Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.). (Corvallis, Or.) 1903 ... · Pu Chun, who has--been proclaimed...

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. .... ... .... t .. ., .. ........ . ' - - - . . . , WEEKLY. GAZETTE, UNION. Estab. Kstab. Jnly. Dec, 1897 1862 . Consolidated Feb., 1899. CORVAIiLIS, BENTOH COUNTY, OREGON, FRIDAY", JANUARY 30, 1903. VOL. XXXX. NO. 6. TROUBLE AHEAD IN CHINA. FIFTY PEOPLE BURNED. A WATERY WASTE. EVENTS OP THE DAY THE LEGISLATURE HORRIBLE WRECK ALLIES ACCEPT IT Revolt Now in Progress May Prove More Serious Than That of 1900. Victoria, B. C, Jan. 28. The steam- ers Athenian and Tremont arrived this morning from the Orient, having both sailed from Yokohama and arrived within an hour of each other. The steamers bring further news of the revolt - in Kansu, and one corres- pondent telegraphs to the Shanghai papers from Las Ho Kow to the effect that unless Tung Fuh Siang is sup- pressed the powers will soon find them selves face to face with a bigger revolt than two years ago. . Missionaries are already beginning to leave the threat ened district. A correspondent of the Shanghai Mercury in Kansu writes: "A crisis is imminent and the offi cials are powerle :s to act. The Taotai is suppressing news. There is cause for grave apprehension unless Tung Fuh Siang is suppressed." Messrs. Rydbog and Soder stray, mis- - sionaries, who nave readied Shanghai from Singan, having come from the in terior because of the threatened revolt, in an interview given to a German daily of Shanghai state that Tung Fuh Siang is gaining ground, and intends to lead his armies to Singan.' where he will en deavor to make his capital and place Pu Chun, who has -- been proclaimed emperor, on the throne, lung is him- self enlisting troops,? and everything else points to the (act that he has gov ernment support. Kansu and Shensi are overrun by Tung's spies. All pro- - foreign officials are being removed from Singan. . - s- - Pekin correspondents also tell of the threatened outbreak in the northwest, and credit Yong Lu, the "real ruler of China," as being behind the movement. A Canton correspondent of a Hong Kong paper states that the rebellion in Kwangsi is more serious than ever known before. The rebels, 40.000 to 50,000 in number, have taken possession of many districts and'' towns, and Pak Ngai, Pak Shek, Sishing, Siyan, Hing Yip and Lau Cbow are in their hands. They are now marching into Yunnan, armed with modetn rifles." The names of their chiefs are Chan and Luk. The officials at Canton are enlisting soldiers. MANY SETTLERS AFFECTED. Recent Decision in Nelson Case of Great Importance to Homesteaders. Washington, Jan. 28. The decision of the supreme court today in the case of Nelson against the Northern Pacific rai l.way com pay, to SJae efiect that the I United States holds title to all lands a long" proposed lines of land grant rail- roads up to the time of the filing of the map of definite location, and further holding that no rights to any lands within the limits of a grant passed to the road on the filin'g of the general map, affects a great number of home steaders who had gone on land prior to the filing of the map of definite loca tion, and who later found themselves within the limits of the railroad grants. These settlers will be allowed to retain possession of such lands, and the com- pany must look elsewhere for indem nity. James Hamilton Lewis was at- torney for Nelson. To Develope Montana Coal Fields. Butte, Mont., Jan. 28. The an nouncement is made that the Northern Pacific company has in contemplation the development of 1,600 acres of prom ising coal lands lying east of Red Lodge, where the extensive fields of the Rocky Fork coal company are be'ng developed. These coal developments are among the largest in the Northwest. Henry Horn, the retiring assistant superin- tendent of the Northern" Pacific, who will assume charge of the Northern Pacific coal property February 1 , inti- mated at Red Lodge that such would be the case. He would not disucss the matter for publication, however. Lava Dust Falls with Rain. San Francisco, Jan. 28. Small patches of an extremely fine white sand or dust were seen on many asphalt paved streets today when the rain of last night had dried. Scientists say this dust must have fallen with the rain, as anything like it was never seen here before. It is believed to have come from the volcano of Santa Maria, in Guatemala, which broke out in vio lent eruption in October, and caused the ruin of a great area of cultivated territory. The theory is that the dust, being lighter than air, was carried ,000 miles from the point of its ascen sion. - For Lewis and Clark Fair. Salt Lake, Jan. 28. Jn the senate today a bill was introduced by Senator Lewis providing'for a Utah exhibit at the Lewis and .Clark exposition at Portland, Or., in 1905. The bill pro- vides for the appointment of a commis- sion of three members and the appro- priation of $10,000 A bill was intro- duced by Representative Wilson, of Wasatch county, providing fcrr the ap pointment of a commissioner of rail ways, whose duty it shall be to e&tab- - lisblish maximum rates, prevent dis crimination and dee that existing laws are enforced. Silver is Down Again. Manila, Jan. 28. The decline in the value of silver has forced the Philippine government to lower the official rate. The new ratio is $2.61 silver for $1 gold, the lowest official rate ever de- clared. It represents a heavy loss to the insular treasury, and the commer- cial houses fear that further- declines will result in commercial disturbances; The reports that the houses of congress disagree on the currency question have had a disquieting effect here. - Southern Oregon Streams on a Rampage, Owing to Heavy Rains. Grants Pass, Or., Jan. 26.- -- The re- - cent warm and heavy rains have caused the greatest floods that Southern Ore- gon has known for many years. The Rogue river reached the highest point in tms city Saturday night that it has reached since 1890, when the bridge spanning it here was washed away. No trains have been able to reach here from the north or sonth since Saturday morning, and none are expected befoie some time today. Much damage has been done the Southern Pacific , all through this section of the state. Improvement at Ashland. Ashland, Or., Jan. 26. The storm and flood- - situation has greatly im proved in Southern Oregon the past 24 hours. The temperature fell late last night and the rains abated in the valleys, while in the mountains what precipitation there was came in the form of snow. Streams immediately Degan to fall, and they have been grad ually receding from their flood staee during the day, so that ' little further damage is expected to result from high water in this section. In this countv much damage has been suffered by county roads and bridges. Still Rising at Salem. ; Salem, Or., Jan. 26. The Willam ete river lat night registered 25 feet above the low water mark and was still rising. This is the highest stage tne river ftas attained this year, and there is occasion for alarm. If the present moderate weather continues for a few days a further rise of prob ably four feet is expected in the Btage ot tne river. it will be at least 24 hours longer before the effect of the recent rains on the river's stage will be exhausted, and until then the stream will not recede. RAN INTO A WASHOUT. Engineer and Fireman Lose Their Lives In an O. R. & IS. Wreck. Pendleton, Or., Jan. 26. Passenger train No. 6. on the O. R. & N.. which left Portland at 8:15 Saturday night and passed through Pendleton at 4 :45 Sunday morning, ran into a washout on a nil IVo in lies -- east of Bmzham Springs. The engine was thrown into Meacham creek in six or eight feet of water and on top of it were piled the baggage and mail cars and the chair car. The engineer, Thomas Patty, and fireman, William Milligan, were killed almost instantly. William Maxwell, of Portland, a passenger, was seriously niured. but aside from this the injur ies were slight. The wreck was caused by a washout about two miles east of the new steel uridge which has been built on Meach am creek. The heavy snows on the mountains have been, melted by a Chi nook, and the waters were raging. No. 23 freight train passed over this par- ticular piece of road a few hours before No. 6 and reported every thing O. K. RICH STRIKE IN MONTANA. Free Gold Bearing Ledge 3,000 Feet Long Which Yields $5 a Pan. Butte, Mont., Jan. 27. A special to the Miner from Weiser, Idaho, says advicep just received