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Blackboard Exemplary Course Program

Blackboard Exemplary Course Program

2011 Submission Instructions and Form

Deadline: January 18, 2011

Thank you for your interest in the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program (ECP). Complete this submission form following the instructions below. We look forward to reviewing your course!

Benefits of Participating in the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program

There are many benefits to participating in the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program. As a participant submitting your course for review you will:

Reflect on your own course design through a self-evaluation of your course and gain new perspective and insights on your course

Receive detailed feedback on your own course development on the best practices you are employing or areas in which it can be improved

Apply lessons learned from the Exemplary Course Rubric to your own courses or those you are helping to develop

Gain professional development experience and recognition for your accomplishments and participation in the program

All courses will be reviewed and will receive detailed feedback on their design, interaction and collaboration, assessment and learner support components.

Courses rated as Exemplary, each author (or authoring team) and the exemplary aspects of their course, will be promoted on Blackboard websites and in various promotional materials selected by Blackboard. Lessons learned and best practices from the course author (or authoring team) will be shared with the eLearning community. A representative from the award winning course teams will be invited to attend BbWorld 2011 to share their experiences about exemplary course design with the Blackboard eLearning community. See the OFFICIAL RULES for this promotion (page 13) for more details.

How to Submit your Course for Review

1. Provide information about you and your course in the form below (page 4).

2. Self-evaluate your course using the Blackboard Exemplary Course rubric (listed in the Appendix of this document pages 15-18) and fill in the information requested in the submission form below (pages 15-20).

3. Create a back-up of your course and restore it for access on your server for use by the evaluation team (see page 2 for instructions).

4. Upload the completed Submission Form at http://www.blackboard.com/ecp.

Submitted courses are reviewed by a team of peer reviewers and the Exemplary Course Program Directors. The reviewers use a detailed rubric to evaluate each course. The results are compiled and the feedback is returned to each course submitter.

Self-Evaluation Instructions

1. Print a copy of this submission form. Having a copy of the Exemplary Course Rubric will assist you evaluate your course.

2. For each section of the Submission form below (e.g., Course Design, Learner Interaction & Collaboration, Assessment) turn to the appropriate section of the rubric to view the descriptions to help identify which rubric option (Exemplary, Accomplished, Promising, Incomplete) to select.

3. Make your selections for each item using the pull-down menus in each section.

4. Be sure to provide narrative descriptions and examples as requested.

5. List and describe three stand-out practices from your course that you wish to draw to the reviewers attention for consideration as a best practices for the broader learning community.

Submission Guidelines

Members of the Blackboard user community are welcome to submit courses for the 2011 Blackboard Exemplary Course Program. Courses being submitted must be in one of the following Blackboard Learning Systems:

Blackboard Learn Enterprise License

Blackboard Learn Vista Enterprise License[footnoteRef:1] [1: Formerly WebCT Vista Enterprise License]

Blackboard Learn CE Enterprise License[footnoteRef:2] [2: Formerly WebCT Campus Edition Institution License]

Blackboard Learn Basic License

Blackboard Learn CE Basic License[footnoteRef:3] [3: Formerly WebCT Campus Edition Focus License]

Blackboard Learn ANGEL Edition[footnoteRef:4] [4: Formerly ANGEL Learning Management Suite]

If there is no evidence of interaction, using such tools as discussion, chat, email, blogs, wikis, or podcasts, video, synchronous or asynchronous collaboration the course will not be considered for review.

The reviewers will need online access to a copy of the course so they can evaluate it. The reviewers will need designer or course builder access to the archived course instance until at least July 31, 2011. Courses submitted for review must have ended by the submission deadline. Please do not provide us access to courses in which students are currently enrolled. If student privacy is an issue, or you have questions about providing online access of the course to reviewers please contact us at [email protected] to discuss possible alternatives.

Submission Instructions

The Submission Form consists of 3 sections:

1. Information about You and Your Course

2. Self evaluation of the Course Design, Interaction and Collaboration, Assessment and Learner Support of your course

3. Course Access and Permission Information

For each of the elements in Section 2, criteria statements and a space for narrative information are provided. For each Criterion Section, select from the drop down list the choice that best applies to your course.

In the Applicants Narrative field in each section, please provide a clear, succinct explanation of how you think your course meets the criteria in each section as well as examples of exemplary components. Your explanations are very important to the course evaluators, as they will be visiting your course to examine and verify the information you have provided.

A sample completed submission is available here:

http://kb.blackboard.com/display/EXEMPLARY/2010+Exemplary+Course+Program+Documents

Please fill out this form completely. When you have completed the Submission Form, save it using the following example,

Submitters name = Jill McMaster

Short name of course = Geog 101

File name = McMaster_Geog101.doc

The completed form should be uploaded through the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program website (http://www.blackboard.com/ecp) no later than January 18, 2011.

All supplementary materials should be converted to electronic form (e.g., PDF, Flash, Powerpoint, or a screencast movie made with Camtasia, Jing, or a similar tool) and attached through the submission web page. We will not accept hard copies of supplementary material.

