AND FALL BEHIND TENANTS PACK IN AS JOBS DRY UP, ... 2021/02/06  · Dave Grohl and Foo...

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Transcript of AND FALL BEHIND TENANTS PACK IN AS JOBS DRY UP, ... 2021/02/06  · Dave Grohl and Foo...

  • C M Y K Nxxx,2021-02-07,A,001,Bs-4C,E2

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    The United States remains the most advanced cyber superpower on earth, but the hard truth is that it is also the world’s most targeted country. And hackers are exploiting its hubris. PAGE 1

    SUNDAY BUSINESS

    America the Vulnerable Squabbling among brothers and sisters is to be expected, experts say. Parents, here are some suggestions for limiting the screaming matches. PAGE 6

    AT HOME

    Soothe the Savage Siblings As the walls of the ancient Iraqi city continue to crumble, preservationists are racing to save its past. PAGE 9

    INTERNATIONAL 9-12

    Babylon’s Battle Against Time

    Dave Grohl and Foo Fighters are called upon whenever energetic music with joy and gravitas is required. PAGE 6

    ARTS & LEISURE

    Masters of Rock, and Catharsis President Biden wants the vice presi- dent, Kamala Harris, to have a major role. But for now he does not intend to assign her a specific portfolio. PAGE 13

    NATIONAL 13-22

    Harris, Front and Center Dolly Parton’s working women’s an- them has been reframed for a website builder’s Super Bowl ad. Working “5 to 9” — song of the side hustle. PAGE 1

    ‘9 to 5’ for the Gig Economy

    Mandy Patinkin and Kathryn Grody’s pandemic-era posts led to unlikely social media stardom. PAGE 5

    A Marriage Thriving Online

    The shorter, colder days can be a downer, but some people experience serious seasonal depression. PAGE 4

    More Than the Winter Blues

    The pandemic has pushed many wom- en with families to the brink. They’re tired and want someone to listen.

    SPECIAL SECTION

    Who Comforts the Mothers?

    Widespread poverty is helping to fuel an illegal market for vital organs, a portal to new misery for Afghanistan’s most vulnerable. PAGE 11

    Kidney Trade Preys on Afghans

    Star players have criticized the league’s handling of the pandemic, especially plans for the All-Star Game. PAGE 29

    SPORTS 26-29

    Boos in the N.B.A. Over Safety

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    –20%

    Smaller drop Bigger drop

    Lower Higher

    –40% –60% –80%

    Percent drop in average new cases from winter peak

    Half 1x 2x 3x

    Average daily new cases compared with previous peak

    U.S. Coronavirus Cases Are Down but Eclipse Spring and Summer Peaks New coronavirus cases are down 50 percent since the highest peak, on Jan. 8. But

    some parts of the country are still reporting new cases at a rate higher than during the worst peak they experienced before Oct. 1 last year. Article and chart, Page 7.

    Note: Changes are based on 7-day rolling average of daily cases.

    Source: New York Times database of reports from state and local health agencies. | Note: All change figures use 7-day rolling averages. Winter peak is the highest daily case average in each county after Oct. 1. Previous peak is the highest daily case average in each county before Oct. 1. Some parts of the country peaked in the spring, summer or both. THE NEW YORK TIMES

    At first, the offer seemed gener- ous. Erica Sklar was in a homeless shelter and needed a more stable place to live. Victor Rivera, who oversaw a network of shelters, in- cluding the one where she was staying, said he had a solution: a spare apartment for her at his home in the Bronx.

    But after Ms. Sklar moved in, she said, she realized that Mr. Ri- vera, whose nonprofit organiza- tion is one of the largest operators of homeless shelters in New York, had other intentions. In Decem- ber 2016, he asked to see a leaking ceiling in her bedroom, then turned off the lights, pushed her against a wall and began fondling her, according to Ms. Sklar and two friends in whom she confided.

    He demanded she give him oral sex, suggesting he would evict her if she refused, she said. Desperate to hold on to her apartment, she complied.