there tell of a most wonderful strike of gold made on the Big creek about two and a half miles east of Profile gap. The nearest settlement is a place called Golden on the Big creek. A letter from reliable parties at Thunder mountain says that Edward Stamley and Edward H. Martin and several others have located 16 claims on a massive porphyrized quartz dyke which measures 3,000 feet in length and is impregnated with par tides 6T gold. A ledge 250 feet in width accompanies the porphyry dyke and it is also highly auriferous. Rough pan assays made of the ledge show the poorest specimens to assay $5 in free gold. Other specimens show yellow metal to the naked eye. . Old pros- pectors declare the discovery surpasses anything within their knowledge and that $1,000,000 worth of ore is in plain sight. Better Than Marconi. Berlin, Jan. 27. Professor Ferdi- nand Braua, of Strassburg university, whose application of Leyden jars in propagating electric waves is said to have enabled Marconi to teleraph with- out wires across the Atlantic, has an- nounced that he has discovered & meth- od of producin electric energy of unlim- ited volume, and projecting it into space in the form of electric waves, to any desired distance. The new method secures greater accuracy of transmis- sion through a more perfect attunement of the transmitters and receivers. , Wrecked by Robbers. Trinidad, Colo., Jan. 27. A Color- ado & Southern passenger train was wrecked last night four miles south of Waterville, N. M., under circumstances indicating an attempt at train robbery. The train was running at a high rate of hspeed when the wreck occurred. The engine, express car and smoker turned over. Four passengers were injured, two ol whom may die. All of the pas sengers were shaken op. Coal Prices Tumbling. New York, Jan. 27. There has been a further break in the price of inde- pendent coal, in some cases as low as $7 a ton ;f. . o. b. being asked, while no dealer was willing to buy at a higher price than $8 a ton. In order, to get the embargo, ordered a few days ago, taken off, some of the independent operators whose coal is carried by the Lehigh Valley railroad, were selling their coal at anything above $4 a ton at the collieries for delivery at points between New York and ' the collieries. Inmates of Big London Asylum Perish In Smoke and Flames. London, Jan. 29. Half a hundred insane patients were burned to death by a fire at the Colney Hatch hospital this morning. The outbreak occurred in the Jewish wing of the institution The flames spread with great rapidity and before they could be got under con trol five wooden buildings were gutted. All the enorts ol the officials were directed to removing the insane pa tients, but the latter became wild with excitement and so panic stricken that not only were they unable to help themselves, but greatly impeded the operations fo those trying to save them. There were nearly 600 women in the burning annex at the time the fire was discovered and most of them were safe- ly "transferred to the main building, which was uninjured. Some, however, escaped and are fltill at large, render- ing it difficult to ascertain the exac. number of those 'burned to death. The officials admit that about 50 bodies hare been recovered, but it is feared that the full extent of the disas ter is not yet known. All the victims were lunatics. Their charred remains presented a horrifying spectacle. The asylum was beseiged by anxious rela. fives and friends of the patients who arrived form all quarters. Pitiable scenes were witnessed as weeping men and women left the premises, after ascertaining that relatives and friends had perished in the flamep. The nurses had a terrible experience in trying to assist the insane people who were so panic stricken that they had literally to be driven to a place of safety. . The circumstances accompanying the destruction of the insane asylum at Conley Hatch have excited much indig- nation against the authorities. It is alleged taht, in addition to the lack of sufficient water supply a&d of adequate fire department, the complex system of locks, requiring master keys, which could not be found when wanted, was responsible for the terrible scenes en- acted. VICTORY FOR SHEEPMEN. Federal Judge Denies Hitchcock's Power to Make Rules. Salt Lake City, Jan. 29. Judge Marshall, of the United States District court, today sustained the demurrer of the .defendant in the case of the United States against Frank Martinus, who was charged with running a band of 2,-0- 00 sheep on the Fish Lake foreBt re- serve, in violation of the rules formu- lated for the protection of forest re- serves by the secretary of the interior. Judge Marshall states that congress has exceeded its legislative power in em powering the secretary of the interior to make rules the violation of which would be a criminal act, and held that the law was unconstitutional. The de cision is regarded as one of the greatest importance to Utah sheepmen. A number of pending similar cases will be thrown out of court. The effect of Judge Marshall's de cision will be to throw open to sheep and cattle interests more than 1,000,-00- 0 acres of the choicest grazing land in the state, which for the past few years has been carefully guarded by the government. As soon as the situation becomes known, it is believed hundreds of thousands of sheep will be brought across the line from adjoining states, and the forest reserves will be covered with sheep. COAL COMBINE ENJOINED. Detroit Dealers Try to Dodge Law by Repealing Illegal Rule. Detroit, Jan. 29. The Wayne cir cuit court today issued the preliminary injunction asked for by Prosecutor Hunt against the Detriot coal exchange, an organization of 30, local coal dealers. The injunction restrains the exchange from acting as an organization to fix the minimum price at which coal shall be sold. The fact was brought out today that 14 of the largest coal dealers of the city have resigned from the exchange, leav- - mg tne smaller dealers to settle witn the law. January 9, at a meeting of the exchange, one of the larger dealers offered a resolution rescinding the clause in the by-law- s providing for the fixing of a minimum price for coal. It is on this by-la- w that Prosecutor Hunt's case is principally based. There was opposition to rescinding the by-la- and when the resolution was voted down the 14 large dealers promptly re- signed from the exchange. Crisis Coming in Acre. .Washington, Jan. 29. Tie" Brazilian minister and Bolivian charge here, called separately on Secretary Hay to- day to acquaint him with the position of their respective governments r in the dispute over the territory of Acre. It appears that the situation is really critical, but both diplomats assured Secretary Hay that under no condition i would American interests in Acre suffer beyond the happenings absolutely inci- dent to warfare. Cuban Treaty Extended. Washington, Jan. 29. The president today sent to the senate an agreement with Cuba extending the time for the ratification of the Cuban reciprocity treaty. Under the terms of the Cuban treaty ratification was required by Jan- uary 31, and it has become apparent that the time limit was too short. The president also transmitted the Canadian boundary treaty to the senate. GATHERED FROM ALL PARTS OF THE TWO HEMISPHERES.' Comprehensive Review of the Import- ant Happenings of the Past Week, Presented In Condensed Form, Most- - Likely to Prove Interesting to Our Many Readers. Wilhelm Jordan, the poet, died sud- - denly at Baden-Bade- n. A bulletin from. Boston states that of the Navy Lone shews a slight indication of pneumonia Th rnnfprfinp.e of printing trades anions at Indianapolis reached an agreement to federate under a central tody. The widow of Theodore H. Fajardo has been awarded $40,000 for the death-o- f her husband in the New York Central tunnel accident. The Mexican tobacco and cigarette corporation, of Trenton, N. J., incor- porated two weeks ago, with an author-ze- d ciapital of $100,000, has filed pa- pers increasing its capital stock to $12.