Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky...

of 17 /17
1 Ambassador Evaluation SeatoSky Corridor June – October 2008 ATTN: Mayor Greg Gardner and Squamish Council Prepared by Brooke Carere [email protected] 604.815.5096

Transcript of Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky...

Page 1: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ambassador Evaluation

Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor 

June – October 2008 

 

 

 

 

ATTN: Mayor Greg Gardner and Squamish Council 

 

 

Prepared by Brooke Carere 

[email protected] 

604.815.5096 

 

 

 

Page 2: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

2

 

 

Table of Contents  TUBACKGROUND INFORMATIONUT ...................................................................................3  TUPUBLIC EDUCATION AND AWARENESSUT......................................................................3 

TUFigure 1:  Idling Hotspots and InterventionsUT ..........................................................5 TUFigure 2 – Events Attended: Including audience number and profile UT ...................5 TUDiscussionUT ...............................................................................................................6 

TUSURVEY ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION UT .........................................................................8 

TUChart 1 ‐ Community concerns to local air qualityUT.................................................9 TUChart 2 ‐ Community Air Quality Ratings UT ...............................................................9 TUChart 3 – Squamish Air Pollution SourcesUT ............................................................10 TUChart 4 – Vehicle Idling contribution to Air PollutionUT ........................................11 TUChart 5 – Vehicle Idling and Human HealthUT ........................................................11 TUChart 6 – Personal action on climate changeUT.......................................................12 TUChart 7 – Reasons Individuals Idle their Vehicles UT.................................................13 

TUSUSTAINABILITY – BASELINE DATA OBESERVATIONS UT..............................................14 

TUFigure 3 – Idling Hotspot Observations and ChangesUT ..........................................14 TUIdle Free SignageUT...................................................................................................16 

TUCONCLUSIONUT ............................................................................................................17   

 

 

 

 

“Young people are excited and enthusiastic about the chance to be

ambassadors for our climate’s future”

T~ TPremier Gordon Campbell

Page 3: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

3

Idle Free BC Ambassadors

BACKGROUND INFORMATION    

The Youth Climate Leadership Alliance (YCLA) was formed in March 2008 to engage and 

encourage youth in B.C. to take climate action and offer career opportunities in the BC public 

Service.  Increasing British Columbians’ awareness and understanding of climate action 

activities is a major goal of the Alliance, and working with local governments is fundamental to 

the success of the YCLA objectives.   Furthermore, the YCLA plays a key role in helping achieve 

the provinces goal to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 2007 levels by 33 

percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050.  The first order of business for the Alliance was an on‐

the‐ground campaign to combat GHG emissions from idling vehicles. 

Idle Free BC ambassadors hit the 

streets this past summer in nine regions 

throughout the province to promote the 

reduction of unnecessary vehicle idling. The 

transportation sector accounts for nearly 50% 

of Canada’s GHG emissions (Natural 

Resources of Canada).  Likewise, vehicle 

based transportation emissions are one the 

most significant factors affecting air quality in the Sea‐to‐Sky corridor, and the Idle Free 

campaign aimed to combat some of these emissions with a decrease in vehicle idling.  Over the 

course of the summer, I attended several local events, composed articles for local newsletters 

and papers, ran ads on radio stations and movie theatres, surveyed visitors and local residents, 

and obtained data on identified idling hotspots.  What follows is a brief evaluation of the Sea‐

to‐Sky Idle Free BC summer 2008 campaign. 

 

PUBLIC EDUCATION AND AWARENESS    

  Vehicle idling is a behaviour that most drivers fail to recognize.  The best way to change 

any behaviour is to educate and inform people of the negative effects of such actions and 

This is me... the Sea‐to‐Sky ambassador. 

Page 4: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

4

provide incentives to change.  Throughout the summer I attended various events and meetings 

to help expose common idling myths and inform the public of the benefits of reducing their 

unnecessary vehicle idling.  Such benefits include: improved local air quality, decrease of green 

house gas emissions, reduction is vehicle maintenance and increase fuel cost savings.  I spent 

numerous hours touring the Sea‐to‐Sky corridor and hitting the streets of each community to 

increase public awareness and support.   

