2003 CE HOF Booklet

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2003 CE HOF Booklet

Transcript of 2003 CE HOF Booklet

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    ow in its fourth year, the CE Hall of Fame honors themovers and shakers that have made the consumer electron-ics industry what it is today. Determination, resolve, cre-

    ativity and vision are among the attributes that the inductees to theCE Hall of Fame possess. The program serves as a bridge from thepast to the present, enabling younger generations to build on thefoundation laid by their colleagues before them. The CE Hall of Famepays tribute to those who individually, and in some cases together,made significant contributions to the development of consumer electronics products.

    To recognize the accomplishments of the leaders of the consumerelectronics industry, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)announced the first 50 inductees into its CE Hall of Fame at the2000 International CES in Las Vegas, seven more at the 2001 CESand another ten at the 2002 CES. This year, CEA proudly announcesan additional nine select leaders will join the existing 67 members.

    The 2003 class will stand on the shoulders of such industry giants asEdwin Armstrong, Bill Boss, Paul Galvin, Ray Gates, Dr. SidneyHarman, Henry Kloss and David Sarnoff. The CE Hall of Fame showcases the resolve and progressive thinking of those whose ideashave directly affected consumer electronics technology and areresponsible for enhancing consumers lifestyles. Future leaders willundoubtedly build on these ideas and produce an even greater proliferation of consumer electronics products.

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  • BBUUIILLDDIINNGG TTHHEE IINNDDUUSSTTRRYYDuring the past century, the consumer electronics industry hasevolved from isolated hobbyist creations to a wide range of digitaltechnologies that has spurred numerous innovative devices. CEA represents more than 1,000 corporate members involved in thedesign, development, manufacturing, distribution and integration ofaudio, video, mobile electronics, wireless and landline communica-tions, information technology, home networking, multimedia andaccessory products.

    Although the U.S. economy is facing challenges, the consumer technology industry is a bright spot with sales expected to brush $100billion for 2003 a 3.5 percent rise over 2002. It is amazing what aprofound impact an idea can have once it is unleashed on the world.Just think of the Internet and how our world has forever changed.With this in mind, we can only guess at the extraordinary innovationthat will occur as the leaders of the CE Hall of Fame of tomorrow arebusy creating technologies and products in labs and companies today.

    To choose the 2003 class, CEA asked a panel of 17 media and industry professionals to perform the difficult task of judging thenominations that were submitted by manufacturers, retailers andindustry journalists. The judging took place on September 10, 2002in New York. The judges used the democratic process of the majorityvotes to determine the nine honorees. For a complete list of thejudges, see page xx.

    PPAARRTTIICCIIPPAATTEE IINN TTHHEE HHAALLLL OOFF FFAAMMEEYou can play a role in the Hall of Fame program for 2004 by nominating the individual you believe has contributed most significantly to consumer electronics, as we know it today. Visitwww.CE.org for a nomination form or see your July/August issue ofConsumer Electronics Vision magazine. Final selections will be tabulated and again judged by a panel made up of CEA members,media and other industry professionals.

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  • Abrams, Benjamin

    Adler, Robert

    Armstrong, Edwin

    Baird, John Logie

    Balderston, Wil l iam

    Bardeen, John

    Bel l , Alexander Graham

    Blay, Andre

    Brat ta in , Walter

    Braun, Kar l Ferdinand

    Bushnel l , Nolan

    Cros ley J r. , Powel

    DeForest , Lee

    Dolby, Ray

    DuMont, Al len

    Edison, Thomas

    Ei lers , Car l

    Farnsworth, Phi lo T.

    Fessenden, Reginald Aubrey

    Fisher, Avery

    Freimann, Frank

    Galv in, Paul

    Ginsberg , Char les

    Goldmark, Peter

    Harman, Dr. S idney

    Hertz , Heinr ich

    Ibuka, Masaru

    Johnson, Eldr idge

    Ki lby, Jack

    Kloss , Henry

    Koss Sr. , JohnLachenbruch, David

    Lansing, James B.

    Marantz , Saul

    Marconi , Gugl ie lmo

    Matsushi ta , Konosuke

    McDonald J r. , Cmdr.Eugene

    Mori ta , Akio

    Noyce, Robert

    Poniatof f , Alexander M.