All submissions will be acknowledged by email within three business days of receipt of the submission form. If you have any questions about the submission process, please e-mail [email protected]

Blackboard Exemplary Course Program

Submission Form

Deadline: January 18, 2011

Information about You and Your Course

Submission Information

Submitter Name

Title/Rank

Institution

Department

Email Address

Daytime Telephone

Instructor Name (instructor(s) who taught the course) if different from above

Title/Rank

Institution/Organization

Department

Email Address

Daytime Telephone

Names, Titles and email addresses of instructional designers or others who significantly contributed to the development of this course (add more lines as needed).

Course Information

Course Title

Course Number

Language of Instruction

Number of semester/quarter hour credits

Which version of Blackboard Learn was used to deliver this course? Check one.

|_| Blackboard Learning System Enterprise License

|_| Blackboard Learning System Vista Enterprise License

|_| Blackboard Learning System CE Enterprise License

|_| Blackboard Learning System Basic License

|_| Blackboard Learning System CE Basic License

|_| Blackboard Learning System ANGEL Edition

The environment for this course can best be described as blended or totally online (choose one).

|_| Blended (a combination of face-to-face and online)

|_| Totally online (a fully online course with no face-to-face component)

Student Target level (check all that apply)

|_| K-12 Undergraduate:

|_|1st year |_|2nd year |_|3rd year |_|4th year

|_|Diploma/2 year Degree or Similar*

|_|Certificate|_|Graduate Level|_| Professional Development |_| Other

*e.g., Further Education, Vocational Technical Schools, or Community Colleges

Number of terms this course has been offered in its present configuration.

Number of students who were enrolled in the course you are submitting for review.

In order to acknowledge commercially produced content, please indicate where in the course this content may be found (e.g., Course Cartridges, e-packs, or publisher-supported material. Please provide the name of the publisher and the title of the Course Cartridge or e-pack.).

Self Evaluation: Course Design

Course Design addresses elements of instructional design. For the purpose of this program, course design includes such elements as the structure of the course, learning objectives, and instructional strategies.

Use the Exemplary Course Rubric for detailed criteria applicable to the rating choices for each area below.

Goals and ObjectivesRating:

Goals and objectives are easily located within the course

Course goals and objectives are explained clearly

Objectives reflect desired learning outcomes

Objectives are provided for specific units/modules of the course

Content PresentationRating:

Content is provided in manageable segments

Content is easily navigated; progression within units/modules is intuitive or obvious

Content is presented using a variety of media (e.g., text, visual, audio) as appropriate to the audience, learning goals, and subject

Supplementary content materials are provided or suggested for further study

Learner EngagementRating:

Instructional strategies are designed to help students reach course goals and objectives

Learners are provided clear guidance on how to use course content to achieve stated learning outcomes

Learning activities encourage higher order thinking (problem solving, analysis, critical reflection, etc.)

There is evidence of individualized learning experiences (e.g., remedial or advanced activities) are provided as needed

Technology UseRating:

Tools available within the CMS are used in ways that further student learning

Arrangement of tools facilitates efficient learning experiences

Innovative uses of tools or technologies enable students to learn in a variety of ways

Applicants narrative: How does the design of this course meet the criteria stated above? Please provide a narrative of up to 500 words describing the course design components you feel are exemplary. Be sure to include within your narrative evidence of exemplary course design. This evidence can be up to five (5) locations within your course. As needed please provide screen shots or other artifacts to illustrate exemplary course design which are not otherwise accessible by the reviewer.

If this is a blended learning environment, describe why the online components of the course were chosen and how they relate to the other learning activities in the course.

Narrative and Example Course Locations:

Self Evaluation: Interaction & Collaboration

Interaction and Collaboration can take many forms. The ECP criteria place emphasis on the type and amount of interaction and collaboration within an online environment.

Interaction denotes communication between and among learners and instructors, synchronously or asynchronously. Collaboration is a subset of interaction and refers specifically to those activities in which groups are working interdependently toward a shared result. This differs from group activities that can be completed by students working independently of one another and then combining the results, much as one would when assembling a jigsaw puzzle with parts of the puzzle worked out separately then assembled together. A learning community is defined here as the sense of belonging to a group, rather than each student perceiving himself/herself studying independently.

Use the Exemplary Course Rubric for detailed criteria applicable to the rating choices for each area below.

Please note: If there is no evidence of interaction, using such tools as discussion, chat, email, blogs, wikis, or podcasts, the course will not be considered for review, unless this is a blended course and evidence is provided that interactions occur in the face-to-face environment (see Applicants Narrative section below). To protect student information, you may copy several examples (at least six) of student interaction, hide student identity, and re-post as course content with a heading ECP Interaction Examples.

