ACTION RESEARCH NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION PRESENTATION

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ACTION RESEARCH NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION PRESENTATION In fulfillment of graduate course work at Saint Catherine University – Saint Paul, MN Amanda Britt Hadsall Jakowich

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COMMUNICATION PRESENTATION
In fulfi llment of graduate course work at Saint Catherine University – Saint Paul, MN
Amanda Britt Hadsall Jakowich
To what extent will
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Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) - the ability to recognize and manage emotions, develop care and concern for others, make responsible decisions, establish healthy relationships, and effectively handle challenging situations (Dacey et al., 2016)
Socialization - the process beginning during childhood by which individuals acquire the values, habits, and attitudes of a society (Merriam-Webster, 2020)
SEL Interruptions –Experiences that negatively impact healthy social-emotional development Trauma
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)
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THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
NVC provides a backdrop and set of skills to address human issues, from the most personal relationships to global disputes (Rosenberg, 2003). 
WHY – NVC?
*build self-confidence in support of social-
emotional learning
Classroom Management
Student Conflict
Student Redirection
The NVC model is built on four components
Observations – the concrete actions we observe that affect our well-being
Feelings – how we feel in relation to what we observe Needs – the needs, values, desires, etc. that create our
feelings Requests – the concrete actions we request in order to
enrich our lives
Rosenberg, M. (2015)
State the emotion related to the met or unmet need
Need Request
Rosenberg, M. (2015)
Physical and emotional development flourishes in an environment that maintains healthy connections between caring adults and children (Dacey
et al., 2016)
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Equipping young children with vocabulary to articulate thoughts and feelings strengthens their ability to handle challenging social situations
Physical and emotional development flourishes in an environment that maintains healthy connections between caring adults and children
Responsible decision-making in the classroom environment is key to mutual respect and ethical actions that focus on the safety of oneself and others.
Research suggests that behaviors and attitudes toward peers who appear the same or different are constructed views that are socially derived In culturally responsive classrooms, students learn to understand and value differences, appreciate diversity, and respect others
(Dacey et al., 2016; Darling-Churchill & Lippman, 2016; Day & Allvin, 2016; Kidron, 2019; Pickett, 2018; Seigel, 2012; Simmons, 2019)
Interruptions in Social-Emotional Learning
To assist children in building up self-regulatory skills, adults must focus on specific strategies and interventions that support SEL while also proactively understanding the frequency and the varying types of trauma they have experienced
Results suggested that students with exposure to three or more ACEs significantly increased the likelihood of social delays and were nearly two and a half times more likely to have aggressive tendencies. ACEs in this research example negatively impact the child’s need to develop healthy social awareness skills.
Participation in early learning programs can assist in early detection and interventions for children experiencing trauma.
(Campbell et al., 2016; Dacey et al., 2016; Darling-Churchill & Lippman, 2016; Liming & Grube, 2018; Seigel, 2012)
METHODOLOGY
By presenting lessons in NVC, students will feel empowered to express their feelings and needs in a variety of situations
HOW – NVC?
* Present NVC by engaging students in Grace and Courtesy lessons
*Observe interaction between students
*Role model compassionate language
*Provide supportive guidance to engage students in exploring their emotions
Engagement
Observe
Need Request
something you would like to share.”
because I need to hear what you
have to say.
Feeling
“I feel frustrated when I see the cylinder block rolling on the floor…
Need Request
Please pick up the cylinder, place back into the block, and put the
block away so it is ready for a friend.”
because I need for our classroom materials to be
put back safely - when not in use –
ready for the next person.
Researcher-Supported NVC Between Two Students
Feeling
“I feel really angry that you took the pine bough from my hands because I was still playing with it.
Need Request
Please hand me back the pine bough. When I
am done, I will hand it to you, and you can have a
turn.”
I need you to ask me if I am done playing with it.
OTHER COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES
Positive affirmations • “I am safe. I am loved. I am kind.”
Love and Logic technique (2006)
• “I would be happy to show you how to carry your work carefully.”
First-then statements • “First wash your hands then have lunch.”
Cline & Fay, 2006
throughout the research
Independent Communication Findings
OBSERVATIONS & REFLECTIONS
• Students displayed curiosity in learning and describing emotions of self and others
• Students progressed through different levels of social understanding and learned how to relate to others in a new way
ACTION PLAN
When we mirror NVC, all we can see are the feelings and needs of those communicating with us: “We see what’s in their heart” (Rosenberg, 2005, p.
6).
• When supported by the researcher, students displayed an enhanced positive attitude towards themselves when addressing conflict in peer-peer interaction
• Social cohesion (connections that bring people together in a given society) was impacted by empathetically and compassionately interacting with one another
NVC & SOCIALIZATION
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*Communicative competence – the ability to understand and use language effectively to communicate in authentic social and school environments
*Family dynamics and family culture in addressing conflicts for some students differed from lessons given
*Socio-linguistic challenges in emotional language descriptions
*Honestly expressing other methods of peaceful conflict resolution at no one else’s expense
KEY TAKE-AWAY Researcher Availability Bias
• Previous classroom experience
Best Next Steps Next Steps
*Provide more opportunities for peaceful resolutions (e.g. create peace table for discussions)
*Role-model compassionate communication
*Support self-expression by providing an environment rich in spoken-language to describe feelings and needs
References
Dacey, John S., et al. (2016). Your Child’s Social and Emotional Well- Being: A Complete Guide for Parents and Those Who Help Them. John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated.
Cline, F. & Fay, J. (2006). Parenting with Love and Logic: Teaching Children Responsibly. Navigation Press. Colorado Springs, Colorado.
Montessori, M. (1992). Education and Peace. The Clio Montessori Series Vol. 10. Clio Press. Oxford, England
Rosenberg, M. (2015). Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life. Puddle Dancer Press. Encinitas, California.   Rosenberg, M. (2003). Life-Enriching Education. Puddle Dancer Press. Encinitas, California.   Rosenberg, M. (2005). Compassionate Classroom. Puddle Dancer Press. Encinitas, California.   Siegel, Daniel. (2012). The Developing Mind: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are. The Guilford Press. New York, NY
Q & A ARE THERE ANY QUESTIONS?
CLARIFICATIONS? COMMENTS?
Slide 1
Slide 2
Nonviolent Communication
Literature Review
Slide 9
Slide 18
Data analysis