. Used demos also available. Contact (250)427-7690,[email protected],or stop in at Meadowbrook Motors in Kimberley.

Recreational/Sale

Like new. 3 slide-outs, cherry cabinets, island

counter, pantry, AC, queen bed, table & chairs, full shower, power awning,

double pane tinted windows, many more extras. Will move

to sell in Calgary in Aug.

Asking $32,000

(250) 427-2019

2012 SUNDANCE 2900MK, 5TH WHEEL

Sport Utility Vehicle

FOR SALE

2008 EQUINOX SPORT TOWING

VEHICLE (122,000 kms)

$12,500 250-349-5306

2003 CHRYSLERTOWN AND COUNTRY

VAN.

190,000 kms, runs excellent, fully loaded.

Asking $5,500 OBO

250-426-2468 after 6pm

TRY A CLASSIFIED AD

CLEAN HOME

Full Housekeeping Services

Bondable, references.

Call Suzanne 250-921-9748

ELABORATE LAWN SERVICES

• Lawn and yard care• Tree and shrub pruning• Garden preparation• Yard clean-up

Serving Cranbrook and surrounding area

Call Jack250-426-6254

HOUSEKEEPING HOUSEKEEPING

Janet ~ 250-489-8889

Jeannie ~ 250-417-9013

RESIDENTIAL HOUSEKEEPING

SERVICES

SONNY & CHRIS NOMLAND

We rebuild Electrolux vacuums to

like-new condition.

We also repair all other brands.

Phone 250-489-2733

IS YOUR COMPUTER SLUGGISH OR HAVING

PROBLEMS?

It’s time for a tune-up! Why unplug everything, send away & wait when

SuperDave comes into your home?

Specializes in: *Virus/Spyware Removal,

*Troubleshooting, *Installations,

*PC Purchase Consulting.

SuperDave offers affordable, superior service

& most importantly; Honesty. SuperDave works Satur-

days & evenings too!

Call SuperDave (250)421-4044

www.superdaveconsult-ing.ca

LEAKY BASEMENT

• Foundation Cracks

• Damp Proofi ng

• Drainage Systems

• Foundation Restoration

Residential / CommercialFree estimates

250-919-1777

TOM’S LAWN CARE SERVICES

Cutting, trimming, hauling to dump. Seniors discount.

Free estimates, Marysville, Meadowbrook and

Kimberley.

(250) 427-5139 leave message.

PLAN DESIGNNew construction,

Additions, Renovations, Electrical, Landscape

Start with a good set of plans and be assured your investment will

FEEL, FUNCTION and LOOK GREAT!

Jody ~ 250-919-1575www.CHARLTONHOMES.CA

TIP TOP CHIMNEYSERVICES

“Sweeping the Kootenay’s Clean”

Chimney SweepingFireplace & Woodstove

ServicingVisual Inspections and

InstallationsGutter Cleaning Available

Call for Free Estimatefrom a W.E.T.T Certifi ed

Technician

Richard Hedrich250-919-3643

[email protected]

TRIPLE J WINDOW CLEANING

~residential~

For a brighter outlook, call Jim Detta

250-349-7546

SERVICES GUIDEContact these business for all your service needs!

To advertise using our “SERVICES GUIDE” in the Cranbrook Daily Townsman, Kimberley Daily Bulletin and The Valley, call us at 250-426-5201, ext. 202.

Page 12: Cranbrook Daily Townsman, July 22, 2014

PAGE 12 TUESDAY, JULY 22, 2014

NEWSDAILY TOWNSMAN / DAILY BULLETIN

HENDERSON, Catherine Jeanette

“C.J.” April 27, 1941 - July 16, 2014

Catherine Jeanette “C.J.” Henderson passed away peacefully on Wednesday, July 16, 2014 surrounded by her loving family.Born C.J. Colquhoun on April 27, 1941 in Toney River, Nova Scotia. After graduating from Pictou