   

A brief summary of the outcome of my outreach can be seen below.  Figure 1 is a record 

of identified idling hotspots, the number of face‐to‐face interventions regarding idling 

behaviour and the overall outcome of the meeting in terms of a success/failure rating.  Figure 2 

is a record of various events, presentations and festivals attended in the Sea‐to‐Sky corridor 

over the course of the summer.  Number of participants refers to the number of individuals that 

were engaged in idle reduction outreach.  A key explaining the audience profile percentages in 

given above the chart. 

 

Page 5: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

5

Figure 1:  Idling Hotspots and Interventions 

 

Date  Location Number of 

Interventions 

Successes/ 

Failures 

June 12 Whistler Market Place 20 18/2

July 18 & Aug 8

Downtown Squamish (Cleveland Ave)

35 29/6 

July 10/15 Whistler day lots 40 32/8 

July 10 Meadow Park Sports centre – Whislter

20 20/0 

July 10 Nester’s Parking Lot 12 11/1 

July 20 Nester’s recylcing centre

8 8/0 

July 18 Squamish Cold Beer and wine store

(Highlands)

10 7/3 

July 17 & Aug 23

Bowen Island Ferry line-up

30 27/3 

July 17 & Aug 25 Langdale ferry line-up 28 26/2 

 

Figure 2 – Events Attended: Including audience number and profile 

 

An estimated profile of participants at recorded events is given using the following 

coding and the corresponding percentage: 

Age: Opinion: A) Less then 20 Years old i) Supportive

B) Between 20 - 40 Years old ii) Persuadable C) 40 - 60 Years old iii) Apathetic D) 60 years plus iv) Opposed

Event  Activity Number of 

Participants 

Audience 

Profile (%)* 

Squamish Farmer’s Marker (3 days)

Info booth 65 B-80 C-18 D-2 i)-80 ii)-16 iii)-4

Page 6: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

6

Whistler Farmer’s Maket (4 days)

Info booth 150 A-5 B-60 C-30 D-5

i)-87 ii)-12 iv)-1

Squamish Library Presentation 12 A-75 B-25 i)-25 ii)-75

Logger's sports Info booth 45 A-5 B-70 C-20 D-5

i)-70 ii)-24 iii)=5 iv)-1

Bowfest Info booth 30 A-7 B-43 C-43 D-7

i)-90 ii)-10

AWARE enviro group

Presentation 15 B-15 i)-15

Sea-to-Sky Air quality meeting

Presentation 21 B-60 C-40 i)-100

Canda Day Parade (Whistler)

Roving talking/outreach

130 A-40 B-30 C-25 D-5

i)40 ii)50 iii)10

Pemberton Festival Roving talking/ outreach

4500 A-35 B-55 C-10 i)-47 ii)-40 iii)-

10 iv)-3

 

 

Discussion    

Approaching strangers in their cars can be an awkward situation regardless of the 

message you hope to deliver.  I found it essential to approach with a smile, explain who you 

are, what you are doing, and respect their personal space.  Additionally, I found people were 

more willing to talk if I was wearing some form of branded uniform (i.e. Idle Free bag, jacket, t‐

shirt).  Wearing a uniform helps to increase your legitimacy.   

   

It is important to realize that every intervention is unique and it is vital to ‘feel’ out 

individuals and use personal judgement on what message will get their attention. Know who 

your audience is and use examples that they can relate to.  For example, if there are children in 

Page 7: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

7

Idle Free BC Outreach Table

the car refer to air quality concerns and how young lungs are very sensitive to air pollution and 

exposure can result in health concerns such as asthma.  If the audience is a 30‐50 man driving a 

diesel truck, make reference to the increase vehicle maintenance that is required due to idling. 

   

Attending events within the Sea‐to‐Sky corridor was, in my opinion, the most useful tool 

to engage the public and get them thinking about their idling behaviour.  Farmer’s markets are 

a great place to connect with locals and gain public support.  In terms of the events attended 

this summer, Bowfest on Bowen Island and Whistler`s Canada Parade were the least effective.  

Bowfest was designed to entertain children 

and families and included face painting, blow 

up bouncy castles, an arts and crafts tent, 

tumbling mats and a dunk tank – just to name 

a few.  That being said it was hard to captivate 

attention over to the Idle Free BC outreach 

table.  Canada Day (in Whistler, BC) also had 

dozens of games, floats and mascots that 

engaged the crowd. All efforts to round up a 

walking Idle Free float came up short and I 

was a one woman show handing out key chains, lollipops, info cards and decals to the crowd.   