-000,00- 0. Four men robbed the Citizens' bank of Waterloo. la., and escaped with $3,500 in cash, exchanging a fusillade with a dozen citizens as they drove away in a Etolen buggy. Major Lewis B. Lawton, of the judge advocate, general's department, has been retired on account of disabilities received during the Chinese campaign. He was promoted prior to "retirement! in recognition of his gallantry. A witness in the murder trial of Wil liam Hooper Young, in New York, says he has received an anonymous letter threatening him with death if he testi fies. It contains excerpts from the blood atonement doctrine of the Mor- mon church. An American steamer has been ecked on the Welsh coast. The plague at Mazatlan, Mexico, con- tinues to claim four to eight victims daily. Oregon'sdelay in recommending ir rigation schemes may lose her Bhare of the funds A mob at New Orleans burned a Nergo at the stake who had shot and killed a sheriff. . A new freight rate has been, estab- lished between the Pacific coast and Shanghai, China. President Roosevelt 7 has appointed Judge William R. Day, of Canton, O., to a seat on the supreme bench of the United States. The governor of IMinnesota has ex pressed himself in favor of the Lewis and Clark fair and says he will do all in his power for it. The new high school building at Bloomington, 111., has been destroyed by fire. Loss, $530,000. It was one of the finest school buildings in the state. - A question has been raised in con- gress as to the power of the Colombian minister. Thomas Herran. to sign the canal treaty for his country. The Colombian constitution says congress must act. The flood at the headwaters of the Willamette are subsiding, but aiong the lower river they are still raising. Much damage has already resulted and more may follow. The coal strike commission has near- ly completed its work. The trialgof Major Glenn is nearly over and it is likely the court will acquit him. Marconi will charge one cent a word for the transmiesicn of wirelessmes-Bage- s across the ocean. Teller has been elected to congress by Colorado Democrats, but the Repub- licans will not oppose it. The house has passed the agricul- tural bill. It carries an appropriation of $300,000 for free seeds. The coal miners' convention, in ses- sion at Indianapolis, voted down a proposition to endorse socialism. Bowen is confident that he will soon be able to reach .satisfactory terms with Great Britain and Germany. Senator Mitchell was ill for several days the latter part of lastweek and unable to attend to his routine . dutie3. Great Britain has entered a protest against the Cuban reciprocity treaty, claiming it will hurt the sugar indus- - tiy. Ting Fuh Siang has been proclaimed emperor of China in opposition to the present ruler and will begin a war to kill off all foreigners. After three years' delay, the treaty providing for the fixing of the Alaskan boundary, has been signed by the United States and Great Britain. Severe earthquakes shook South Carolina and Georgia. Governor Chamberlain has signed the Portland charter bill. Germans say Venezuelans began the recent fight at Fort San Carlos. - A driving? snow storm in Central Kansas has demoralized business. An explosion of dynamite in a tunnel at Pittsburg resulted in four deaths. A wealthy Jersey City produce merch ant was doped and robbed of - $ll,Q,pO or Charles R. Ingersoll, of f!nnmwti(nt. is criticallv ill. He is WHAT THE LAWMAKERS OF OREGON ARE DOhNG AT SALEM. Bills of Importance That are Being Intro-- . duced and Acted Upon in Both Houses Measures Signed by the Governor- - Progress of the Balloting for United States Senator. Tuesday. The vote today showed no change excepting the appearance of George L jsaKer in tne neid. ine result was as follows: Fulton 32, Geer 17, Wood 17 Baker 5, scattering 16, asent 3, total 90 The House Hale's bill providing a fine and imprisonment for persons de iaumng a note Din witn intent was defeated. Representative Both's bill to relocate the county seat of Columbia county was passed this morning. Representative Murphy introduced bill creating the Eastern Oregon agri cultural college, appropriating $40,000 for buildings and $10,000 per annum for its maintenance. The Senate" Kuykendall has intro duced a bill providing the following flat salaries; Governor $1,500, Becre tary of state $1,500, state treasurer $800, superintendent of public inetruc tion $3,000. attorney general . $3,000. T" II m uy request .ro wnen introduced a bill to create a state board of examiners for the purpose of examining and li censingthe practice of osteopathy. Marsters' bill, to provide for execu- tions at the state penitentiary, was passed by unanimous vote. Price's hili appropriating $20,000 for an Eastern Oregon agricultural col- lege was pases J. Representative Gill's bill for a spe- cial library tax of 5 mill in Multno- mah county passed both houses today. Governor Chamberlain appointed Al- bert Tozier, of Portland, to be expert te measure and examine printing in the office of the state printer. Monday. The vote today stood as follows: Fulton 21, Geer 13, Wood 14, scatter- ing 18, absent and paired 21, total 90. In the House A concurrent resolu- tion was introduced today appointing a committee to endeavor to have the Washington legislature raise its Lewis and Clark appropriation to $100,000. Murphy, of .Union, introduced a bill to establish an industrial college at Union. Other notable bills appearing in the house were: By Shelley, of Lane, to"ex tend the Australian ballot to all city elections; By Johnson, of Grant, for" a portage railroad above The Dalles; by Robbins, of Baker, for a mining bureau. A bill providing for creation of the office of state inspector of hops, and to fix the rate of tare on hops, -- has been introduced by Mulkey in the senate, and La Follett in the House. A joint memorial was adopted asking congress to call a convention for the purpose of framing an amendment to the federal constitution providing for election of senators by direct vote of the people. . Carnahan, of Clatsop, is in favor of doing away with the poll tax law now on the code of Oregon. The poll tax, a 9 now provided, is $1, which is as- sessed on every citizen in the -- state be- tween the ages of 21 and 50. Carna-han'- s bill is to Repeal this section in itb entirety. In the Senate The senate spent most of its time on what might be called "legislative grind", or the second reading of bills. House bills authorizing The Dalles to issue water bonds, and authorizing Linn county to maintain a ferry at Harrisburg were passed. Governor Chamberlain today signed the Portland fireboat bill and the bill for the creition of an irreducible school fund for Douglas county. The committee on agriculture adopted a report that the "one-mile-lim- it" sheep grazing bill be not passed, This action kills the measure. PORTLAND MARKET.! Wheat Walla Walla, 75c; blue stem, 86c; valley, 78c. Barley Feed, $23.50 per ton; brew- ing, $24. Flour Best grade, $4.304.85 ; grah- - am, fj.zoccgd.oo Millstuffs Bran, $1819 per ton; middlings, $23 24; shorts, $1920. chop, $18. 4 Oats No. 1 vwhite, $1.151.17K; gray, $1.12b1.15 per cental. Hay Timothy, $1112; clover, $89; cheat, $910 per ton. Potatoes Best Burbanks, 6075c per sack; ordinary, 4050c per cental, growers' prices; Merced sweets, $2 2.25 per cental. Poultry Chickens, mixed, 11 c; young, ll12c;hens, ll12c; turkeys, live, 1516c; dressed, 1820c; ducks, '$77.50per dozen; geese, $78. 50. Cheese Full cream, twins, 16 17Kc; Young America, 1718c; factory prices, llMc less. Butter Fancy creamery, 3032c per pound; extras, 30c; dairy, 20 22c; store, 15 18c. - . Eggs 22K25 per dozen. Hops Choice, 2526c per pound. Wool Valley, 1215c; Eastern Oregon, 8t4c; mohair, 2628c. .Beef Gross, cows, 3dc per pound; steers, 44c; dressed, le. Veal 7K8Mc. Mutton Gross, 4c per pound ; dressed, 7c. Lambs Gross, 4c per pound; dressed, 7Mc. ' Hoga Gross, 6Jc per pound; EXPRESS TRAIN ON EASTERN ROAD COLLIDES WITH LOCAL. At Least Thirty Met Death Many Bodies Have Not Been Recovered The Ruins Catch Fire and Burn Express Was Running 65 Miles an Hour Twenty Five Injured. XT T T nn jew iori, Jan. . rne most ap- palling wreck that has occurred in the vicinity of this city in many years, the loss of life being estimated at not less than dU persons, took place tonight at Graceland, near Westfield, N. J., the Central rai.roa l of New Jersey, when the Royal Blue Line express westbound, plunged at tip speed into the rear of a local train. Seven bodies only have been identi fied, while 16 more, almost unrecogniz able corpses, have been recovered. In addition, it is almost certain that many bodies remain in the wreck. Immediately after the crash three of the shattered cars of the local train took fire, rendering impossible the res cue oi many oi tne wounded, wno were pinned fast in the wreck. Man7 bodies are believed to have been consumed On board the flyer all the passengers, though badly shaken up, escaped unin jured, except for trifling