    Ms. Sklar is one of 10 women who said they had endured as- sault or unwanted sexual atten- tion from Mr. Rivera, The New

    York Times found. Even as some women have sounded warnings about Mr. Rivera — including two who were given payments by his organization that ensured their si- lence — his power and influence have only grown during New York’s worst homeless crisis in decades.

    His organization, the Bronx Parent Housing Network, has re- ceived more than $274 million from the city to run homeless shel- ters and provide services just since 2017. The pandemic has in- tensified Mr. Rivera’s importance: As the coronavirus swept through the homeless population, the city gave his group $10 million to pro- vide rooms where infected people could isolate and recover.

    Women reported Mr. Rivera’s behavior to a state agency, a city hotline and, in one instance, the police. But he maintained his perch atop the organization.

    One employee of the Bronx Par- ent Housing Network said that Mr. Rivera, the chief executive, forced her to give him oral sex in 2016 and then fired her, according to police records, interviews and other documents. In 2018, another employee accused Mr. Rivera of groping her and whispering sexu- al comments in her ear. After both women separately complained to a state human rights agency, the Bronx Parent Housing Network paid them a total of $175,000 in set- tlements that prohibited them from speaking publicly about their allegations, according to in- terviews and records reviewed by The Times.

    Five of the women were living in Mr. Rivera’s homeless shelters, or had recently left, when Mr. Ri- vera approached them for sex, they said.

    Bronx Shelters’ Boss Rose Despite Claims of Abuse

    City Gave $274 Million to Nonprofit Led by Man Accused of Sexual Predation

    By AMY JULIA HARRIS

    Victor Rivera at the Bronx Parent Housing Network.

    JASON COHEN/BRONX TIMES

    Continued on Page 18

    Football fans know what old quarterbacks look like as they fade away. It is not like Tom Brady.

    Old quarterbacks hobble around the field, propped on stiff hips and achy knees, their arms ragged and their faces craggy. They look like survivors, elevated in myth but diminished in stature.

    Vaults and minds are filled with clips of Johnny Unitas, Joe Na- math, Brett Favre and all the other creaky quarterbacks who tempted the fates of time and tra- dition, shunning retirement until deep — maybe too deep — into Hall-of-Fame careers.

    When John Elway played his

    last game, winning a Super Bowl, he was 38. Peyton Manning did the same at 39. Rigid and worn, older quarterbacks usually move as if they might be unable to tie the laces on their cleats.

    Then there is Brady, a cyborg. He is 43. Does he have a wrinkle on his face? Is his arm bionic? Are his joints made of rubber? He probably can tie his own laces while doing downward dog.

    “You look at this guy and think, ‘Wow, it’s absolutely incredible,” said Gordon Lithgow, a professor and vice president of the Buck In- stitute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif. “Is he actually aging at a slower rate than other peo- ple?”

    That is the question football fans are asking ahead of Sunday’s Super Bowl LV between Brady’s Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs.

    The answer appears to be yes, at least in football terms. The hard question is why.

    “There’s no way that elite ath- letes are immune to aging,” Lith- gow said. “You can see quite a pre- cipitous drop-off in performance — even though they are way above average, it’s still happening at the same rates.”

    Brady, who is in his first season with Tampa Bay after 20 years with the New England Patriots, will be the oldest player to partici-

    A Super Bowl Sideshow: See the Ageless Man! By JOHN BRANCH

    Tampa Bay’s Tom Brady, 43, is the only quarterback to start a Super Bowl after age 40. He is about to do it for the third time.

    MARK LOMOGLIO/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Continued on Page 28

    The red balloons rose over an anxious city. They floated by the hundreds above the golden spire of Sule Pagoda in Yangon, the commercial capital of Myanmar, and drifted over an avenue where, more than a dozen years ago, sol- diers shot citizens marching peacefully for democracy.

    The balloons hovering over Yangon were released by activ- ists, expressing their hope that the elected leaders detained in a military coup d’état would be free again. The color — later pink, after red balloons sold out — symbol- ized the National League for De- mocracy party, which ha