Communication StrategiesRating:

Both asynchronous (discussions, blogs, wikis, etc.) and synchronous (chat, videoconferencing, virtual classroom, etc.) activities are available as appropriate

Asynchronous communication activities provide students with opportunities for reflection, problem-solving, and/or other higher order thinking

Synchronous communication activities benefit from the real-time presence of instructor and/or peers allowing for interactions of a rapid response nature regarding content

Development of a Learning CommunityRating:

Communication activities are used to further student learning and/or build a sense of community among learners

Collaborative activities, if included, are designed not only to help students learn course content but to practice/improve upon their skills working on a team

Student-to-student interaction is encouraged and/or required

Student-to-instructor interaction is encouraged and/or required

Interaction LogisticsRating:

Levels of participation required by students are explained clearly, as are communication protocols (e.g., what constitutes a good versus poor discussion posting)

Students are provided with a rubric or other appropriate guidelines indicating how their course participation and interaction will be assessed

The instructor takes an active role in facilitating and moderating discussions, including providing feedback to students

Applicants narrative: How does interaction and collaboration within this course meet the criteria stated above? Please provide a narrative of up to 500 words describing the interaction and collaboration components you feel are exemplary. You may also include, within your narrative, up to five (5) locations within your course that you consider evidence of exemplary interaction and/or collaboration.

Explain the nature and purpose of the communication tools used in the course, include evidence that the majority of the students were interacting in a meaningful way. If students are expected to interact with each other or collaborate in groups, include examples of the assignments that cause them to do so. Also ensure that a sufficient number of discussion threads/postings are included with your submission. You may compile (WebCT or ANGEL) or collect (Blackboard) to download discussion threads and then edit the file to change student names. Provide examples or discussion protocols if they are used.

If this is a blended learning environment, and if online interaction/collaboration is not an important element of this blended learning course, please indicate why and explain how it occurs face-to-face.

If this is a blended learning environment, describe why the online interaction and collaboration components of the course were chosen and how they relate to the offline components of the course.

Narrative and Example Course Locations:

Self Evaluation: Assessment

Assessment focuses on instructional activities designed to measure progress towards learning outcomes, provide feedback to students and instructor, and/or enable grade assignment. This section addresses the quality and type of student assessments within the course.

Use the Exemplary Course Rubric for detailed criteria applicable to the rating choices for each area below.

Expectations: Rating:

Assignments and assessments are aligned with stated goals and objectives

Rubrics or descriptive criterion measures are provided to make expectations clear

Instructions offer sufficient detail to ensure learner understanding

Assessment Design: Rating:

Assessments are appropriate for measuring the skills and knowledge students have acquired

Assessments require the use of higher order thinking skills (e.g., analysis, evaluation, etc.)

Assessments are designed to predict the learners performance outside of the instructional environment (transfer)

Multiple assessment opportunities are included to provide a record/baseline of performance over time

Multiple types of assessments are provided to address learning style differences and enhance motivation

Self-assessment: Rating:

Multiple opportunities for self-assessment are provided

Self-assessments provide feedback that helps students to improve

Applicants narrative: How do the assessments within this course meet the criteria stated above? Please provide a narrative of up to 500 words describing the assessment and assignment components you feel are exemplary and include examples to support your narrative. You may also include, within your narrative, up to five (5) locations within your course that you consider evidence of exemplary assessment and assignments.

Provide examples of student-teacher engagement in assessment and feedback from the instructor. These could be in the form of screen shots or other artifacts such as a sample assignment rubric, the completed assignment and instructor feedback.

If this is a blended learning environment, describe why the online assessment components of the course were chosen and how they relate to the face-to-face components of the course.

Narrative and Example Course Locations:

Self Evaluation: Learner Support

Learner Support addresses the support resources made available to students taking the course. Such resources may be accessible within or external to the course environment. Specifically, learner support resources address a variety of student services including, but not limited to:

Use the Exemplary Course Rubric for detailed criteria applicable to the rating choices for each area below.

Orientation to Course and CMS: Rating:

A course orientation is available for students

An orientation to the course management system is available for students

Publisher produced materials and/or content/tools external to the course environment provide support for their use

Supportive Software (Plug-ins): Rating:

Links to necessary software plug-ins and instructions for downloading, installing, and using them are provided

Instructor Role and Information: Rating:

Contact information and/or links are provided to reach

the instructor

technical help

the institutions services for course logistics (e.g., registration, payment)

the institutions learning support services (e.g., library, writing center)

The Instructors role and expected response times are clearly explained

Course/Institutional Policies and Support: Rating:

Course and institutional policies are included regarding

Appropriate use of online resources

Plagiarism

Netiquette

Other behavioral topics, as needed

Technical Accessibility Issues: Rating:

File formats and necessary software are explained

Standard file formats are used

Alternative file formats are provided where needed

High-bandwidth content and activities are accompanied by low-bandwidth alternatives

Accommodations for Disabilities: Rating:

Visual display elements are appropriate (e.g., colors, text sizes, white space)

Images use alt-tags

Audio elements provide transcripts and volume controls

Feedback: Rating:

Students have the opportunity to provide feedback

About the course content

About the course design and operation

During the course

After the course

Applicants Narrative How does the learner support provided to students meet the criteria stated above? Please provide narrative of up to 500 words describing the support components you feel are exemplary. You may also include, within your narrative, up to five (5) locations within your course that you consider evidence of exemplary support.

If this is a blended learning environment, describe why the online components of the course were chosen and how they relate to the face to face components of the course.

Narrative and Example Course Locations:

Self Evaluation: Identify Exemplary Practices

Describe what you think are three stand-out practices in your course. These are the top three items you wish to highlight for reviewers to consider as exemplary practices to share with the broader eLearning community.