 

Constructive feedback aside, simply being present at events and having some sort of 

bold banner (i.e. Inspiring BC to be Idle Free) and signage will get the message out there.  At all 

events, I observed dozens of individuals who did not approach my table but they did notice the 

sign and it began a conversation regarding the initiative.  Future events could be improved by 

having some sort of game (spin a wheel, answer a question, win a prize) as well as by having 

more than one person to help with breaks and keep energy levels up. 

Page 8: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

8

 

SURVEY ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION    

 

 Over the course of the summer 150 people were surveyed throughout the Sea‐to‐Sky 

corridor.  The majority of the surveys were conducted face to face; however, some individuals 

preferred to fill out the survey by hand versus having a one on one conversation.  Surveys were 

conducted at local farmers markets and on the streets of Squamish and Whistler.  Additionally, 

permission from BC ferries was given in order to conduct surveys at the Bowen Island and 

Langdale (Gibson’s) Ferry terminals.  Please note that all the data from Bowen and Gibson’s was 

obtained at the ferry terminals.  It is also worth 

noting that the sample size of individuals 

representing Bowen and Gibson’s was quite small ‐ 

nine and eleven respectively.  While surveying at the 

ferry terminals and in Whistler, the majority of 

participants were from the lower mainland region. 

   

Survey results were isolated based on 

individual communities to have a rough over view of 

local opinions and behaviours.  The results from the 

community‐based analysis are shown below in Chart 

1, 2 and 3. A complete analysis of all 150 surveys was 

used to determine idling opinions (Chart 4 ‐6) and the 

major behavioural basis as to why individuals idle 

their vehicles (Chart 7).  What follows is a visual 

display of the findings along with a brief interpretation of the data. 

Page 9: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

9

Chart 1 ‐ Community concerns to local air quality 

    

   

A quick glance at Chart 1 and it is obvious that the majority of those surveyed strongly 

care about local air quality.  With that in mind, it seems fair to say that promoting the reduction 

of vehicle idling in order to increase local air quality, would be a widely accepted strategy. 

 

Chart 2 ‐ Community Air Quality Ratings 

 

Page 10: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

10

    Of those surveyed, it appears that local residents in Whistler and Bowen agree that their 

air quality is either excellent (63% and 89%, respectively) or good (37% and 11%).  It is 

interesting to note that although 60% of surveyed Gibson`s residents rated air quality as good, 

40% also indicated that air quality dropped to a poor rating during the winter and on windy 

days due to emissions from local industry and burning.  Squamish residents indicate a broad 

range of air quality rating opinions.  Residents in all communities were further surveyed to 

generate an understanding of the perceived major sources of air pollution.  For the purpose of 

this report only Squamish results are highlighted (Chart 3).  

Chart 3 – Squamish Air Pollution Sources 

 

   

Squamish residents identified vehicle emissions to be the major source of air pollution in 

their communities.  Second to vehicle emissions, are trucking/diesel emissions followed closely 

by road dust and sources related to the highway development.  These three factors are 

perceptibly correlated with each other and the time of year in which the survey was conducted.  

Results indicate that Squamish citizens are aware that vehicle based emissions are a major 

source of air pollution.  As such, strategies to further reduce vehicle emissions should continue 

to enhance local air quality and promote healthy environments. 

Page 11: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

11

 

 

Chart 4 – Vehicle Idling contribution to Air Pollution 

 

 

 

 

Chart 5 – Vehicle Idling and Human Health 

  

  The entire collection of surveys 

was used in generating Charts 4 – 7, 

representing Lower Mainland and Sea‐

to‐Sky residents.  Charts 4 – 7 display 

responses to opinion based questions 

designed to better understand 

individuals’ outlook regarding idling 

and climate change.  Chart 4 indicates 

that 97% of those surveyed 

acknowledge that vehicle idling 

contributes to air pollution.  

Additionally, Chart 5 illustrates that 

94% of the participants agree that 

vehicle idling is bad for human health.  

These high percentages are evidence 

that individuals are aware of air 

quality and health concerns associated 

with idling.  This is a big step in 

identifying the problem; however, the 

next challenge is to get individuals to 

recognize when and where they are 

committing acts of idling.  

