A Sailwing Windmill

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Transcript of A Sailwing Windmill

A project

ATby:

MICROFICHE REFERENCE LIBRARYin Asia

of Volunteers

. . Gaudwon VzJ,.lage SW William W. Smith III

.

. Wm

.

Published by: Volunteers in Technical Assistance 1815 North Lynn Street Suite 200 P.O. Box 12438 Arlington, VA 22209 USA Paper copies are $ 595. Available from: Volunteers in Technical Assistance 1815 North Lynn Street Suite 200 P.O. Box 12438 Arlington, VA 22209 USA Reproduced by permission Technical Assistance. of Volunteers in

Reproduction of this microfiche document in any to the same restrictions as those form is subject of the original document.

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THE GAUDGAON WLLAGE SAILWING WINDMILLBy William W. Smith III

,AuPqAON

The Gaudgaon Sailwing

Villago

WindmillbY

William Illustrated Blueprints

W, Smith III by Bruce Tow1 by William Gensel

published

by

VOLUNTfZ~RS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, INC. IN 1815 North Lynn Street, Suite 200 Virginia 22209-2079 USA Arlington,

This publication is one of a series issued by VITA to document the activities of its worldwide *newable Energy Program.

ISBN O-86619-165-8

c 0

flbluntcets

in Tlechnical

Assistance,

Inc.

1982

TABLE OF CONTENTSI. II. .. ABOUT THIS HANDBOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*............... ............................................ INTRODUCTION The Gaudgaon project ................................. Reasons fot the designs .............................. Three different designs .............................. GENERALWIND ENERGYPRINCIPLtS ......................... Wind resources ....................................... Windmill design ...................................... 'Windmill economics ................................... DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE 240FT DIAMETER IRRIGATION WINDSIILL..................................... Materials ............................................ Windmill chassis and main shaft ...................... Windmill rotor ....................................... and punlp rods .......................... Pump, levers, ........................... V. VILLAGE FABRICATION TECHNIQUE ..F ........... ................................. Safety Cold forging ......................................... Hot forging .......................................... Carpentry ............................................ Sewing ............................................... Masonry .............................................. Welding .............................................. ............................................. Drilling Threading ............................................ VI. CHECKLIST FOR CONSTRUCTION A 240FT DIAMETER OF VfLLAGE-BUILT WINDMILL.................................. Tools ................................................ Check the windmill design ............................ Purchase materials ................................... Construction steps ................................... VII.Tower ................................................ 1 3

3

III.

11 17 21 25 25 25 29 31 35 35

l!

IV.

27

El40 40 40 40 42 42 43 43 43 44 44

51 INSTALLING THE WINDMILL. . . . . . . ..a...................... 51 Transporting the windmill . . . . . . . . ..*................. 52 Erectinq the windmill tower a~aeID~w~~,~*~~~~**~o**~~ Placing the tower foundations........................ 53 Installing the windmill chassis, main shaft, 53 and tail arm . . . . . . . . ..*......................*..... Installing the windmill rotor . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Installing the connecting rods and pucnp rod.......... 58

iii

Installing the pump.................................. Checking the windmill machinery ...................... Installing the counterweight ......................... VIII. OPERATINGAND MAINTAINING THE WINDMILL................ Safety in operation of the windmill ................... Starting the windmill ................................ Stopping the windmill in a normal wind ............... Stopping the windmill in a strong wind ............... Windmill maintenance ................................. Pump maintenance .....................................

2 61 63 63 63 65 65 66 66 67 67 68 6868

IX. USING THE WINDMILL FOR IRRIGATION ....................... Storage tank ......................................... Pipeline ............................................. Auxiliary power sources .............................. Intermittent irrigation .............................. .................................. Borewell irrigation APPENDIX I .................................................. Differtilt types of windmills ......................... APPENDIX II ................................................. Hooks and magazines about wind power ................. APPENDIX III ................................................ Materials list-240foot windmill APPENDIX IV ................................................. Construction drawings--240foot ..................... windmill ..............