Course Access and Permission Information

Course Access

The course to be reviewed must be a copy of a previously offered course. For the purposes of the ECP review the course should not be actively used for teaching. In addition, once you have applied, this copy of the course site should not be revised or modified. For these reasons you (or your system administrator) should create a copy of the course and a new user ID (with Faculty, Course Builder or Designer access) to allow the reviewers to access the course.

Please contact your System Administrator for help creating a back-up of your course and providing access to it for the Exemplary Course Reviewers.

If student privacy is an issue, please contact us at [email protected] to discuss possible alternatives.

The reviewers will require access for at least a six-month period following the submission of this form. The password below must be valid until at least July 31, 2010; we reserve the right to disqualify your course if your username and password are not valid until July 31, 2010.

Please add any specific instructions related to account access.

Faculty/Designer/Course Builder Access:

URL:

Username:

Password:

special instructions:

If your course is selected as a Blackboard Exemplary Course, your course will be showcased within Blackboard.com and Blackboard Connections. Blackboard staff will work with you to address student privacy and intellectual property concerns.

Permissions

By submitting this course for consideration and providing access, you grant the right for the ECP Directors and members of the review team to enter your course for review purposes. Should your course be chosen as a Blackboard Exemplary Course, you also grant non-exclusive rights to the Program evaluators and Blackboard Inc. to use the materials submitted in professional and trade publications and conference presentations related to Blackboards Exemplary Course Program. This includes permission to move the course to a Blackboard server and provide guest access to the course on Blackboard.com. The ECP Directors and Blackboard Inc. agree to attribute the materials to their source (person or institution).

In honor of granting our collegial access to your course and in recognition of applicable copyright laws, the evaluators hereby attest that review access to the submitted course will be only for the purposes of this Program. Any files downloaded or printed will be used solely for review purposes and will not be further copied, distributed, or used in any course development without express written permission.

If you have any questions about the submission process, please email [email protected]

Thank you for participating in the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program.

BLACKBOARD INC.

EXEMPLARY COURSE AWARD WINNERS

OFFICIAL RULES

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY -- PURCHASING ANY GOOD OR SERVICE WILL NOT INCREASE THE ODDS OF WINNING

Award Winners: For the courses submitted that are deemed exemplary by the Blackboard judges, each team and the exemplary aspects of their course will be promoted on Blackboard Inc. (Blackboard or Sponsor) websites and in various promotional materials selected by Blackboard (the Promotion). Lessons learned and best practices from the course author (or authoring team) will be shared with the eLearning community.

CONSUMER DISCLOSURE

Blackboard, the sponsor of the Exemplary Course Program, may invite a representative from up to 10 award winning course teams (Award winners) to attend BbWorld11 to share their experiences about exemplary course design with the Blackboard eLearning community. Airfare to BbWorld11, hotel accommodations, and BbWorld2011 registration will be at the Award Winners cost. Winners are selected based on the criteria identified by Blackboard in the application process for the Exemplary Course Program. Blackboard shall be the sole judge and all decisions of the judges are final.

Award Winners will be notified by email and phone by April 30, 2011.

Employees and Directors of Blackboard and any participating partner company, their respective parent, affiliated and subsidiary companies, advertising and promotion agencies, judges and legal advisors, and the immediate family or members of the same households of such employees or directors are not eligible. By entering, you agree to these Official Rules and the decisions of Blackboard, which are final and binding in all respects. Blackboard assumes no responsibility for the lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate, stolen, misdirected, illegible or altered entries.

The Promotion is governed by the laws of the United States with venue in Washington, D.C., and all claims must be resolved under District of Columbia law without regard to choice of law rules, first by mediation, and then by arbitration, in the District of Columbia, under the rules of the American Arbitration Association.

Blackboard assumes no responsibility for any error, omission, interruption, deletion, defect, or delay in operation or transmission; communications line failure; theft or destruction of or unauthorized access to promotion entries or entry forms; or alteration of entries or entry forms. Blackboard is not responsible for any problems with or technical malfunction of any telephone network or lines, computer online systems, servers or providers, computer equipment, software, failure of any e-mail or mailed-in entry to be received on account of technical problems or traffic congestion on the Internet or at any website, or any combination thereof, including any injury or damage to participants' or any other persons' computers related to or resulting from participation or downloading any materials in this Giveaway. In no event shall there be a greater number of prizes awarded than the published number.

By entering this Promotion, entrants and Prize Winners: (1) agree to be bound by these Official Rules; (2) agree to release Blackboard and its subsidiaries, affiliates, divisions, advertising and promotion, fulfillment and/or judging agencies, related entities from any and all liability for any loss, harm, damages, costs or expenses, including without limitation property damages, personal injury and/or death arising out of participating in this Promotion, or the acceptance, possession, use or misuse of any prize and claims based on publicity rights, defamation or invasion of privacy and merchandise delivery; and (3) Award Winners consent to the use of their names, voices, pictures, and likenesses for advertising and promotional purposes in any medium throughout the world in perpetuity without additional compensation unless prohibited by law. Sponsor reserves the right to prohibit any entrant from participating in the Promotion if, at their sole discretion, Sponsor finds such entrant to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the Promotion, or if such entrant repeatedly shows a disregard for, or attempts to, circumvent these Rules, or acts: (a) in a manner the Sponsor determines to be not fair or equitable; (b) with an intent to annoy, threaten or harass any other entrant the Sponsor; or (c) in any other disruptive manner. Any failure by the Sponsor to enforce any of these Rules shall not constitute a waiver of such Rules.

