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  • RFA RENEWABLE FUELSASSOCIATION

    AN AMERICAN SUCCESS STORY ETHANOL INDUSTRY DRIVES INNOVATION AND CREATES JOBS COAST-TO-COAST

    How the

  • AN AMERICAN SUCCESS STORY

    How the

    For all the inspiring examples in this book, there are many more

    an employee or a small business person with an ethanol story to a restaurant, coffee shop or

    equipment shop that does a lot of business with a nearby ethanol plant, a veteran who has returned from

    oil, tell us. Write us at SuccessStories@EthanolRFA.org. Or submit your stories and pictures at ChooseEthanol.com. We may feature your story and photos in our next edition, on this website, or in a video.

    WE WANT TO TELL YOUR STORY

  • E T

    H A

    N O

    L

    -

    with them at a local business b reakfast.

    jobs all across this country, esp ecially in communities in rural

    America that are in

    need of revitalization. Last yea r, the production and use of an

    estimated 13 billion ,

    according to an analysis by the respected economist John Urb

    anchuk. With over 200

    , more than

    in producing ethanol or providing goods and services to ethanol prod

    ucers. Mean-

    while, American ethanol suppo rts hundreds of thousands mor

    e jobs, from the compa-

    nies that service the suppliers to businesses of all kinds on th

    e Main Streets where the

    Thanks to the ethanol industry , there are new opportunities f

    or young people from

    rural America to earn their liv ings and build their lives close

    to their families and

    friends. The ethanol industry o ffers high-skill, high-wage jobs

    with promising futures.

    As Magazine found in a survey of ethanol in

    dustry employees last

    year, 73 percent have either a two- year or four-year college degree, 8

    3 percent earn

    – well above the national avera ge of 71 percent with

    -

    troduces many of the men and women who are working to ma

    ke America more secure,

    more economically stable, and environmentally sustainable…

    making an America that

    and ingenuity and be encourag ed by the stories of their succe

    ss, born of big ideas and

    elbow grease.

    achievements of American eth anol. As this scrapbook shows,

    the industry is expand-

    ing well beyond the Corn Belt a nd making use of new technolo

    gies and new feedstocks.

    Ethanol is an American success st ory. Together, we will write the next

    chapters.

    Sincerely,

    Bob Dinneen

    1

    February 2011

  • Ray Defenbaugh story. By day, Ray is the president, CEO and chairman of the Board of Big River Resources

    -tors employing over 200 people. He is the president of a co-op that includes -

    What makes Ray unusual and what drives his passion to farm is the fact that his family has farmed in America on a continuing basis since 1710

    -

    etc. Grow the grain and feed it to livestock and walk that value off. With changes

    that ethanol is a value-added project, and that instead of converting grain to milk, Be-

    did 300 years ago. Ethanol is giving my sons and daughters and future genera-

    ETHANOL KEEPS A 300-YEAR FAMILY TRADITION ALIVE

    2

    RAY DEFENBAUGH

    CREA TEDJOB S200

  • J O

    B S

    3

    COSKATA BIOFUEL LOAN GUARANTEE TO GENERATE JOBS IN ALABAMA

    - nol with an innovative technology that “uses a plasma torch, which shoots 8,000-degree jets of air at twice the speed of sound, to blast wood chips into hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Those gases are pumped into a tank of bacteria

    largest so far for a biofuels plant, to help fund the construction of a 55 million-gallon-a-year production facility in Greene County, Alabama. According to the 300 construc- at the plant and in harvesting and haul-

    ing pulpwood and biomass needed to make ethanol. Following the announcement, Alabama Governor Robert Bentley commented that this new project would help

    Wes Bolsen

    -over agricultural waste or trash, and convert that directly into a fuel which

    CREATED

    JOBS

    1,000

    “hundreds of

    and economic

    development in

    an area where

    they are sorely

  • C O - P R O D U C T S PRODUCING DRY ICE FOR HA

    MBURGERS – AND HOSPITAL S

    Located in corn country, Commonwealth Ag

    ri-En-

    ergy boosts the local economy by c onverting its exhaust into a v

    ersatile

    co-product: dry ice.

    dioxide. Commonwealth Agri -Energy captures and sells th

    e raw gas to -

    tian County, Ky.

    Since the late 1980s, food pro cessors have thrown chicken

    , pork, beef or lamb

    on dry ice, controlling the tem perature and cooling the mea

    t in one day, instead of

    germs out.

    where it helps to freeze the v eins to reduce bleeding.

    By producing biofuels, livesto ck feed and dry ice and provi

    ding a market for corn,

    Commonwealth Agri-Energy and its 30 employees anchor wha

    t general manager

    Now the plant is working to fu rther reduce its energy usage

    . By launch-

    ing a water-cooling project to cut its electrical consumption by

    5 percent. -

    ect, adjusting its power dema nds during the winter and su

    mmer in response

    to patterns of usage

    throughout the system.

    A rural Kentucky

    make ethanol... it helps save lives and enhance food by capturing CO2.

    4

    CREA TEDJOB S30

  • C O - P R O D U C T SIT’S NOT JUST ETHANOL THAT MAKES ETHANOL STRONG Unlike many in the ethanol industry who were either grain farmers or

    engineers or businessmen, Walt Wendland started in animal husbandry with a degree in animal science. He was raised on a dairy farm, started farming in 1974, and has been involved in beef production, managed an 800-cow dairy

    ethanol industry has been his calling. Today, Walt is the president and CEO of Golden Grain Energy in Mason

    and ethanol production because of the value dried distiller grains (DDGs) could

    Dried distillers grain, a co-prod- One-third of every

    bushel of corn used in the production of ethanol is returned to the market in the

    DDGs and gluten feed from Cedar Rapids to his farm. By building an “ethanol

    Owned by more than 2,100 members, the majority of whom are north-

    are committed to being strong partners in the local communities, key

    With both plants producing well over 100 million gallons of ethanol a year, Walt points out that “in pretty tough economic times, this is exactly what

    5

    tough economic

    times, this is exactly what

    to keep the economy

    L to R: Dale Kleis s, Doug and Lisa

    Kleiss, Hadwen an d

    Louann Kleiss, W alt Wendland and

    Judy Kleiss

    CREATED

    JOBS 86

  • J O B S

    BIOFUELS BOOST NORTH CAROLINA’S ECONOMY North Carolina joined the ethanol boom in 2010 when Clean Burn Fuels began grinding

    the heart of the state’s hog and poultry belt. The plant is the largest on the East Coast, with production capacity of 60 million gallons a year and 50 employees.

    “Clean

    - anol and feed goes 120-mile radius.

    A North Carolina company, Clean Burn is working in partnership with two other

    supplying grain, is helping to market dry distillers grains to hog and poultry produc- ers as well as pro