Academy High School in 1958, C.J. went on to graduate in nursing from Aberdeen Hospital in 1961. During her nursing training, she secretly eloped and married the lover of her life, David Henderson in 1960.In 1965, with little money, few belongings, and three young children, C.J. and Dave headed west to B.C. for a new life and settled in Cranbrook where she worked at the Cranbrook Hospital. Four years later, the family moved to Wycliffe Park and resided there for seventeen years. C.J.’s fondest memories were at Wycliffe Park and she enjoyed many happy summers around her pool and loved it when friends and neighbours would stop by for a swim. Even though she considered B.C. her true home, she was always proud of her maritime heritage.C.J. continued her nursing at the hospital and later went on to be a big part of the home care nursing program. She was driven, had a strong work ethic, and was never afraid to storm into the doctor’s lounge and speak her mind. “Surely in arguing she had her skill, for even when vanquished she would argue still.”Her passion as a nurse carried over with her diagnosis this past spring, and as her illness progressed, it was her hope that her knowledge and experience in the medical field, along with her sometimes brutal honesty, would encourage positive changes in palliative care. C.J. handled her illness with unbelievable composure right up to her final few days.C.J. was the proud mother to Megan (Chris Obst), Grant (Shannon), and Robin (Geoff) MacLeod, and grandmother to Freddie and Oscar Obst, Colby and Danni Henderson, and Marty, Wyatt, and Hayden MacLeod. She is also survived by her two sisters Elaine (Aubrey) MacLeod and Jackie (Eric) Ross, both of Nova Scotia. C.J. was pre-deceased by her husband Dave and parents John and Violet Colquhoun.C.J. could not express enough how much she loved her family and how much of an inspiration her husband and kids were to her.In lieu of flowers, donations in C.J.’s memory may be made to Family Palliative Room c/o East Kootenay Foundation for Health, #13-24th Ave. North, Cranbrook, B.C. V1C 3H9.Drop in between 1 and 3 o’clock for an informal celebration of life at the upper level of Wycliffe Park on Friday, July 25, 2014.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALParks and Recreation Master Plan

The City is seeking proposals from quali� ed proponents for the development of a ten year Parks and Recreation Master Plan.

Proposal documents are available from the City’s web site under “Business – City Tenders”.

The sealed proposals, clearly marked, should be addressed:

“Request for Proposal – CRA2014-R-003 – Parks and Recreation Master Plan” and must be received by Friday, August 22, 2014, no later than 2:30 pm local time by the of� ce of:The Corporation of the City of CranbrookAttention: Melissa Smith, Financial Services Manager40 10th Avenue SouthCranbrook, BCV1C 2M8

Late submissions will be rejected.

The City reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals submitted.

LEE-ANNE GOODMANCanadian Press

OTTAWA — The RCMP provided fresh details Monday of its 31 fraud charges against Sen. Mike Duffy, accus-ing him of charging tax-payers for personal trav-el to funerals and for services from four peo-ple, including an Ottawa personal trainer.

A new court filing al-leges “inappropriate ex-pense claims associated with personal atten-dance at funeral and re-lated ceremonies.’’

According to the court documents, Duffy filed five separate ex-pense claims that the RCMP alleges involved personal or partisan

travel. The claims were filed from June 2009 to September 2012.

Duffy is also accused of fraudulently award-ing a $65,000 contract to his longtime friend, Gerald Donohue. The RCMP allege that Dono-hue, in turn, paid some of that money to three other people, including a personal trainer.

Donohue has already told investigators that he did “no tangible work’’ for the money.

The RCMP an-nounced last week it was charging Duffy with 31 criminal counts relat-ed to his expense claims, accusing him of mis-spending more than $200,000.

The charges stem from the disgraced sen-ator’s housing and travel expenses, and a $90,000 payment from Nigel Wright, the former chief of staff to Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Duffy has denied any criminal wrongdoing. Neither Duffy nor his lawyer, Donald Bayne, would comment on the new information, refer-ring the news media to a statement released last week, when the RCMP first laid the charges.

The Conserva-tive-appointed senator is to appear in court Sept. 16.