Caution: any attempt by any person to deliberately damage any website or undermine legitimate operation of the Promotion is a violation of criminal and civil laws. Should such an attempt be made, blackboard reserves the right to seek damages from any such person to the fullest extent permitted by law.

To request a winners list (available after July 30, 2011) send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to be received within 60 days after selection date to: Blackboard Inc., 650 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20001. Please specify Exemplary Course Program Award Winners on the outer envelope.

If you have any questions about this Promotion, please contact Jan Poston Day, Blackboard Inc., 650 Massachusetts Ave, NW 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20001.

Permission to reprint this form is granted to educational institutions and academic researchers provided that the criteria are reprinted in their entirety and without modification. Non-academic use requires permission of the copyright holders.

Copyright 1997-2011. Blackboard Inc. All rights reserved. Blackboard and Blackboard Learn are trademarks or registered trademarks of Blackboard Inc. or its subsidiaries in the United States and/or other countries.

2011 Blackboard Exemplary Course Program Rubric

The Blackboard Exemplary Course Program began in 2000 with the goal of identifying and disseminating best practices for designing engaging online courses and courses with online components.

Using the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program Rubric, instructors and course designers are able to evaluate how well their own course conforms to best practices for Course Design, Interaction and Collaboration, Assessment and Learner Support.Furthermore, they learn and better understand by internalizing the evaluation criteria, what makes an exemplary course.

The Blackboard Exemplary Course Program Rubric details a range of criteria to rate performance in each component of the course. The performance ratings are Exemplary, Accomplished, Promising, and Incomplete. Detailed feedback on expectations needed to meet to achieve a specific rating for each component in the course is provided.

Using the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program Rubric offers a number of advantages:

The ECP Rubric allows course designers and instructors to become better judges of the quality of their own work. It provides detailed information about areas of strengths and areas of their course in need of improvement.

The ECP Rubric allows assessment of online and hybrid/blended courses (those which have online and face-to-face components) to be more objective and consistent. An increased focus on student learning outcomes demands development of high quality courses whether they are fully online, or have online components.

The ECP Rubric reduces the amount of time it takes to assess the quality and completeness of a course. This is especially helpful if you are using the rubric to assess the courses across a program of study or the work of multiple course developers.

For more information about the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program, best practices in course design, and examples of exemplary courses please visit http://www.blackboard.com/ecp.

Page 1 of 1 1997-2011. Blackboard Inc.

Content Presentat-ion

Goals and Objectives

Course Design (page 1 of 2)

Course Design addresses elements of instructional design. For the purpose of this program, course design includes such elements as structure of the course, learning objectives, organization of content, and instructional strategies.

Content is made available or chunked in manageable segments (i.e., presented in distinct learning units or modules); navigation is intuitive; content flows in a logical progression; content is presented using a variety of appropriate mechanisms (content modules, single pages, links to external resources, RSS Feeds, print material); content is enhanced with visual and auditory elements; supplementary resources are made available (course CDs, textbooks, course manuals, etc.)

Goals and objectives are easily located within the course; are clearly written at the appropriate level and reflect desired outcomes; are written in measureable outcomes (students know what they are expected to be able to do), are made available in a variety of areas in the course (within the syllabus and each individual learning unit)

Exemplary

Content is made available or chunked in manageable segments (i.e., presented in distinct learning units or modules); navigation is somewhat intuitive, but some exploring is required to determine the flow of content; content is presented using a variety of mechanisms (content modules, single pages, links to external resources, RSS Feeds, print material); visual and/or auditory elements occasionally enhance the content; supplementary resources are made available (course CDs, textbooks, course manuals, etc.);

Goals and objectives are located within the course syllabus or the individual learning units; objectives are written to reflect desired learning outcomes, although not all are written as measureable outcomes; students have some understanding of what is expected of them;

Accomplished

Some content segments are overly large (or possibly too small) for the specified objectives; navigation is only occasionally intuitive, thus the flow of content is sometimes not easily determined; the design does not avail of the content presentation tools (content modules, single pages, links); few or no visual and/or auditory elements are used to enhance the content; supplementary resources may be made available (course CDs, textbooks, course manuals, etc.)

Goals and objectives are not easily located within the course; are not clearly written in measurable learning outcomes; students may be unsure of what they are expected to be able to do; the level does not match the desired outcomes;

Promising

Content is not chunked into manageable segments; navigation is not intuitive and the flow of content is unclear; the design does not avail of the content presentation tools (content modules, single pages, links); no visual or auditory elements are used to enhance the content; supplementary resources are not made available (course CDs, textbooks, course manuals, etc.)