bruises. The train which was run into left New York at 5:45, and runs express to Boundbrook. Bevond Bound brook it runs as a local. The Royal Blue train left 15 minutes later, but travels at higher rate of speed and makes no stops except at Elizabeth, and is sched- uled to overtake the slower train just beyond Graceland, where the latter switehts from track No. 3 into 'track No. 4 to permit the Royal Blue to pass. This evening a freight train was blocked on track No. 4, and the local received orders to proceed on the ex- press track to Dunnellen and there take the outside or No. 4 track. Short- ly after receiving orders the train had to stop for a hot box, which caused Buch delays that when it got under way again it was due at Dunnellen. The train had just started and was moving slowly, when the Royal Blue, traveling at full speed, which at" that point usually 6 -- miles an hour, crashed into the rear end. The heavy engine of the Royal Blue tore its way into the rear end, and at the same time drove the forward end of that car into the rear end of the car ahead, which in turn was driven into the third car, and this in turn was driven into the fourth car from the rear. The fourth car was only partially wrecked, but the last three were torn to pieces. The engine of the Royal Blue left the rails and turned over on its side, tne engineer and fireman stick ing to thqir posts and going down in the wreck. They are now ia the hos- pital at Plainfield. The engineer is not believed to have any chance of liv ing. - Just as the wreck occurred, an east-boun- d train was approaching on track No. 2. Before it could be stopped, the engine crasned into tne wrecnage which had been hurled on the track, but it was light stuff and the engine brushed it aside and crushed part of it under the wheels. The train ran its own length beyond the wreck, stopped, and, after ascertaining it had sustained no-- ' injury itself, proceeded to New York. STRIKE RULE IS CHANGED. Coal Miners Make Strikes More Difficult Wage Conference Called. Indianapolis, Jan. 29. The United Mineworkers convention today finished changing and bringing up to date the constitution and by-law- s. The im- - oprtant changes are: The changing of the power to.vote a strike from two-thir- the membership of the national executive board to a full two-thir- ds membership of the organiz- ation; fixirg a uniform initiation fee ol $10 for miners and $2.50 for bdys be- tween 14 and 16 years of ge; providing free admission to the organization for boys that are orphans of union miners, and placing a fine of $10 on officers of local unions that issue transfer cards to miners that are three months deiln-quen- t. The convention adjourned this after- noon. A conference with the operators will be held tomorrow. , Defeated by Ladrones. Manila, Jan. 29. It is reported here that the volunteer force organized at Boliano, Province of Zambales, for the purpose of disposing of the Ladrones in that vicinity, has been defeated and that three Americans, including Mr. Osborne, a teacher, were killed. The Ladrones outnumbered the volunteers, surrounded the latter and boloed them. The Americans died fighting. The de- tails of the affair obtainable are at .present meager. - Mob Holds Up Coal Train. Chicago, Jan. 29. A mob of nearly 500 men, women and boys held up a Chicago & Northwestern coal train at Webster avenue, on the Wisconsin di vision, and carried away the contents of five cars before dispersed by the po- lice. Women led the attack, uncoup ling, the cars and intimidating the train crew. For three hours traffic was suspended, while the mob increased to more than 1,000 persona. MINISTER BOWEN WILL REACH AGREE- MENT WITH THE POWERS. Blockade Is to Be Raised Immediately Great Britain Is Willing to Accept 30 Per Cent of Customs Receipts as a Guarantee for Indemnity, but Germany Wants 50 Per Cent. Caracas, Jan. 28. The Associated Press correspondent has just received a communication from the British naval officers at La Guayra informing him that the blockade will be raised today. Not Confirmed by Bowen. Washington, Jan. 28. There is no information in Washington to justify the positive statement contained in the Caracas dispatch that the Venezuelan blockade will be raised today. Min- ister Bowen continues hopeful that such happy consummation will result from the pending negotiations, as the latest proposition to the allied governments is regarded by him as an eminently favor able one. He is still waiting formal replies to that proposition from Great Britaia and Germany, and on these will depend the question whether the block- ade is to be raised. As indicated in a Rome dispatch re ceived last night, the question now to be determined is the amount of cus toms receipts which are to be given as guarantee. Great Britain is believed to be favorable to accepting the 30 per cent offered by Mr. Bowen, while Ger many is euppoesd to be insisting on 50 per cent. Minister Bowen declines to discuss the question in any of its phasep, nor will he disclose what is the actual amount of guaranty he has been offered. With the promptness which has characterized all its actions in the pres ent emergency, the Italian government has cabled to its fleet commander in Venezuelan waters to withdraw from the blockade as soon as the ships of the powers do po. Information to this effect was received by the Italian am bassador today. FOR CENTRAL WASHINGTON. Possibilities of Getting Larger Supply of Water for Irrigation. Washington, Jan. 28. An examina tion has recently been made by F. C. Calkins, of the geological survey, of the possibilities of increasing the water supply of portions of Central Washington. Kittitas valley is one of the areas in which irrigation is already extensively practiced, water being drawn from the Yakima river and its tributaries. Plans have matured for " the construction of ditches from the Upper Yakima, which will materially extend the Irrigated area to the east and southeast in the near future. Attention as also given to a strip of desert land just east of the Columbia river, now used as a stock ranch, and also- - to a portion of the great wheat growing region adjoining it on the north and east, which extends north- ward into the Big Bend of the Colum- bia and eastward beyond the Idaho ' boundary. As the district has an arid climate, and its eastern portion is prac tically without surface streams, the ob ject of the examination was to determ ine the practicability of sinking deep wells as a means of obtaining water, and "especially to determine whether artesian flows could be found. Irriga- tion from the Columbia, except to a limited extent, on its lowest terraces,' appears to be impracticable because of the depth and steepness of the sides of the canyon through which the river flows. " 4 East of the Columbia river the in- vestigations include Crab creek, the only perennial stream traversing the region, but its waters were found to be no more than sufficient for the irri- - : gation of its own bottom. In the wheat lands, where all crops are raised by dry farming, and where water for stock and domestic uses was formerly brought from springs, some- times at great distances, the possibility of increasing the present number of deep wells was carefully considered. The information gathered indicates, that a supply of water sufficient for present needs can be obtained by - deep drilling throughout the region examined at depths of from 400 to 675 feet. While there are no flowing artesian wells, the deep waters are found to be under pressure, and it is believed that in certain of the lower wells along the Northern Pacific road an artesian flow could be obtained by proper casing. It does not eeem that any considerable portion of the wheat lands can be irri- gated from deep wells, or that water from this source for irrigatioa can be found in sufficient quantities in the un- cultivated land east of the Columbia, though it is believed that in this sec- tion deep wells for stock-waterin- g pur- poses may be profitably sunk at some points. . -- - '' Coal Tipple Burned. r Terre Haute, Ind., Jan. 28. The tipple at the Harris-Lankyfo- rd mine, three miles west of here, burned today.. James Wesner was killed and four oth ers were bo badly suffocated that their' recovery is doubtful.1 The mine baa only one entrance, and the work of rescue was dangerous, owing to the de- - struction of tha hoisting machinery. Twenty men were hoisted to the surface by means of ropes. All were more or ess suffocated. dressed, 774c. 81 years old. -