68 ;: 73 73 77 77 79 79

iv

I. ABOUT THIS HANDBOOKThe windmill fabrication techniques decribed in this handbook Solapur, are the result of my stays in Gaudgaon Village, in 1936-77 and 1980-81. The handbook is Maharashtra, India, guide for people in parts of India or meant to be a practical arid areas who may wish to build windmills of the other windy, type now being demonstrated at Gaudgaon. Although it gives many this Handbook cannot describe everything that has been details, done at Gaudgaon. In particular, anyone wishing to build a windmill of this type should purchase the blueprint drawings of the machinery, or, even better, attend, the three month windmill offered by Shri' Ehivaji fabrication training course the Barsi, Shikshan Prasarak Mandal, Gaudgaon Taluka District 413 404 India. Solapur, Maharashtra, many people and organizations have helped with this work, and I wish tc thank particularly the Godbole family, who took care of me while I was in Solapur; Mr. J. G. Lohokare of Gaudhelped us through goon, whose determined support of the project many discouraging days; Nana and Prabakhar Gavali of Subashchhandra Mechanical Works in Solapur, who donated use of their facilities; Oxfam-Nagpur, under whose grants a major portion of the work was undertaken; VITA's Renewable Energy Program, which supported both my work in India and publication of this handbook; Marcus Sherman, VITA's field representative in Asia, and the VITA staff in the United States, who provided important support; Bread for the World in Stuttgart, West Germany, who also supported part of the work; VITA Volunteer artists William drawings and blueGensel and Bruce Towl, for the excellent prints: Chhagan Sutar, Nishicant Sutar, Naga Lohar, and Oudow fabrication methods; and my Kazale, who taught me village father, who taught me to work with my hands. Any mistakes or omissions in this handbook are my responsibility, and I will be grateful to receive suggestions for revisions. For those who work and think with metric measurements, my apologies.Many,

Several things cannot be overemphasized. First, the windmills described here are undergoing testing and many of their features are not yet proven over time. It is almost certain that their designs will be changed in coming years. In fact, as long as people build windmills with their own hands for their own use, windmill design will continue to evolve. Second, there can be no substitute for careful planning and Careful attention to detail when building these windmills. village craftsmanship can produce a windmill that is strong and that runs well. Sloppy work and careless planning generally1

will create a machine farmer's money.

that

breaks

down quickly

and wastes

a

these windmills can be dangerous at Third and most important, many times during their fabrication and operation. The chief dangers come from the power of the swung sledgehammer, the and the power of the wind height of the tower above a well, A windmill fabrication crew that works during a strong storm. together carefully and with comradeship will keep accidents to and operators must always remember a minimum. Windmill builders that their safety lies in their own hands as they work. Many people have asked me why I have chosen to spend several years of my life working on this project as a volunteer in a I am land far from my home. To answer this question briefly, frightened to live in a world where nuclear power plants have bringing with them the ability to spread to many countries, of atomic war now manufacture atomic bombs. The possibility threatens the lives of all humans. It is my personal belief that we will never have world peace until we shun atomic technology in all of its forms, and take apart all the thousands of atomic warheads that have mistakenly been built. The vast sums of mcney spent on military preparations, particularly by the superpowers, must be used instead to provide food, water, and other basic human needs. As a recent United Nations report concluded, "the world can either continue to pursue the arms race --or move consciously and with deliberate speed toward a more sustainable international economic and political order. It cannot do both." People around the world must be aware of and vocal about these issues. However, I also believe that we must not ments to change their policies. If we can our own hands, displacing a small amount electricity, then it is worth doing. In find that we gain some independence and lives. In peace, William W. Smith, III P. 0. Box 281, Jamestown, Rhode Island August 1982 02835 USA wait for our governbuild a windmill with of nuclear-generated the process, we may control over