Goals and objectives are not easily located within the course; some are missing and others poorly written ; the level does not match the desired learning outcomes;

Incomplete

Technology Use

Learner Engage-ment

Course Design (page 2 of 2)

Tools available within the CMS are used to facilitate learning by engaging students with course content; CMS tools are used to reduce the labor-intensity of learning (e.g., providing links to needed resources where they will be used in the course); technologies are used creatively in ways that transcend traditional, teacher-centered instruction; a wide variety of delivery media are incorporated into the course;

It is clear how the instructional strategies will enable students to reach course goals and objectives; course design includes guidance for learners to work with content in meaningful ways (e.g., pre-reading outlines, web-quests, devil's advocate challenges, etc.); higher order thinking (e.g., analysis, problem solving, or critical reflection) is expected of learners and explained with examples or models; individualized instruction, remedial activities, or resources for advanced learning activities are provided;

Exemplary

Tools available within the CMS could be utilized more (or more creatively) to engage learners with course content; CMS tools are made available to assist students, but could be organized or arranged for even greater usefulness; technologies within the course are used in many cases merely to replicate traditional face-to-face instruction; there is some variety in the tools used to deliver instruction;

Instructional strategies are designed to help students to reach course goals and objectives, although this relationship may not be obvious to learners; guidance is provided, but could be improved with greater detail or depth; higher order thinking is required for some activities but is not well-explained or supported (e.g., by providing examples of "good answers"); differentiated instruction (such as remediation) may be available on a limited basis;

Accomplished

Tools available within the CMS are not used to their full extent or not used when it would be appropriate to do so; only a few tools (of those available within the CMS) are used in a way that streamlines access to materials and activities for students; technologies within the CMS are used primarily by instructors and not students ("students as recipients of content" model); there is little variety in use of technologies within the CMS;

It is not clear how the instructional strategies will help learners achieve course course goals and objectives; guidance in using content materials may only be provided on a limited basis; higher order thinking is not required or encouraged; differentiated instructional opportunities are not provided, although there may be supplementary content resources available;;;

Promising

Technologies used within the CMS do not engage students with learning; tools that could reduce the labor-intensity of online instruction are not utilized; students are not expected to use technologies available within the CMS; only a few technologies available within the CMS are used;

Instructional strategies do not provide students with skills needed to achieve course goals and objectives; content is provided but it is not clear what students are expected to do with it; higher order thinking is not expected from students; no supplementary resources or activities are provided for remediation or advanced study;

Incomplete

Interaction Logistics

Develop-ment of Learning Community

Communi-cation Strategies

Interaction and Collaboration

Interaction and Collaboration can take many forms. The ECP criteria place emphasis on the type and amount of interaction and collaboration within an online environment.

Interaction denotes communication between and among learners and instructors, synchronously or asynchronously. Collaboration is a subset of interaction and refers specifically to those activities in which groups are working interdependently toward a shared result. This differs from group activities that can be completed by students working independently of one another and then combining the results, much as one would when assembling a jigsaw puzzle with parts of the puzzle worked out separately then assembled together. A learning community is defined here as the sense of belonging to a group, rather than each student perceiving himself/herself studying independently.

Guidelines explaining required levels of participation (i.e., quantity of interactions) are provided; expectations regarding the quality of communications (e.g., what constitutes a "good" answer) are clearly defined; a rubric or equivalent grading document is included to explain how participation will be evaluated; the instructor actively participates in communications activities, including providing feedback to students; the instructor uses communication tools to provide course updates, reminders, special announcements, etc.;

Communication activities are designed to help build a sense of community among learners; student-to-student interactions are required as part of the course; students are encouraged to initiate communication with the instructor; collaboration activities (if included) reinforce course content and learning outcomes, while building workplace-useful skills such as teamwork, cooperation, negotiation, and consensus-building;

There are plentiful opportunities for synchronous and/or asynchronous interaction, as appropriate; asynchronous communication strategies promote critical reflection or other higher order thinking aligned with learning objectives; synchronous communication activities benefit from real-time interactions and facilitate "rapid response" communication (i.e., students gain practice discussing course content extemporaneously without looking up basic, declarative information);

Exemplary

Expectations of student participation in communication activities are given, but would benefit from more detail; expectations regarding the quality of communications are included, but may be sketchy and lack detail or illustrative examples; minimal information may be provided regarding grading criteria for communications activities; the instructor is occasionally involved in communication activities; the instructor sometimes takes advantage of CMS tools to post announcements, reminders, etc.;

Communication activities may help learners build a sense of community, but do not appear to be designed with this in mind; some student-to-student interaction is built into the course; students interact with the instructor, although primarily as a result of instructor-initiated contact; collaboration activities (if included) support some team-building skills, but may not purposefully integrate these elements;

Several communication activities are included to reinforce the desired learning outcomes; asynchronous communications sometimes require reflection or other higher order thinking; synchronous interactions are meaningful but may not take full advantage of the real-time presence of instructor and/or peers;

Accomplished

Instructor expectations of student interactions are not made clear; little information is provided regarding what constitutes a "good" response or posting; students are not given a clear set of criteria for how communications activities will be graded; the instructor appears to be largely absent from communications activities; few announcements, reminders, or other updates are provided;

Effort has been devoted to fostering a sense of community in the course, but only minimally. More focus is needed on designing activities and a course climate that foster student-to-student interactions as well as student-to-instructor interactions.