Transcript of Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.). (Corvallis, Or.) 1903 ... · Pu Chun, who has--been proclaimed...

Page 1: Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.). (Corvallis, Or.) 1903 ... · Pu Chun, who has--been proclaimed ... Pacific coal property February 1, inti-mated at Red Lodge that such would ...

. .... ... .... t .. ., .. ........ .

'-- -.. . ,

WEEKLY.GAZETTE,UNION. Estab.

Kstab.Jnly.Dec,1897

1862 . Consolidated Feb., 1899. CORVAIiLIS, BENTOH COUNTY, OREGON, FRIDAY", JANUARY 30, 1903. VOL. XXXX. NO. 6.

TROUBLE AHEAD IN CHINA.FIFTY PEOPLE BURNED. A WATERY WASTE.EVENTS OP THE DAY THE LEGISLATURE HORRIBLE WRECK ALLIES ACCEPT ITRevolt Now in Progress May Prove More

Serious Than That of 1900.

Victoria, B. C, Jan. 28. The steam-ers Athenian and Tremont arrived thismorning from the Orient, having bothsailed from Yokohama and arrivedwithin an hour of each other.

The steamers bring further news ofthe revolt - in Kansu, and one corres-

pondent telegraphs to the Shanghaipapers from Las Ho Kow to the effectthat unless Tung Fuh Siang is sup-pressed the powers will soon find themselves face to face with a bigger revoltthan two years ago. . Missionaries arealready beginning to leave the threatened district. A correspondent of theShanghai Mercury in Kansu writes:

"A crisis is imminent and the officials are powerle :s to act. The Taotaiis suppressing news. There is causefor grave apprehension unless TungFuh Siang is suppressed."

Messrs. Rydbog and Soder stray, mis- -

sionaries, who nave readied Shanghaifrom Singan, having come from the interior because of the threatened revolt,in an interview given to a German dailyof Shanghai state that Tung Fuh Siangis gaining ground, and intends to leadhis armies to Singan.' where he will endeavor to make his capital and placePu Chun, who has -- been proclaimedemperor, on the throne, lung is him-self enlisting troops,? and everythingelse points to the (act that he has government support. Kansu and Shensiare overrun by Tung's spies. All pro- -

foreign officials are being removed fromSingan. . - s- -

Pekin correspondents also tell of thethreatened outbreak in the northwest,and credit Yong Lu, the "real ruler ofChina," as being behind the movement.

A Canton correspondent of a HongKong paper states that the rebellion inKwangsi is more serious than everknown before. The rebels, 40.000 to50,000 in number, have taken possessionof many districts and'' towns, and PakNgai, Pak Shek, Sishing, Siyan, HingYip and Lau Cbow are in their hands.They are now marching into Yunnan,armed with modetn rifles." The namesof their chiefs are Chan and Luk.The officials at Canton are enlistingsoldiers.

MANY SETTLERS AFFECTED.

Recent Decision in Nelson Case of GreatImportance to Homesteaders.

Washington, Jan. 28. The decisionof the supreme court today in the caseof Nelson against the Northern Pacificrai l.way com pay, to SJae efiect that the I

United States holds title to all landsa long" proposed lines of land grant rail-

roads up to the time of the filing of themap of definite location, and furtherholding that no rights to any landswithin the limits of a grant passed tothe road on the filin'g of the generalmap, affects a great number of homesteaders who had gone on land prior tothe filing of the map of definite location, and who later found themselveswithin the limits of the railroad grants.These settlers will be allowed to retainpossession of such lands, and the com-

pany must look elsewhere for indemnity. James Hamilton Lewis was at-

torney for Nelson.

To Develope Montana Coal Fields.Butte, Mont., Jan. 28. The an

nouncement is made that the NorthernPacific company has in contemplationthe development of 1,600 acres of promising coal lands lying east of Red Lodge,where the extensive fields of the RockyFork coal company are be'ng developed.These coal developments are amongthe largest in the Northwest. HenryHorn, the retiring assistant superin-tendent of the Northern" Pacific, whowill assume charge of the NorthernPacific coal property February 1 , inti-mated at Red Lodge that such wouldbe the case. He would not disucss thematter for publication, however.

Lava Dust Falls with Rain.San Francisco, Jan. 28. Small

patches of an extremely fine white sandor dust were seen on many asphaltpaved streets today when the rain oflast night had dried. Scientists saythis dust must have fallen with therain, as anything like it was never seenhere before. It is believed to havecome from the volcano of Santa Maria,in Guatemala, which broke out in violent eruption in October, and causedthe ruin of a great area of cultivatedterritory. The theory is that the dust,being lighter than air, was carried

,000 miles from the point of its ascension. -

For Lewis and Clark Fair.Salt Lake, Jan. 28. Jn the senate

today a bill was introduced by SenatorLewis providing'for a Utah exhibit atthe Lewis and .Clark exposition atPortland, Or., in 1905. The bill pro-vides for the appointment of a commis-sion of three members and the appro-priation of $10,000 A bill was intro-duced by Representative Wilson, ofWasatch county, providing fcrr the appointment of a commissioner of railways, whose duty it shall be to e&tab- -lisblish maximum rates, prevent discrimination and dee that existing lawsare enforced.

Silver is Down Again.Manila, Jan. 28. The decline in the

value of silver has forced the Philippinegovernment to lower the official rate.The new ratio is $2.61 silver for $1gold, the lowest official rate ever de-

clared. It represents a heavy loss tothe insular treasury, and the commer-cial houses fear that further- declineswill result in commercial disturbances;The reports that the houses of congressdisagree on the currency question havehad a disquieting effect here. -

Southern Oregon Streams on a Rampage,Owing to Heavy Rains.

Grants Pass, Or., Jan. 26.- -- The re--cent warm and heavy rains have causedthe greatest floods that Southern Ore-

gon has known for many years. TheRogue river reached the highest pointin tms city Saturday night that it hasreached since 1890, when the bridgespanning it here was washed away. Notrains have been able to reach herefrom the north or sonth since Saturdaymorning, and none are expected befoiesome time today. Much damage hasbeen done the Southern Pacific , allthrough this section of the state.

Improvement at Ashland.Ashland, Or., Jan. 26. The storm

and flood- - situation has greatly improved in Southern Oregon the past 24hours. The temperature fell late lastnight and the rains abated in thevalleys, while in the mountains whatprecipitation there was came in theform of snow. Streams immediatelyDegan to fall, and they have been gradually receding from their flood staeeduring the day, so that

'

little furtherdamage is expected to result from highwater in this section. In this countvmuch damage has been suffered bycounty roads and bridges.

Still Rising at Salem.; Salem, Or., Jan. 26. The Willamete river lat night registered 25 feetabove the low water mark and wasstill rising. This is the highest stagetne river ftas attained this year, andthere is occasion for alarm. If thepresent moderate weather continuesfor a few days a further rise of probably four feet is expected in the Btageot tne river. it will be at least 24hours longer before the effect of therecent rains on the river's stage willbe exhausted, and until then thestream will not recede.

RAN INTO A WASHOUT.

Engineer and Fireman Lose Their LivesIn an O. R. & IS. Wreck.

Pendleton, Or., Jan. 26. Passengertrain No. 6. on the O. R. & N.. whichleft Portland at 8:15 Saturday nightand passed through Pendleton at 4 :45Sunday morning, ran into a washouton a nil IVo in lies --east of BmzhamSprings. The engine was thrown intoMeacham creek in six or eight feet ofwater and on top of it were piled thebaggage and mail cars and the chaircar. The engineer, Thomas Patty, andfireman, William Milligan, were killedalmost instantly. William Maxwell,of Portland, a passenger, was seriouslyniured. but aside from this the injur

ies were slight.The wreck was caused by a washout

about two miles east of the new steeluridge which has been built on Meacham creek. The heavy snows on themountains have been, melted by a Chinook, and the waters were raging. No.23 freight train passed over this par-ticular piece of road a few hours beforeNo. 6 and reported every thing O. K.

RICH STRIKE IN MONTANA.

Free Gold Bearing Ledge 3,000 Feet LongWhich Yields $5 a Pan.

Butte, Mont., Jan. 27. A special tothe Miner from Weiser, Idaho, saysadvicep just received there tell of amost wonderful strike of gold made onthe Big creek about two and a halfmiles east of Profile gap. The nearestsettlement is a place called Golden onthe Big creek. A letter from reliableparties at Thunder mountain says thatEdward Stamley and Edward H. Martinand several others have located 16claims on a massive porphyrized quartzdyke which measures 3,000 feet inlength and is impregnated with partides 6T gold. A ledge 250 feet inwidth accompanies the porphyry dykeand it is also highly auriferous. Roughpan assays made of the ledge show thepoorest specimens to assay $5 in freegold. Other specimens show yellowmetal to the naked eye. . Old pros-pectors declare the discovery surpassesanything within their knowledge andthat $1,000,000 worth of ore is in plainsight.