Page 12: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

12

 

Chart 6 – Personal action on climate change 

    Once more, the results from all surveyed participants provides a very hopeful overview 

by illustrating that 80% agree that they are regularly taking personal action to minimize climate.  

The question leaves plenty of room for interpretation from the surveyed person perspective, 

and one persons concept of taking climate action may be very different from another’s.  

Personal perspective aside, the results displayed in Chart 6 indicate that B. C residents 

recognize that climate change is real, and they are taking steps – whatever they may be – to 

reduce their overall impact and minimize climate change. 

   

Although personal action on climate change is taking place, strategies to change idling 

behaviour needs to be continued.  Participants indicate the most effective strategies are:  

• Receiving educational material 

• Reminders such as stickers and signs  

• Anti‐idling bylaws and fines.   

Other suggested strategies include electric cars, automatic shut off when car stops moving, a 

change in traffic patterns, increase transit routes and find a non‐fossil fuel source to move 

vehicles.  A shift regarding the gasoline propelled car is taking place in B.C., Canada and 

worldwide.    Canadians are being forced to acknowledge that alternative fuel sources and 

Page 13: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

13

transportation methods need to be implemented in order to sustain life as we know it.  Further 

education and outreach is mandatory for this message to continue to spread. 

 

Chart 7 – Reasons Individuals Idle their Vehicles 

 

  The final chart (Chart 7), illustrates the most frequent responses in regards to why 

drivers may idle their vehicle.  Interestingly, 35% of those surveyed claim that they don’t idle, 

which is also the highest percentage in the chart.  Again, this indicates that individuals are 

aware of the fact that idling gets your nowhere.  More interesting are the reasons why people 

do idle.  Chart 7 shows that not waiting long, warming up, and comfort are the major idling 

reasons.  This information can be used to further target messages to idling drivers.  For 

example, promoting people to get a block heater to warm their cars up and to dress warmer, 

addresses two idling reasons. Additionally, educating drivers that it is 50% faster to warm your 

car up by driving it (Natural Resources of Canada), and less damage will be done on your engine 

block are other targeted messages Understanding the reasons behind the behaviour will aid in 

finding ways to change it. 

 

Page 14: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

14

 

SUSTAINABILITY – BASELINE DATA OBESERVATIONS  

  Over the course of the summer I observed and recorded time spent idling at various 

previously identified idling hotspots throughout the Sea‐to‐Sky corridor.  I went once at the 

beginning of the summer and once at the end of the summer.  During the time in between, I 

returned to the hot spots to do interventions and outreach.  Figure 3 represents the changes in 

idling frequency, duration, carbon dioxide emissions, fuel consumption and cost.  All idling hot 

spots showed a reduction in all of these categories.  Results illustrate that the Sea‐to‐Sky 

corridor is making small steps to becoming Idle Free.   

 

Figure 3 – Idling Hotspot Observations and Changes 

Savings Total Estimated Number

Reduction in frequency of idling: Whistler - Nester’s Recycle centre

Whistler - Nester’s Grocery parking lot Whistler - Taxi Loop

Whislter – Meadow Park Sports Centre Squamish Downtown Bowen Ferry Line-up

Langdale Ferry Line-up

(%) 16.67 7.619

40.132 30.303 3.421 0.547

12.681

Reduction in duration of idling: Whistler - Nester’s Recycle centre

Whistler - Nester’s Grocery parking lot Whistler - Taxi Loop

Whislter – Meadow Park Sports Centre Squamish Downtown Bowen Ferry Line-up

Langdale Ferry Line-up

(min) 1.717 0.262 1.089

0.0576 0.521 0.436 0.151

Page 15: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

15

Reduced CO2 emissions: Whistler - Nester’s Recycle centre

Whistler - Nester’s Grocery parking lot Whistler - Taxi Loop

Whislter – Meadow Park Sports Centre Squamish Downtown Bowen Ferry Line-up

Langdale Ferry Line-up

(kg/vehicle)