The NDP’s Peter Ju-lian says as more details emerge about Duffy’s alleged crimes, the questions reach all the way to Harper’s office. He says it’s time for the prime minister to “come clean.’’

“As more of the de-tails come out, Canadi-ans are asking: ‘What does and what did the prime minister know,

and when did he know it?’ That’s the question he’s yet to answer and he must answer.’’

In April, the RCMP concluded there wasn’t enough evidence to charge Wright. The prime minister had pre-viously insisted Duffy repay his expenses, but the senator said he didn’t have the money.

Wright then stepped in and wrote a personal cheque for $90,000 to Duffy to help him cover his expenses.

JIM BRONSKILLCanadian Press

OTTAWA — The federal government is looking at cre-ating a special web page that underscores the risks of travel-ling to parts of the world with a high incidence of terrorist ac-tivity.

The information portal would be aimed at raising awareness among everyone from prospective tourists to those who might be tempted to join a foreign conflict.

Artur Wilczynski, the For-eign Affairs Department’s di-

rector general of international security and intelligence, out-lined the proposal to a group of community advisers from vari-ous ethnic groups, documents released under the Access to Information Act show.

The idea emerges amid bloody fighting in Gaza and an outpouring of grief over a mis-sile attack in Ukraine that downed a passenger jet and killed all 298 people aboard, including a Canadian.

The presentation to the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security warned that Canadi-

ans heading abroad could be hurt or killed in a terrorist at-tack, kidnapped, or drawn into extremist activities.

They travel to areas where terrorism may be happening to conduct business, visit family, help global causes and, in rare instances, to participate in ter-rorist activities, says the pre-sentation delivered to a closed-door meeting in Gatineau, Que., in November.

Canadians may wish to take part in relief efforts, sup-port a political cause or report on a conflict, the presentation

notes say. “The impulse to help is

understandable, but Canadi-ans who decide to travel to a conflict zone should be aware of the risks they are taking.’’

The proposed new web-site would complement ex-isting federal travel adviso-ries found at travel.gc.ca, it adds.

“Information is largely orga-nized by country, but we are considering developing a spe-cific page on risks related to terrorism.’’

sibility of another strike that would cripple the Lower Mainland’s ports.

Representatives of more than 1,000 non-unionized drivers and about 400 union-ized truckers are due to meet with Federal Transportation Minister Lisa Raitt and British Columbia Transporta-tion Minister Todd Stone.

Gavin McGarrigle of Unifor has accused gov-ernment of failing to de-liver on a promise to es-tablish and enforce a minimum rate of pay for all drivers.

He says he hopes government will hear truckers’ demands today and take action.

The federal govern-ment has said it has been working with B.C. to ensure truckers are paid the rates agreed on.

Vancouver’s port au-thority has said it creat-

ed a complaint phone line allowing truckers to report companies pay-ing them too little.

But McGarrigle says the complaints are toothless, because com-panies will not pay workers minimum rates unless the government forces them through legislation.

More than 1,000 non-unionized truckers went on strike in Febru-ary and 250 of their

union counterparts joined them in March, crippling operations at Vancouver-area ports for weeks.

But a deal was reached at the end of March, and drivers went back to work.

The dispute focused on pay, unpaid time spent at the port waiting for cargo, and allega-tions that some compa-nies underpaid drivers.

CANADIAN PRESS/SEAN KILPATRICK

Suspended Senator Mike Duffy in May 2013.

Duffy accused of charging for travel to funeral, ceremonies in Ottawa

Protect our earth.The Cranbrook Daily Townsman and the

Kimberley Daily Bulletin promote recycling.

We use vegetable-based inks, and our newsprint, tin and aluminum waste is recycled.

Special federal site would warn of terror risks abroad

NOT IN THE BROCHURE

CANADIAN PRESS/DARRYL DYCK

Striking container truck drivers stand by in Vancouver, on March 21, 2014.

B.C.’s unionized truckers hopeful dispute with government can be resolved

C ANADIAN PRESSVANCOUVER —

Vancouver-area truck-ers hope a meeting set

for today with govern-ment officials will re-solve an ongoing dis-pute and avert the pos-