Coffee, Please, No Dirt

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http://buyorganiccoffee.org/1190/coffee-please-no-dirt/ Coffee, Please, No Dirt We have found yet another reason to only buy whole bean healthy organic coffee from reputable suppliers. A recent article in the Washington Post noted that as coffee supplies diminish and prices go up some suppliers of ground coffee are adding things to their coffee. The title of the article is Dirt, corn twigs, soybeans and other fillers are appearing in coffee. Cream and sugar may not be the only additives in your morning cup of coffee. Tough growing conditions and rising demand are leading some coffee producers to mix in wheat, soybean, brown sugar, rye, barley, acai seeds, corn, twigs and even dirt. As we noted in our recent article Brazil Drought Drives Arabica Prices Higher there is a historic drought in Brazil, the country that produces more coffee than anyone else. The ten million or so bag deficit in production this year will amount to about a forty billion cup of coffee deficit! Looks like some folks are looking to make up for ten million missing bags of coffee by adding corn, soybeans, etc. and grinding it all up to sell. This is actually an age old trick to reduce the cost of doing business while not reducing what they sell the coffee for. Coffee, Please, No Dirt I suppose that you could say this at the coffee shop but there really are good ways to avoid drinking coffee with dirt in it. First of all if you buy whole bean organic coffee you can see that all you are getting are the beans. If you go to a coffee shop where you see them roasting the beans you could probably tell if they were ladling in twigs, soybeans and dirt along with the green coffee beans. And, if you buy organic coffee you are buying into a supply chain that starts with avoidance of insecticides and fungicides and ends with careful separation of organic coffee from regular coffee all the way to the roaster. More than Soybeans to Avoid When buying regular coffee added corn, soybeans and dirt are not all that you need to watch out for. The Australian Food Standards Authority found metals such as aluminum and zinc, pesticide residues, and many other unwelcome substances in commercially available regular coffee. It turns out that over one hundred thirty contaminants can be found in a cup of regular coffee. These chemicals can cause impairment of the immune system, liver problems, and even several types of cancer. Look for organic coffee and look for one of the three trusted seals: USDA, UTZ or Rainforest Alliance. Certified Organic Rather than saying coffee please not dirt just look for a certification seal on the bag. The USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) is the gold standard. The fact that coffee is USDA organic coffee tells us that sustainable agricultural practices were used and that the organic coffee is free of many of the pesticide, herbicide, and synthetic fertilizer residues that can be found on regular coffee products.

Transcript of Coffee, Please, No Dirt

  • 1. By: www.BuyOrganicCoffee.org

2. We have found yet another reason toonly buy whole bean healthy organiccoffee from reputable suppliers. 3. A recent article in the WashingtonPost noted that as coffee suppliesdiminish and prices go up somesuppliers of ground coffee are addingthings to their coffee. 4. The title of the article is Dirt, corntwigs, soybeans and otherfillers are appearing in coffee. 5. Cream and sugar may not be the onlyadditives in your morning cup ofcoffee. 6. Tough growing conditions and risingdemand are leading some coffeeproducers to mix in wheat, soybean,brown sugar, rye, barley, acai seeds,corn, twigs and even dirt. 7. As we noted in our recentarticle Brazil Drought DrivesArabica Prices Higher there is ahistoric drought in Brazil, the countrythat produces more coffee thananyone else. 8. The ten million or so bag deficit inproduction this year will amount toabout a forty billion cup of coffeedeficit! 9. Looks like some folks are looking tomake up for ten million missing bagsof coffee by adding corn, soybeans,etc. and grinding it all up to sell. 10. This is actually an age old trick toreduce the cost of doing businesswhile not reducing what they sell thecoffee for. 11. Coffee, Please, No Dirt 12. I suppose that you could say this atthe coffee shop but there really aregood ways to avoid drinking coffeewith dirt in it. 13. First of all if you buy whole beanorganic coffee you can see that all youare getting are the beans. 14. If you go to a coffee shop where yousee them roasting the beans youcould probably tell if they were ladlingin twigs, soybeans and dirt along withthe green coffee beans. 15. And, if you buy organic coffee you arebuying into a supply chain that startswith avoidance of insecticides andfungicides and ends with carefulseparation of organic coffee fromregular coffee all the way to theroaster. 16. More than Soybeans to Avoid 17. When buying regular coffee addedcorn, soybeans and dirt are not all thatyou need to watch out for. 18. The Australian Food StandardsAuthority found metals such asaluminum and zinc, pesticideresidues, and many other unwelcomesubstances in commercially availableregular coffee. 19. It turns out that over one hundredthirty contaminants can be found in acup of regular coffee. 20. These chemicals can causeimpairment of the immune system,liver problems, and even severaltypes of cancer. 21. Look for organic coffee and look forone of the three trusted seals: USDA,UTZ or Rainforest Alliance. 22. Certified Organic 23. Rather than saying coffee please notdirt just look for a certification seal onthe bag. 24. The USDA (United States Departmentof Agriculture) is the gold standard. 25. The fact that coffee is USDA organiccoffee tells us that sustainableagricultural practices were used andthat the organic coffee is free of manyof the pesticide, herbicide, andsynthetic fertilizer residues that can befound on regular coffee products. 26. Two other good choices are UTZ andRainforest Alliance. 27. These folks also certify coffee asorganic but they also help small coffeefarmers find buyers and teach thethings that farmers need to know inorder to produce good quality organiccoffee.