0.206 0.031 0.131 0.069 0.063 0.03 0.018

Fuel savings: Whistler - Nester’s Recycle centre

Whistler - Nester’s Grocery parking lot Whistler - Taxi Loop

Whislter – Meadow Park Sports Centre Squamish Downtown Bowen Ferry Line-up

Langdale Ferry Line-up

litres/vehicle

0.086 0.013 0.054 0.029 0.026 0.022 0.008

Cost savings: Whistler - Nester’s Recycle centre

Whistler - Nester’s Grocery parking lot Whistler - Taxi Loop

Whislter – Meadow Park Sports Centre Squamish Downtown Bowen Ferry Line-up

Langdale Ferry Line-up

$/vehicle 0.12 0.018 0.076 0.04 0.036 0.03 0.011

 

   

Other interesting observations were found at the Tim Horton’s drive thru in Squamish.  I 

observed an early morning coffee rush and in one hour recorded 254 minutes of idling (from 75 

cars).  That roughly equates to $0.25/car spent on fuel while waiting for a coffee – based on 3 

cylinder vehicle and gas prices at $1.20/litre (summer time cost).  In other words, if a driver got 

a coffee every morning before work (assuming a 5 day work week), they would have spent 

enough money in idling fuel consumption to get one free coffee.  Better yet, one year of getting 

Page 16: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

16

Example of Idle Free signs to be installed throughout the corridor.

coffee every work day in a drive thru line‐up will cost you roughly sixty dollars – not to mention 

the excess wear and tear on your vehicle. 

 

Idle Free Signage    

During the fall of 2008, I wrote a proposal for funding from the Sea‐to‐Sky Air Quality 

Management for Idle Free Signs for all corridor communities.  Funding was granted, and to date 

all communities (aside from Pemberton) have taken advantage the opportunity for Idle Free 

Signs.  Squamish will be receiving 25 signs in February 2009 to install throughout town.  Signs 

will be mounted at identified idling hot spots including: 

• Brennan Park Community Centre 

• Squamish Public Library 

• Downtown (Cleveland Ave) 

• Eagle’s Nest Grocery (Brakendale) 

• Alice Lake Provincial Park (parking lots) 

• Nexen Beach 

• School zone District owned right‐of‐ways 

• DOS office building 

• Squamish Adventure Centre 

 

The 12” x 8” sign available through funding can be 

seen above.  Additional room is available on the sign for by‐law information to be added.  

Currently, all communities in the Sea‐to‐Sky corridor have established an Anti‐idling bylaw 

except for Squamish.  I’m currently working on a Squamish suitable anti‐idling by‐law for 

councils review and hope to have it in effect by the summer of 2009. 

Page 17: Ambassador Evaluation Sea Sky Corridormedia.cbsm.com/comments/168012/Idle_Free_BC_Final_report... · 2009-10-06 · 1 Ambassador Evaluation Sea‐to‐Sky Corridor June – October

17

CONCLUSION    

Wrapping up the Idle Free BC campaign of 2008 appears to be a success.  I can 

confidently say that over eighty percent of people approached and surveyed this summer 

where 100% supportive of the program and publicly committed to spread the Idle Free message 

to friends and families.  The results obtained from the surveys are very optimistic; however, it is 

critical that more surveys be completed in order to increase the statistical relevancy.  Additional 

research should be put into the survey design to ensure that bias answers are minimized.  It 

becomes obvious early in the survey that it is focussed on air quality and climate change, and 

individuals may have felt social pressure to say the “right answer” as opposed to the honest 

answer.  Allowing individuals to fill in the survey on their own time may help to eliminate this 

predicament.  Continuing to run Idle Reduction programs in schools and through summer 

outreach programs will increase awareness of the benefits of reducing unnecessary vehicle 

idling. 

  Idling is a behaviour that the majority of offenders do not realize they are committing. 

Any outreach campaign, newsletters and presentations will increase public awareness 

regarding unnecessary idling.  The message is out there and spreading.  In fact, during some of 

my data collection, individuals who were idling in their cars would see me walking by with a 

clipboard in hand and then turn their engine off.  Obviously, some form of a behaviour change 

is occurring and individuals are aware of a negative social opinion regarding vehicle idling. 

  In conclusion, I have found the best way to spread the Idle Free message is by word of 

mouth.  That united with local signs, bylaws and educational information will help remind and 

encourage drivers to turn the key and be idle free.  Our current dependency on fossil fuel 

consumption cannot be sustained.  The time is now for all B.C. citizens to step up and take 

climate action – because we can’t idle forever. 

   

 

TT“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful people could change the

world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. –M. Mead TT