Cold Lab Report_Final

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Lab Report from my physics class

Transcript of Cold Lab Report_Final

  • Alex Winkley

    Cold Lab Report

    Setup

    The cold lab requires a few select materials in order to be completed. First we set up the super conductor and the power supply unit. Next were the two muli-meters that would enable us to observe the temperature and voltage being put out by the conductor as the cooling is occurring. We then wrote a program to read this data into LabView and then be exported from LabView for further analysis after the data collection was completed (Fig. 1). We then connected the conductor to the power supply unit using the yellow wires to allow the voltage in and the black wires to accurately measure the voltage out.

    Fig. 1 The code for our program in LabView that we used to collect data.

    Data

    Here we have a graph of the data put out by our three trials as well as the Curie Temperature for each trial (Fig. 2).

  • Alex Winkley

    Fig. 2 The graph of our three trials which shows the Curie Temperature for each.

    Analysis/Error

    In the experiment guide, a Curie Temperature, where the resistance goes to zero, is given but the Curie Temperature that we found was not consistent with the one given by the experiment guide. Upon averaging the three temperatures together and finding the correlating standard deviation, we determined our Curie Temperature to be 116.75 2.098 .

    Here we have each individual trial with the correlating standard deviation for each.

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    Temperature [K]

    Temperature [K] vs Resistance [Ohms]

    Trial 1

    Trial 2

    Trial 3

  • Alex Winkley

    Fig.3 Data and Error Bars for Trial 1.

    Fig. 4 Data and Error Bars for Trial 2.

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    Temperature [K]

    Trial 1

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    Temperature [K]

    Trial 2

  • Alex Winkley

    Fig. 5 Data and Error Bars for Trial 3.

    In order to find the error associated with all three trials as a whole, we found the average resistance for each temperature value and calculated the standard deviation for those values. We used those standard deviations to calculate the error bars for this graph.

    Fig. 6 Data and Error Bars for Average Trial.

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    Trial 3

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    Average Trial

  • Alex Winkley

    We found the standard deviation for the average trial in our experiment at its max to be 1.737 and at its minimum to be 0.556. There are a couple possible sources for this error. The most obvious source is external noise from the system we were working in. When we took the superconductor out of the liquid nitrogen, we let it reheat on the lab table about 1 foot from a computer. This could have caused the super conductor to be heated by the computer which would tamper with our results. Another source of error is the room we were working in, in that there were a lot of people in there, and the resulting combination of everyones body heat could have affected our results as well. Looking back on this experiment and into the future when helping other students with this experiment, I would try to limit these factors and make it so that they try to eliminate as much external noise as possible.

    **CHASE GARNETT AND GALEN RICHARD SHOULD RECEIVE AN AD LAB CHECK FOR E01 AS HE HELPED GUIDE ME THROUGH THE SET-UP AND EXECUTION OF

    THE MEASUREMENTS OF THIS EXPERIMENT**

  • Alex Winkley

    Reference List

    Leon-Rossano, L. (1997). An inexpensive and easy experiment to measure the electrical resistance of high-Tc superconductors as a function of temperature. American Journal of Physics, 65(10). Retrieved April 30, 2015.