Argument in Science Agenda: Define scientific argument. Study the structure of argument. Research an...

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Transcript of Argument in Science Agenda: Define scientific argument. Study the structure of argument. Research an...

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Slide 2 Argument in Science Slide 3 Agenda: Define scientific argument. Study the structure of argument. Research an argument. Craft an argument. Publish an argument. Slide 4 Teachers can facilitate an environment that encourages the use of argument in the classroom to the level of rigor expected by the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Framework. Teachers can articulate the framework of an argument. Teachers can implement and facilitate argumentation in the science classroom. Outcomes: Slide 5 College and Career Readiness Standard 1: Read Closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Common Core Reading Standards Slide 6 Common Core Writing Standards WHST.1 1.Write arguments focused on discipline- specific content. Slide 7 Ive already told you. No you didnt! Yes I did! Slide 8 What is Scientific Argument? A logical description of a scientific idea and the evidence for or against it. In everyday language, an argument usually means a verbal disagreement, but here we use another meaning of the term: a reasoned case for or against a particular viewpoint. Scientific arguments generally have a few basic components: What is the idea? If this idea were true, what would we expect to observe in a given situation? Is this expectation borne out? How does that reflect on the likelihood that the idea is accurate or inaccurate? -Understanding Science, 2012 Slide 9 Modified Model Template Figure 2. Taken from Berland & McNeill (2010) citing McNeill, K. L. & Krajcik, J.(2012) because Grades 6-8 Grades 9-12 Slide 10 Argument Learning Progressions What are some behaviors one should see when doing an argument? What conversations should students have during an argument? Figure taken from Berkland & McNeill, 2010 Used with permission. Slide 11 Quick Write What are some key concepts students should practice when engaged argumentative writing? Slide 12 Researching an Argument Background Knowledge- Read 2 Handouts- select pages Generating Arguments about Climate Change (pp. 26-32) Generating an Argument (pp. 32-36) Collecting Research Data Reading Various Texts Claim: Humans are a contributor to global warming. Slide 13 An experiment for data collection: Claim: Humans are a contributor to global warming. Conduct CO2 experiment Slide 14 Generating (Crafting) an Argument Which position do you take regarding the claim? Claim: Humans are a contributor to global warming. What is (are) your Claim(s)? What is your Evidence? What is your Reasoning? Slide 15 Conducting an Argument in a Semi-Debate Berland and McNeill (2010) have identified four specific factors that are key to the argumentative process: 1.individuals stating and defending claims, 2.individuals questioning one anothers claims and defense, 3.individuals evaluating one anothers claims and defense, and 4.individuals revising their own and others claims. P.776 Slide 16 Publishing an Argument Students should write their argument, according to CCSS expectations (WHST, p.64) Publishing - paper version or an on-line version What does that process look like in a classroom? Slide 17 Publishing Arguments Web 2.0 Sources Apps Glogster Blogger Edmodo Gaggle Arkansas Sandbox Edmodo Evernote Dragon Dictation Slide 18 Creating an Argumentation Routine Creating an Argumentation Routine Identify a Question Slide 19 Argument Learning Progressions What are some behaviors one should see when doing an argument? What conversations should students have during an argument? Figure taken from Berkland & McNeill, 2010 Used with permission. Slide 20 Reflection Which skills for argumentation will pose the greatest challenge for my students? Which topics in my content lend to engaging students to use argument? How confident am I in my ability to teach my students to engage in argumentative writing? In which areas might I ask for additional training? Adapted from the Consortium on Reaching Excellence in Education, Inc.