Better Than Marconi.Berlin, Jan. 27. Professor Ferdi-

nand Braua, of Strassburg university,whose application of Leyden jars inpropagating electric waves is said tohave enabled Marconi to teleraph with-out wires across the Atlantic, has an-nounced that he has discovered & meth-od of producin electric energy of unlim-ited volume, and projecting it intospace in the form of electric waves, toany desired distance. The new methodsecures greater accuracy of transmis-sion through a more perfect attunementof the transmitters and receivers.

, Wrecked by Robbers.Trinidad, Colo., Jan. 27. A Color-

ado & Southern passenger train waswrecked last night four miles south ofWaterville, N. M., under circumstancesindicating an attempt at train robbery.The train was running at a high rate of

hspeed when the wreck occurred. Theengine, express car and smoker turnedover. Four passengers were injured,two ol whom may die. All of the passengers were shaken op.

Coal Prices Tumbling.New York, Jan. 27. There has been

a further break in the price of inde-

pendent coal, in some cases as low as $7a ton ;f. . o. b. being asked, while nodealer was willing to buy at a higherprice than $8 a ton. In order, to getthe embargo, ordered a few days ago,taken off, some of the independentoperators whose coal is carried by theLehigh Valley railroad, were sellingtheir coal at anything above $4 a tonat the collieries for delivery at pointsbetween New York and ' the collieries.

Inmates of Big London Asylum Perish InSmoke and Flames.

London, Jan. 29. Half a hundredinsane patients were burned to deathby a fire at the Colney Hatch hospitalthis morning. The outbreak occurredin the Jewish wing of the institutionThe flames spread with great rapidityand before they could be got under control five wooden buildings were gutted.

All the enorts ol the officials weredirected to removing the insane patients, but the latter became wild withexcitement and so panic stricken thatnot only were they unable to helpthemselves, but greatly impeded theoperations fo those trying to save them.

There were nearly 600 women in theburning annex at the time the fire wasdiscovered and most of them were safe-

ly "transferred to the main building,which was uninjured. Some, however,escaped and are fltill at large, render-

ing it difficult to ascertain the exac.number of those 'burned to death.

The officials admit that about 50bodies hare been recovered, but it isfeared that the full extent of the disaster is not yet known. All the victimswere lunatics. Their charred remainspresented a horrifying spectacle. Theasylum was beseiged by anxious rela.fives and friends of the patients whoarrived form all quarters. Pitiablescenes were witnessed as weeping menand women left the premises, afterascertaining that relatives and friendshad perished in the flamep.

The nurses had a terrible experiencein trying to assist the insane peoplewho were so panic stricken that theyhad literally to be driven to a place ofsafety. .

The circumstances accompanying thedestruction of the insane asylum atConley Hatch have excited much indig-nation against the authorities. It isalleged taht, in addition to the lack ofsufficient water supply a&d of adequatefire department, the complex systemof locks, requiring master keys, whichcould not be found when wanted, wasresponsible for the terrible scenes en-

acted.

VICTORY FOR SHEEPMEN.

Federal Judge Denies Hitchcock's Powerto Make Rules.

Salt Lake City, Jan. 29. JudgeMarshall, of the United States Districtcourt, today sustained the demurrer of

the .defendant in the case of the UnitedStates against Frank Martinus, whowas charged with running a band of 2,-0- 00

sheep on the Fish Lake foreBt re-

serve, in violation of the rules formu-

lated for the protection of forest re-

serves by the secretary of the interior.Judge Marshall states that congress hasexceeded its legislative power in empowering the secretary of the interiorto make rules the violation of whichwould be a criminal act, and held thatthe law was unconstitutional. The decision is regarded as one of the greatestimportance to Utah sheepmen. Anumber of pending similar cases will bethrown out of court.

The effect of Judge Marshall's decision will be to throw open to sheepand cattle interests more than 1,000,-00- 0

acres of the choicest grazing landin the state, which for the past few

years has been carefully guarded by thegovernment. As soon as the situationbecomes known, it is believed hundredsof thousands of sheep will be broughtacross the line from adjoining states,and the forest reserves will be coveredwith sheep.

COAL COMBINE ENJOINED.

Detroit Dealers Try to Dodge Law byRepealing Illegal Rule.

Detroit, Jan. 29. The Wayne circuit court today issued the preliminaryinjunction asked for by Prosecutor Huntagainst the Detriot coal exchange, anorganization of 30, local coal dealers.The injunction restrains the exchangefrom acting as an organization to fixthe minimum price at which coal shallbe sold.

The fact was brought out today that14 of the largest coal dealers of the cityhave resigned from the exchange, leav--

mg tne smaller dealers to settle witnthe law. January 9, at a meeting ofthe exchange, one of the larger dealersoffered a resolution rescinding theclause in the by-law- s providing for thefixing of a minimum price for coal. Itis on this by-la- w that Prosecutor Hunt'scase is principally based. There wasopposition to rescinding the by-la-

and when the resolution was voteddown the 14 large dealers promptly re-

signed from the exchange.

Crisis Coming in Acre..Washington, Jan. 29. Tie" Brazilian

minister and Bolivian charge here,called separately on Secretary Hay to-

day to acquaint him with the positionof their respective governments r

in thedispute over the territory of Acre. Itappears that the situation is reallycritical, but both diplomats assuredSecretary Hay that under no condition i

would American interests in Acre sufferbeyond the happenings absolutely inci-

dent to warfare.

Cuban Treaty Extended.Washington, Jan. 29. The president

today sent to the senate an agreementwith Cuba extending the time for theratification of the Cuban reciprocitytreaty. Under the terms of the Cubantreaty ratification was required by Jan-

uary 31, and it has become apparentthat the time limit was too short. Thepresident also transmitted the Canadianboundary treaty to the senate.

GATHERED FROM ALL PARTS OF THE

TWO HEMISPHERES.'

Comprehensive Review of the Import-ant Happenings of the Past Week,Presented In Condensed Form, Most- -

Likely to Prove Interesting to Our

Many Readers.

Wilhelm Jordan, the poet, died sud- -

denly at Baden-Bade- n.

A bulletin from. Boston states thatof the Navy Lone shews

a slight indication of pneumoniaTh rnnfprfinp.e of printing trades

anions at Indianapolis reached anagreement to federate under a centraltody.

The widow of Theodore H. Fajardohas been awarded $40,000 for thedeath-o- f her husband in the New YorkCentral tunnel accident.

The Mexican tobacco and cigarettecorporation, of Trenton, N. J., incor-

porated two weeks ago, with an author-ze- d

ciapital of $100,000, has filed pa-

pers increasing its capital stock to $12.-000,00- 0.

Four men robbed the Citizens' bankof Waterloo. la., and escaped with$3,500 in cash, exchanging a fusilladewith a dozen citizens as they drove

away in a Etolen buggy.

Major Lewis B. Lawton, of the judgeadvocate, general's department, hasbeen retired on account of disabilitiesreceived during the Chinese campaign.He was promoted prior to "retirement!in recognition of his gallantry.

A witness in the murder trial of William Hooper Young, in New York, sayshe has received an anonymous letterthreatening him with death if he testifies. It contains excerpts from theblood atonement doctrine of the Mor-

mon church.An American steamer has beenecked on the Welsh coast.

The plague at Mazatlan, Mexico, con-

tinues to claim four to eight victimsdaily.

Oregon'sdelay in recommending irrigation schemes may lose her Bhare of

the fundsA mob at New Orleans burned a

Nergo at the stake who had shot andkilled a sheriff. .