Communication strategies are included, however, they may not consistently reinforce desired learning outcomes; asynchronous communications are focused primarily on lower levels of thinking (e.g., summarizing, describing, interpreting, etc.); synchronous interactions are used mostly for instructor explanation or clarification of content, or other instructor-focused activities;

Promising

Few or no guidelines are provided to students regarding the desired quantity or quality of communications/interactions within the course; the instructor does not participate in communications activities with students;

Little to no attention has been devoted to building a sense of community in this course.

Little to no attention has been devoted to communication strategies; interaction activies that are included do not invoke critical thinking, reinforce learning, or take advantage of the specific strengths of the communication tools used;

Incomplete

Self-assessment

Assessment Design

Expectations

Assessment

Assessment focuses on instructional activities designed to measure progress towards learning outcomes, provide feedback to students and instructor, and/or enable grade assignment. This section addresses the quality and type of student assessments within the course.

Many opportunities for self-assessment are provided; self-assessments provide constructive, meaningful feedback;

Assessments appear to measure the performance they claim to measure (e.g., activities are explained using appropriate reading level and vocabulary); higher order thinking is required (e.g., analysis, problem-solving, etc.); assessments are designed to mimic authentic environments to facilitate transfer; assessment activites occur frequently throughout the duration of the course; multiple types of assessments are used (research paper, objective test, discussions, etc.)

Assessments match the goals & objectives; learners are directed to the appropriate objective(s) for each assessment; rubrics or descriptive criteria for desired outcomes are provided (models of "good work" may be shown, for example); instructions are written clearly and with sufficient detail to ensure understanding;

Exemplary

Some self-assessment activities are included; self-assessments provide feedback to learners;

Assessment activities have "face validity" (i.e., they appear to match the curriculum); some activities involve higher order thinking; assessment activities may focus on tasks similar to real-world application of skills; multiple assessments are included; at least three different types of assessments are used;

Assessments match the goals & objectives; rubrics or descriptive criteria for desired outcomes are included for some assessment activities; instructions are written clearly, with some detail included;

Accomplished

There may be self-assessment activities, but they are limited in scope and do not offer useful feedback;

It is not clear whether the assessment activities actually measure the desired skill; the vast majority of assessments require only low-level thinking (memorization, for example); assessment activities typically do not include tasks that are relevant beyond the scope of this course; multiple assessments are included; two types of assessments are included, at a minimum;

Students are assessed on the topics described in the course goals and objectives; there may be some explanation of how assessments will be scored/graded; instructions lack detail that would help students understand how to complete the activities;

Promising

A few self-assessments may be included, but they offer little more feedback than flash cards;

Assessment activities appear to lack validity due to bias, lack of clarity in questions or tasks, or because students are evaluated on performance unrelated to the stated objectives; no higher-order thinking skills are required to complete assessment activities; there is little or no evidence of authenticity built into assessments; assessments are too few and far apart for the course content;

Assessments bear little resemblance to goals & objectives; expectations or grading criteria are not provided; instructions are limited or absent;

Incomplete

Instructor Role and Information

Supportive Software (Plug-ins)

Orientation to Course and CMS

Learner Support (page 1 of 2)

Learner Support addresses the support resources made available to students taking the course. Such resources may be accessible within or external to the course environment. Specifically, learner support resources address a variety of student services including, but not limited to the following.

Contact information for the instructor is easy to find and includes multiple forms of communication (for example, e-mail, phone, chat, etc.); expected response time for e-mail replies is included; instructor's role within the course is explained (for example, whether he/she will respond to "tech support" type questions); the instructor's methods of collecting and returning work are clearly explained;

Clear explanations of optional and/or required software including any additional costs (in addition to the CMS) are provided within the course; software required to use course materials is listed with links to where it can be captured and installed; links are located within the course where learners will use the software (i.e., near the materials requiring its use);

Clearly labeled tutorial materials that explain how to navigate the CMS and the specific course are included; tutorials are found easily (few clicks) whether internal or external to the course, with easy return to other areas of the course; tutorial materials support multiple learning modalities: audio, visual, and text based;

Exemplary

Contact information for the instructor is included but may not be easy to find; contact information includes more than one type of communication tool; expected response time for e-mail replies may be included; instructor's role within the course not clearly spelled out to students; the instructor's methods of collecting and returning work are clearly explained;

Clear explanations of optional and/or required software (in addition to the CMS) are provided within the course; software required to use course materials is listed but links to where it can be captured and installed are not found near where it will be used;

Clearly labeled tutorial materials that explain how to navigate the CMS and the specific course are included; tutorials may not be easily accessed, or require the learner to leave course site without an easy return; tutorial materials support multiple learning modalities: audio, visual, and text based;

Accomplished

Contact information for the instructor is provided but not easy to find; contact information includes only one way to reach the instructor; no information concerning response time for e-mail replies is not included; little or no information is given regarding the instructor's role in the course; the instructor's methods of collecting and returning work are evident but not clearly explained;