    Roberts , Ed

    Sarnoff , David

    Scott , Hermon Hosmer

    Shira ishi , Yuma

    Shockley, Wil l iam

    Siragusa Sr. , Ross

    Takano, Shizuo

    Tesla , Nikola

    Wayman, Jack

    Zworykin, Vladimir

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    22 00 00 11 II NN DD UU CC TT EE EE SSBerl iner, Emil

    Fleming, S i r John Ambrose

    Gernsback, Hugo

    Jensen, Peter Laur i ts

    Muntz , Ear l

    Poulsen, Valdemar

    West inghouse, George

    22 00 00 22 II NN DD UU CC TT EE EE SS Alexanderson,Ernst F.W.

    Appel , Bernard

    Baker, W.G.B.

    Boss , Wil l iam E.

    Ekstract , Richard

    Fisher, Walter

    Gates , Raymond

    Lear, Wil l iam Powel l

    Polk , Sol

    Sauter, Jack K.

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    egarded as a founder of the electronics accessory industry,Herbert Borchardt created the systems that enabled dealers toexpand their business offerings and profits with accessory

    products. Some of his first accessory products included 78-rpm phono-graph replacement needles, record covers, cleaning materials and otherphono accessories. At Recoton, he helped develop new innovative elec-tronic accessories for 45 rpm records, eight track cartridges, audio videodevices, telephones, antennas, audio cassettes, CB radios, television, cellphones, DVDs and videogames. He also planned accessories for emergingtechnologies such as digital HDTV. Borchardt was born in Germany andbegan his career there, working at Brunswick Records. He later foundedPolydor Records in Paris in 1929, and then Bost Records when he arrivedin New York in 1941. After this, Borchardt began his involvement withRecoton.

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    nown as an industry consultant, lecturer and technicalwriter, Leonard Feldman contributed to the consumer elec-tronics industry in a variety of ways. As the senior editor of

    Audio magazine, Feldman wrote reviews that made insightful comparisonsof competing consumer electronics equipment through Feldman Labs. Healso was a columnist for EQ magazine and covered various audio andelectronic issues in other industry publications such as PopularElectronic, Popular Science, Consumer Electronics Magazine andTWICE, as well as several newspapers. Feldman authored seven bookscovering industry topics. Feldman was involved in the Audio EngineeringSociety (AES) as the vice president of the eastern region.

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    or more than 25 years, Kees Schouhammer Immink playeda central role in research and development of mass datastorage products. He was affiliated with Philips Research

    Labs, Eindoven, Netherlands from 1967 to 1998. His research resulted in50 U.S.-issued patents, five of those basic patents have played a key rolein the optical recorder industry since 1985 and will continue until at least2015. Currently, Immink is an adjunct professor at the Institute forExperimental Mathematics in Essen, Germany, and a visiting professor atthe University of Singapore. Immink joined the Philips research group in1971 and participated in the worlds first experiments with opticalvideodisc recording. In 1979, as a technical leader, Immink participatedin the negotiations between Sony and Philips for the worldwide-acceptedstandard for the compact disc (CD). Imminks coding system, namedEFM, now is used in most systems for digital video, audio and datarecording. More recently, Immink designed the channel coding tech-niques for the digital versatile disc (DVD) as well as the videodiscrecorder (VDR), which intends to bring an alternative to the camcorder.

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    ill Kasuga co-founded Kenwood Electronics Inc. in 1961 as adistribution company for Trio Corp., a Japanese consumerelectronics manufacturer, and gradually built Kenwood into a

    name synonymous with quality stereo systems. The company name waschanged to Kenwood U.S.A. Corp. in 1975. In 1993 Kasuga was namedchairman of the board for the company, which then had sales of morethan $500 million and more than 300 employees. Kasuga stepped downas chairman in 1995, but continued with Kenwood as a member of theexecutive committee and the 401k Trustees Board. Today he serves as anadvisor to Kenwoods president. Kasuga graduated from the University ofSan Francisco, served in the U.S. Army for 16 years and worked for A&ATrading Corp., an importing affiliate of RadioShack, before foundingKenwood. He is also a CEA Lifetime Achievement Award winner.

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    resident and founder of the Atwater Kent Radio Co., AtwaterKent manufactured the open s