A new freight rate has been, estab-

lished between the Pacific coast and

Shanghai, China.President Roosevelt 7 has appointed

Judge William R. Day, of Canton, O.,to a seat on the supreme bench of theUnited States.

The governor of IMinnesota has expressed himself in favor of the Lewisand Clark fair and says he will do allin his power for it.

The new high school building atBloomington, 111., has been destroyedby fire. Loss, $530,000. It was oneof the finest school buildings in thestate.

- A question has been raised in con-

gress as to the power of the Colombianminister. Thomas Herran. to sign thecanal treaty for his country. TheColombian constitution says congressmust act.

The flood at the headwaters of theWillamette are subsiding, but aiongthe lower river they are still raising.Much damage has already resulted andmore may follow.

The coal strike commission has near-

ly completed its work.

The trialgof Major Glenn is nearlyover and it is likely the court will

acquit him.Marconi will charge one cent a word

for the transmiesicn of wirelessmes-Bage- s

across the ocean.

Teller has been elected to congressby Colorado Democrats, but the Repub-licans will not oppose it.

The house has passed the agricul-tural bill. It carries an appropriationof $300,000 for free seeds.

The coal miners' convention, in ses-

sion at Indianapolis, voted down aproposition to endorse socialism.

Bowen is confident that he will soonbe able to reach .satisfactory termswith Great Britain and Germany.

Senator Mitchell was ill for severaldays the latter part of lastweek andunable to attend to his routine . dutie3.

Great Britain has entered a protestagainst the Cuban reciprocity treaty,claiming it will hurt the sugar indus- -

tiy.Ting Fuh Siang has been proclaimed

emperor of China in opposition to thepresent ruler and will begin a war tokill off all foreigners.

After three years' delay, the treatyproviding for the fixing of the Alaskanboundary, has been signed by theUnited States and Great Britain.

Severe earthquakes shook SouthCarolina and Georgia.

Governor Chamberlain has signedthe Portland charter bill.

Germans say Venezuelans began therecent fight at Fort San Carlos.

- A driving? snow storm in CentralKansas has demoralized business.

An explosion of dynamite in a tunnelat Pittsburg resulted in four deaths.

A wealthy Jersey City produce merchant was doped and robbed of - $ll,Q,pO

or Charles R. Ingersoll, off!nnmwti(nt. is criticallv ill. He is

WHAT THE LAWMAKERS OF OREGON

ARE DOhNG AT SALEM.

Bills of Importance That are Being Intro--.duced and Acted Upon in Both Houses

Measures Signed by the Governor- -

Progress of the Balloting for UnitedStates Senator.

Tuesday.The vote today showed no change

excepting the appearance of George LjsaKer in tne neid. ine result was asfollows: Fulton 32, Geer 17, Wood 17Baker 5, scattering 16, asent 3, total 90

The House Hale's bill providing afine and imprisonment for persons deiaumng a note Din witn intent wasdefeated.

Representative Both's bill to relocatethe county seat of Columbia countywas passed this morning.

Representative Murphy introducedbill creating the Eastern Oregon agricultural college, appropriating $40,000for buildings and $10,000 per annumfor its maintenance.

The Senate" Kuykendall has introduced a bill providing the followingflat salaries; Governor $1,500, Becretary of state $1,500, state treasurer$800, superintendent of public inetruction $3,000. attorney general .

$3,000.T" II m

uy request .rownen introduced abill to create a state board of examinersfor the purpose of examining and licensingthe practice of osteopathy.

Marsters' bill, to provide for execu-tions at the state penitentiary, waspassed by unanimous vote.

Price's hili appropriating $20,000for an Eastern Oregon agricultural col-

lege was pases J.Representative Gill's bill for a spe-

cial library tax of 5 mill in Multno-mah county passed both houses today.

Governor Chamberlain appointed Al-bert Tozier, of Portland, to be expertte measure and examine printing inthe office of the state printer.

Monday.The vote today stood as follows:

Fulton 21, Geer 13, Wood 14, scatter-ing 18, absent and paired 21, total 90.

In the House A concurrent resolu-tion was introduced today appointinga committee to endeavor to have theWashington legislature raise its Lewisand Clark appropriation to $100,000.

Murphy, of .Union, introduced a billto establish an industrial college atUnion. Other notable bills appearingin the house were: By Shelley, of Lane,to"ex tend the Australian ballot to allcity elections; By Johnson, of Grant,for" a portage railroad above The Dalles;by Robbins, of Baker, for a miningbureau.

A bill providing for creation of theoffice of state inspector of hops, and tofix the rate of tare on hops, --has beenintroduced by Mulkey in the senate,and La Follett in the House.

A joint memorial was adopted askingcongress to call a convention for thepurpose of framing an amendment tothe federal constitution providing forelection of senators by direct vote ofthe people. .

Carnahan, of Clatsop, is in favor ofdoing away with the poll tax law nowon the code of Oregon. The poll tax,a 9 now provided, is $1, which is as-

sessed on every citizen in the --state be-

tween the ages of 21 and 50. Carna-han'- s

bill is to Repeal this section initb entirety.

In the Senate The senate spentmost of its time on what might becalled "legislative grind", or the secondreading of bills.

House bills authorizing The Dallesto issue water bonds, and authorizingLinn county to maintain a ferry atHarrisburg were passed.

Governor Chamberlain today signedthe Portland fireboat bill and the billfor the creition of an irreducible schoolfund for Douglas county.

The committee on agriculture adopteda report that the "one-mile-lim- it"

sheep grazing bill be not passed, Thisaction kills the measure.

PORTLAND MARKET.!

Wheat Walla Walla, 75c; bluestem, 86c; valley, 78c.

Barley Feed, $23.50 per ton; brew-

ing, $24.Flour Best grade, $4.304.85 ; grah- -

am, fj.zoccgd.ooMillstuffs Bran, $1819 per ton;

middlings, $23 24; shorts, $1920.chop, $18. 4

Oats No. 1 vwhite, $1.151.17K;gray, $1.12b1.15 per cental.

Hay Timothy, $1112; clover,$89; cheat, $910 per ton.

Potatoes Best Burbanks, 6075c persack; ordinary, 4050c per cental,growers' prices; Merced sweets, $22.25 per cental.

Poultry Chickens, mixed, 11 c;young, ll12c;hens, ll12c; turkeys,live, 1516c; dressed, 1820c; ducks,

'$77.50per dozen; geese, $78. 50.Cheese Full cream, twins, 16

17Kc; Young America, 1718c;factory prices, llMc less.

Butter Fancy creamery, 3032cper pound; extras, 30c; dairy, 20

22c; store, 15 18c. - .

Eggs 22K25 per dozen.

Hops Choice, 2526c per pound.Wool Valley, 1215c; Eastern

Oregon, 8t4c; mohair, 2628c..Beef Gross, cows, 3dc per

pound; steers, 44c; dressed, le.Veal 7K8Mc.Mutton Gross, 4c per pound ;

dressed, 7c.Lambs Gross, 4c per pound;

dressed, 7Mc.' Hoga Gross, 6Jc per pound;

EXPRESS TRAIN ON EASTERN ROAD

COLLIDES WITH LOCAL.

At Least Thirty Met Death Many BodiesHave Not Been Recovered The RuinsCatch Fire and Burn Express WasRunning 65 Miles an Hour TwentyFive Injured.

XT T T nnjew iori, Jan. . rne most ap-

palling wreck that has occurred in thevicinity of this city in many years, theloss of life being estimated at not lessthan dU persons, took place tonight atGraceland, near Westfield, N. J.,the Central rai.roa l of New Jersey,when the Royal Blue Line expresswestbound, plunged at tip speed intothe rear of a local train.

Seven bodies only have been identified, while 16 more, almost unrecognizable corpses, have been recovered. Inaddition, it is almost certain that manybodies remain in the wreck.

