2018 Dickinson Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report ... Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Gross, Net and 2020...

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Transcript of 2018 Dickinson Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report ... Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Gross, Net and 2020...

  • Dickinson College Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    2008 - 2018

    October 22, 2019

  • Dickinson College Greenhouse Gas Inventory, 2008 – 2018. Prepared by the Center for Sustainability Education, Dickinson College.

    Acknowledgements Numerous people assisted with data collection, data analysis and preparation of the Greenhouse Gas Inventory report and are thanked for their help. They include Ken Ball, Kristine Barrick, Kristen Chirillo, Jeff Forester, Amanda George, Tina Gutshall, Mary Hair, Angie Harris, Stephanie Hostetler, Michael Kiner, Neil Leary, Lindsey Lyons, Cheryl Lusk, Cody Rosenbarker, Mark Scott, Ken Shultes, Leslie Shwartz, Lori Sinkovitz, Margaret Stafford, Chuck Steel, Matt Steiman, Michelle Spicer, and Sean Witte.

  • Table of Contents 1 Introduction and Summary ...................................................................................................... 1 2 Measuring Greenhouse Gases ................................................................................................. 3 3 Sources of Greenhouse Gas Emissions ................................................................................... 4

    3.1 Emissions by Scope ......................................................................................................... 4 3.2 Emissions by Activity ...................................................................................................... 5

    4 Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emitting Activities .................................................................... 7 4.1 Heat and Power ................................................................................................................ 7 4.2 Transportation .................................................................................................................. 8 4.3 Other Activities ............................................................................................................. 10

    5 Carbon Offsets ....................................................................................................................... 11 6 Drivers of Emission Changes ................................................................................................ 12

    6.1 Population, Building Space and Weather ...................................................................... 12 6.2 Energy Efficiency .......................................................................................................... 13 6.3 Carbon Intensity ............................................................................................................ 14

    7 Reaching Our 2020 Target .................................................................................................... 15 Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................... 17 Glossary ......................................................................................................................................... 17 Data Appendix ............................................................................................................................... 20

    Table A-1. Emission Factors, 2018 ........................................................................................... 20 Table A-2. Global Warming Potentials ..................................................................................... 20 Table A-3. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Scope, 2008 – 2018 ............................................... 21 Table A-4. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Activity, 2008 – 2018 ............................................ 22 Table A-5. Heat and Power Activity and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, 2008 – 2017 ................ 23 Table A-6. Transportation Activity and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, 2008 – 2018 .................. 24 Table A-7. Other Activities and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, 2008 – 2018 .............................. 25

  • 1

    1 Introduction and Summary As Dickinson College approaches the year 2020 it approaches a deadline: reduce gross emissions of greenhouse gases 25 percent below their 2008 level and offset remaining emissions to reach zero net emissions and become carbon neutral. Dickinson committed to the carbon neutrality goal when in 2007 it joined with 19 other institutions as Charter Signatories of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. The Carbon Commitment, as it is now called, has been signed by over 600 colleges and universities. Signatories commit to integrate teaching about climate change and sustainability into their educational programs; measure and report their emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs); adopt and implement a plan to reduce emissions; and reach zero net emissions by a date of their choosing. Dickinson produced its first GHG inventory in 2008 and adopted its Climate Action Plan in 2009. The plan set ambitious targets for carbon neutrality and emission reductions for 2020, 2025 and 2030 (Table 1). This report presents an inventory of Dickinson’s greenhouse gas emissions for the period 2008 through 2018 and documents progress toward the college’s Carbon Commitment targets.1 Table 1. Climate Action Plan Targets

    2008

    Baseline

    2018

    2020

    Target

    2025

    Target

    2030

    Target Gross Emissions (MTCO2E) 18,847 16,855 14,136 9,424 4,712 Percentage change from 2008 - -10.6% -25% -50% -75% Renewable Energy Credits & Carbon Offsets (MTCO2E)

    -3,965 -6,539 -14,136 -9,424 -4,712

    Net Emissions (MTCO2E) 14,893 10,316 0 0 0 Greenhouse gases are pollutants that change the Earth’s climate by accumulating in the atmosphere where they absorb thermal radiation and warm the planet. Greenhouse gases emitted by Dickinson include carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and a variety of fluorinated gases. The gases are emitted through activities that include heating, cooling, lighting and powering the campus with fossil fuels and purchased electricity; students and employees traveling by air, train, bus, taxi and personal vehicles; refrigerants leaking from Dickinson owned cooling equipment; applying fertilizers on campus grounds and the Dickinson Farm; raising livestock at the Dickinson Farm; landfilling Dickinson’s solid waste; and treating Dickinson’s wastewater. Gross GHG emissions declined from the 2008 baseline level of 18,847 MTCO2E to 16,855 MTCO2E in 2018, a reduction of nearly 2,000 MTCO2E or 10.6 percent (Figure 1).2 Purchases of Renewable Energy Credits and composting of food waste at the Dickinson Farm offset a portion of the college’s gross emissions and reduce net emissions of GHGs. Net emissions (gross emissions minus renewable energy credits and offsets) decreased from 14,893 MTCO2E in 2008 to 10,316 MTCO2E in 2018, a decline of 30.7 percent.

    1 Years refer to Dickinson’s fiscal years, which begin July 1 and end June 30. 2 Emissions of greenhouse gases are reported in units of metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, or MTCO2E. The method for converting quantities of different gases into an equivalent amount of carbon dioxide is described in section 2 of this report.

  • 2

    The decrease in emissions occurred despite a 13.7 percent increase in Dickinson’s gross square feet of building space and a 1.9 percent increase in Dickinson’s population of students and employees over the 2008 – 2018 period. Countervailing the effects of these factors on GHG emissions are Climate Action Plan projects that increased energy efficiency, as reflected in a 9.8 percent decrease in energy use per square foot of building space; shifts in electricity generation in Dickinson’s market region that reduced carbon dioxide emissions per kilowatt hour (kWh) of electricity by 21.6 percent; and improved efficiencies in commercial air travel that reduced emissions per passenger mile by 16.1 percent. Figure 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Gross, Net and 2020 Target, 2008 - 2018

    Meeting the 2020 target will require further reductions in gross emissions of roughly 2,700 MTCO2E and purchases of slightly more than 14,000 MTCO2E of carbon offsets. Climate Action Plan projects implemented since 2018 and planned purchases of carbon offsets, the effects of which are not reflected in this report, are anticipated to yield more than sufficient reductions in GHG emissions to reach the 2020 target. Section 2 of the report describes the methodology for measuring Dickinson’s GHG emissions. Section 3 provides information about the sources of emissions disaggregated by category and by activity. Section 4 of the report presents detailed information about the emission-generating activities and Section 5 describes Dickinson’s Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets. Section 6 examines the drivers or factors that have contributed to changes in Dickinson’s emissions over the period 2008 through 2018. Section 7 concludes the report with descriptions of recent Climate Action Plan projects that are expected to close the gap and get Dickinson to carbon neutrality by 2020.

    18,847

    17,261

    16,304 16,945

    15,479

    16,817 17,336 17,300

    16,775 16,583 16,855

    14,893

    13,733

    8,543 8,816 8,480

    9,745

    10,476 10,739

    11,759

    9,513

    10,316

    0.0

    2,000.0

    4,000.0

    6,000.0

    8,000.0

    10,000.0

    12,000.0

    14,000.0

    16,000.0

    18,000.0

    20,000.0

    2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018