AP English Literature & Composition 2020-21 Summer Reading ... · PDF file AP English...

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Transcript of AP English Literature & Composition 2020-21 Summer Reading ... · PDF file AP English...

  • AP English Literature & Composition 2020-21 Summer Reading & Thinking Assignment

    Mrs. Noelle Bonds (room 413) email: [email protected]

    These assignments are required and will be entered in the gradebook as the first two grades of the semester. Those who do not complete or only partially complete the assignment are at risk of being removed from the course and will be at a disadvantage when we close read, discuss, and write about the novel the first week of class. Other than a dictionary, do not reference online sources while completing your work, unless specifically noted on the assignment. This should be about your unique engagement with the book, not someone else’s thoughts or work. Questioning and struggling causes your brain to grow. If you’re truly having trouble understanding what we read in class, we will tackle it together in class. Assignment #1: Read & Annotate The Great Gatsby AP Literature and Composition: This summer, you will be engaging with the following text: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. To have a running conversation with the text as you read (and to prove to me you read it and thoughtfully engaged with it), you are required to annotate as you read. Always read with a pen or pencil in your hand. Option 1: Annotate the pages. Write in the margins, use highlighters. However, don’t just highlight -- you need to include why you highlighted that section of the text. Option 2: Attach sticky notes to the pages, if you are reading in a copy of the novel that you are not allowed to write in. This will help you stop along the way and think about what you are reading and what it has to say to you and the world. Then, write about what you are thinking. Writing about what you are thinking is a crucial component to higher level thinking and reading for deeper understanding. Suggested things to think about and annotate for:

     Characterization of Gatsby and Daisy

     Figurative language like imagery, symbolism, simile, and metaphor

     Motif of weather, color, and time

     Themes of truth vs lies, love and hope, and the American Dream/Lost Generation You must turn in the annotated book at the beginning of class on the first day of class.

    mailto:[email protected]

  • Assignment #2: Major Works Data Sheet for The Great Gatsby AP Literature and Composition: This summer, you will be using the “Major Works Data Sheet” to respond to the story in writing. This is only the beginning – a very basic response to the basics of a narrative. Your culminating written response will be in the form of an in-class essay the first week of class. You must turn in your completed “Major Works Data Sheet” at the beginning of class on the first day of class. Class supply list: Required: White 3-ring 3” binder with 5-tab dividers Pencils Multicolor highlighters or colored pens for annotating

    Optional: Lined paper spiral, or composition book for notes Sticky notes, index cards, student planner

  • Name: Period: 1 2 3 4 5 6

    Major Works Data Sheet Advanced Placement Literature and Composition

    Title: The Great Gatsby

    Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Date of Publication: 1925

    Genre: Lost Generation Fiction

    Characteristics of the Genre (may use online source):

    Biographical Information about the Author (may use online source):

    Setting:

    Significance of Opening Scene:

    Explain the Function of Flashback in the narrative :

    Significance of Ending or Closing Scene:

  • Character

    Name Appearance, personality, values, background

    Perspective, Motives

    Nick Carraway

    Jay Gatsby

    Daisy Buchanan

    Tom Buchanan

    Name Role in Story Identify if the character is dynamic or static and explain

    Nick

    Jay

    Daisy

    Tom

  • Significant Quotes (use bookmark)

    Quotes:

    Analysis (not simply restating quote, no plot):

    Possible Themes: What about what it’s about? 1. A statement, no one word 2. Universal, extends beyond this story