Immediately after the crash three ofthe shattered cars of the local traintook fire, rendering impossible the rescue oi many oi tne wounded, wno werepinned fast in the wreck. Man7 bodiesare believed to have been consumed

On board the flyer all the passengers,though badly shaken up, escaped uninjured, except for trifling bruises.

The train which was run into leftNew York at 5:45, and runs express toBoundbrook. Bevond Bound brook itruns as a local. The Royal Blue trainleft 15 minutes later, but travels athigher rate of speed and makes nostops except at Elizabeth, and is sched-uled to overtake the slower train justbeyond Graceland, where the latterswitehts from track No. 3 into 'trackNo. 4 to permit the Royal Blue to pass.

This evening a freight train wasblocked on track No. 4, and the localreceived orders to proceed on the ex-

press track to Dunnellen and theretake the outside or No. 4 track. Short-ly after receiving orders the train hadto stop for a hot box, which causedBuch delays that when it got under wayagain it was due at Dunnellen. Thetrain had just started and was movingslowly, when the Royal Blue, travelingat full speed, which at" that pointusually 6 --miles anhour, crashed into the rear end.

The heavy engine of the Royal Bluetore its way into the rear end, and atthe same time drove the forward end ofthat car into the rear end of the carahead, which in turn was driven intothe third car, and this in turn wasdriven into the fourth car from therear. The fourth car was only partiallywrecked, but the last three were tornto pieces. The engine of the RoyalBlue left the rails and turned over onits side, tne engineer and fireman sticking to thqir posts and going down inthe wreck. They are now ia the hos-

pital at Plainfield. The engineer isnot believed to have any chance of living. -

Just as the wreck occurred, an east-boun- d

train was approaching on trackNo. 2. Before it could be stopped, theengine crasned into tne wrecnagewhich had been hurled on the track,but it was light stuff and the enginebrushed it aside and crushed part of itunder the wheels. The train ran itsown length beyond the wreck, stopped,and, after ascertaining it had sustainedno-- ' injury itself, proceeded to NewYork.

STRIKE RULE IS CHANGED.

Coal Miners Make Strikes More DifficultWage Conference Called.

Indianapolis, Jan. 29. The UnitedMineworkers convention today finishedchanging and bringing up to date theconstitution and by-law- s. The im- -

oprtant changes are:The changing of the power to.vote a

strike from two-thir- the membershipof the national executive board to a fulltwo-thir- ds membership of the organiz-

ation; fixirg a uniform initiation fee ol$10 for miners and $2.50 for bdys be-

tween 14 and 16 years of ge; providingfree admission to the organization forboys that are orphans of union miners,and placing a fine of $10 on officers oflocal unions that issue transfer cardsto miners that are three months deiln-quen- t.

The convention adjourned this after-noon. A conference with the operatorswill be held tomorrow. ,

Defeated by Ladrones.Manila, Jan. 29. It is reported here

that the volunteer force organized atBoliano, Province of Zambales, for thepurpose of disposing of the Ladrones inthat vicinity, has been defeated andthat three Americans, including Mr.Osborne, a teacher, were killed. TheLadrones outnumbered the volunteers,surrounded the latter and boloed them.The Americans died fighting. The de-

tails of the affair obtainable are at.present meager. -

Mob Holds Up Coal Train.Chicago, Jan. 29. A mob of nearly

500 men, women and boys held up aChicago & Northwestern coal train atWebster avenue, on the Wisconsin division, and carried away the contentsof five cars before dispersed by the po-

lice. Women led the attack, uncoupling, the cars and intimidating thetrain crew. For three hours traffic wassuspended, while the mob increasedto more than 1,000 persona.

MINISTER BOWEN WILL REACH AGREE-

MENT WITH THE POWERS.

Blockade Is to Be Raised ImmediatelyGreat Britain Is Willing to Accept 30Per Cent of Customs Receipts as aGuarantee for Indemnity, but GermanyWants 50 Per Cent.

Caracas, Jan. 28. The AssociatedPress correspondent has just received acommunication from the British navalofficers at La Guayra informing himthat the blockade will be raised today.

Not Confirmed by Bowen.Washington, Jan. 28. There is no

information in Washington to justifythe positive statement contained in theCaracas dispatch that the Venezuelanblockade will be raised today. Min-ister Bowen continues hopeful that such

happy consummation will result fromthe pending negotiations, as the latestproposition to the allied governments isregarded by him as an eminently favorable one. He is still waiting formalreplies to that proposition from GreatBritaia and Germany, and on these willdepend the question whether the block-

ade is to be raised.As indicated in a Rome dispatch re

ceived last night, the question now tobe determined is the amount of customs receipts which are to be given as

guarantee. Great Britain is believedto be favorable to accepting the 30 percent offered by Mr. Bowen, while Germany is euppoesd to be insisting on 50per cent.

Minister Bowen declines to discussthe question in any of its phasep, norwill he disclose what is the actualamount of guaranty he has been offered.

With the promptness which hascharacterized all its actions in the present emergency, the Italian governmenthas cabled to its fleet commander inVenezuelan waters to withdraw fromthe blockade as soon as the ships of thepowers do po. Information to thiseffect was received by the Italian ambassador today.

FOR CENTRAL WASHINGTON.

Possibilities of Getting Larger Supply ofWater for Irrigation.

Washington, Jan. 28. An examination has recently been made by F. C.Calkins, of the geological survey, ofthe possibilities of increasing thewater supply of portions of CentralWashington. Kittitas valley is one ofthe areas in which irrigation is alreadyextensively practiced, water beingdrawn from the Yakima river and itstributaries. Plans have matured for "

the construction of ditches from theUpper Yakima, which will materiallyextend the Irrigated area to the eastand southeast in the near future.

Attention as also given to a strip ofdesert land just east of the Columbiariver, now used as a stock ranch, andalso-- to a portion of the great wheatgrowing region adjoining it on thenorth and east, which extends north-ward into the Big Bend of the Colum-bia and eastward beyond the Idaho '

boundary. As the district has an aridclimate, and its eastern portion is practically without surface streams, the object of the examination was to determine the practicability of sinking deepwells as a means of obtaining water,and "especially to determine whetherartesian flows could be found. Irriga-tion from the Columbia, except to alimited extent, on its lowest terraces,'appears to be impracticable because ofthe depth and steepness of the sides ofthe canyon through which the riverflows. "4 East of the Columbia river the in-

vestigations include Crab creek, theonly perennial stream traversing theregion, but its waters were found tobe no more than sufficient for the irri- - :

gation of its own bottom.In the wheat lands, where all crops

are raised by dry farming, and wherewater for stock and domestic uses wasformerly brought from springs, some-times at great distances, the possibilityof increasing the present number ofdeep wells was carefully considered.

The information gathered indicates,that a supply of water sufficient forpresent needs can be obtained by - deepdrilling throughout the region examinedat depths of from 400 to 675 feet.While there are no flowing artesianwells, the deep waters are found to beunder pressure, and it is believed thatin certain of the lower wells along theNorthern Pacific road an artesian flowcould be obtained by proper casing. Itdoes not eeem that any considerableportion of the wheat lands can be irri-gated from deep wells, or that waterfrom this source for irrigatioa can befound in sufficient quantities in the un-cultivated land east of the Columbia,though it is believed that in this sec-tion deep wells for stock-waterin- g pur-poses may be profitably sunk at somepoints. . -- - ''

Coal Tipple Burned. rTerre Haute, Ind., Jan. 28. The

tipple at the Harris-Lankyfo- rd mine,three miles west of here, burned today..James Wesner was killed and four others were bo badly suffocated that their'recovery is doubtful.1 The mine baaonly one entrance, and the work ofrescue was dangerous, owing to the de--struction of tha hoisting machinery.Twenty men were hoisted to the surfaceby means of ropes. All were more oress suffocated.dressed, 774c.81 years old. -