Software (in addition to the CMS) required to use course materials is mentioned, but not explained; links to where it can be captured and installed are provided, although they may not be conveniently located;

Tutorial materials that explain how to navigate the CMS and/or the specific course may be evident, but not easily found; materials do not support multiple learning modalities and are text-based only;

Promising

Contact information for the instructor is sketchy, at best; no information concerning response time for e-mail replies is included; information regarding the instructor's role in the course is not included; Instructor's methods of collecting and returning work are confusing or non-existent;

The need for additional software required to use course materials may be mentioned; links to software may be missing or incomplete;

Tutorial materials explaining how to navigate the CMS or the specific course may be included but are difficult to find, lack detail, are not well organized, or are incomplete; tutorial materials that are included do not support multiple learning modalities;

Incomplete

Feedback

Accomm-odations

for Disabilities

Technical Accessibil-ity Issues

Course/

Institution-al Policies and Support

Learner Support (page 2 of 2)

Learners have the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design and course content both during course delivery and after course completion; feedback mechanisms allow students to participate anonymously in course evaluation;

Supportive mechanisms allow learners with disabilities to participate fully in the online community; the design and delivery of content integrate alternative resources (transcripts, for example) or enable assistive processes (voice recognition, for example) for those needing accommodation; links to institutional policies, contacts, and procedures for supporting learners with disabilities are included and easy to find; design factors such as color, text size manipulation, audio and video controls, and alt tags reflect universal accessibility considerations;

Course materials use standard formats to ensure accessibility; if specific software is required to which some learners may not have access, alternative file types are provided; large files are identified to help learners consider download times; alternative (smaller) files are provided where appropriate; video are streamed whenever possible; graphics are optimized for web delivery and display without needing extensive scrolling;

Links to institutional policies, materials, and forms relevant for learner success (for example, plagiarism policies) are clearly labeled and easy to find; links allow easy navigation from the course to the information and back; course/instructor policies regarding decorum, behavior, and netiquette are easy to find and written clearly to avoid confusion; links to institutional services such as the library, writing center, or financial aid office are clearly labeled and easy to find;

Exemplary

Learners have the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design and/or course content, but only after course completion; feedback mechanisms allow students to participate anonymously in course evaluation;

Supportive mechanisms allow learners with disabilities to participate in the online community for most activities; the design and delivery of content integrate some alternative resources or enable assistive processes for those needing accommodation; links to institutional policies, contacts, and procedures to support learners with disabilities are included but may not be easy to find; design factors such as color, text size manipulation, audio and video controls, and alt tags have been considered in some cases;

Course materials use standard formats to ensure accessibility; if specific software is required to which some learners may not have access, alternative file types are sometimes provided; large files are not identified as such; alternative (smaller) files are not provided; video files are streamed in some cases; graphics are not be optimized for web delivery but display without extensive scrolling;

Links to institutional policies, materials, and forms relevant for learner success (for example, plagiarism policies) are included but may require searching to find; links allow easy navigation from the course to the information and back; course/instructor policies regarding decorum, behavior, and netiquette are included and are written clearly to avoid confusion; links to institutional services such as the library, writing center, or financial aid office may be included but require searching to find;

Accomplished

Learners have the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design or course content, but only after course completion; feedback mechanisms do not guarantee privacy to the student;

Supportive mechanisms allow some learners with disabilities to participate fully in the online community; the design and delivery of content do not include alternative resources nor enable assistive processes for those needing accommodation; links to institutional policies, contacts, and procedures to support learners with disabilities are not evident; design factors such as color, text size manipulation, audio and video controls, and alt tags have not been considered;

Course materials use standard formats to ensure accessibility; if specific software is required to which some learners may not have access, alternative file types are not provided; large files are not identified as such and alternative (smaller) files are not provided; video files are not streamed; graphics are not optimized for web delivery and may require extensive scrolling;

Links to some institutional policies, materials, and forms relevant for learner success (for example, plagiarism policies) are included but are difficult to find; course/instructor policies regarding decorum, behavior, and netiquette are included but are not clearly written or would benefit from more detail; a few links to institutional services such as the library, writing center, or financial aid office may be included but require searching to find;

Promising

Learners do not have the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design or course content; feedback mechanisms do not guarantee privacy to the student;

Supportive mechanisms allow somelearners with disabilities to participate in the online community for some activities; the design and delivery of content do not apply alternative resources nor enable assistive processes for those needing accommodations; links to institutional policies, contacts, and procedures to support learners with disabilities are not evident; design factors such as color, text size manipulation, audio and video controls, and alt tags have not been considered;

Course materials sometimes use standard formats to ensure accessibility; if specific software is required to access course materials, no mention of this is included and alternative file types are not provided; large files are not identified as such and alternative (smaller) files are not provided; video files are not streamed; graphic files are not optimized for web delivery and require extensive scrolling;

Links to some institutional policies, materials, and forms relevant for learner success (for example, plagiarism policies) are not included; some course/instructor policies regarding decorum, behavior, and netiquette may be included but are not clearly written or would benefit from more detail; links to institutional services such as the library, writing center, or financial aid office are not included;

Incomplete