17 OCTOBER 2018- 25 FEBRUARY 2019 CUBISM ... Gradually, Picasso returns to the portrait. In April,...

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Transcript of 17 OCTOBER 2018- 25 FEBRUARY 2019 CUBISM ... Gradually, Picasso returns to the portrait. In April,...

  • CUBISM

    #ExpoCubisme

    COMMUNICATION AND PARTNERSHIPS DEPARTMENT

    PRESS KIT

    CUBISM 17 OCTOBER 2018- 25 FEBRUARY 2019

  • CUBISM 17 OCTOBER 2018- 25 FEBRUARY 2019 GALLERY 1, LEVEL 6

    CONTENTS

    1. PRESS RELEASE PAGE 3

    2. CHRONOLOGY PAGE 5

    3. EXHIBITION MAP PAGE 9

    4. EXHIBITION CIRCUIT PAGE 10

    5. THE LENDERS PAGE 17

    6. PUBLICATIONS PAGE 18

    7. PRESS VISUALS PAGE 19

    8. THE SPONSORS PAGE 30

    9. LIST OF EXHIBITED WORKS PAGE 34

    10. PRACTICAL INFORMATION PAGE 44

    communication and partnerships department 75191 Paris cedex 04

    Director Benoît Parayre telephone 00 33 (0)1 44 78 12 87 email benoit.parayre@centrepompidou.fr

    Press officer Élodie Vincent telephone 00 33 (0)1 44 78 48 56 email elodie.vincent@centrepompidou.fr

    www.centrepompidou.fr

    September 2018

    #ExpoCubisme

  • PRESS RELEASE CUBISM 17 OCTOBER 2018 - 25 FEBRUARY 2019 GALLERY 1, LEVEL 6

    The Centre Pompidou takes a fresh look at one of modern art history's founding movements, Cubism (1907-1917), through a comprehensive overview. The first exhibition devoted to Cubism in France since 1953, the project's originality lies in its

    unusual stance, broadening a standpoint usually focused on its two inventors, Georges Braque

    and Pablo Picasso, to other artists. These pioneers, soon followed by Fernand Léger and Juan

    Gris, reserved their ground-breaking experimental work for a small-scale gallery run by a young

    unknown dealer, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, while artists like Albert Gleizes, Jean Metzinger,

    Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, Robert and Sonia Delaunay brought the movement to the

    attention of critics and the public through their contributions to the Paris Salons. The exhibition

    highlights the rich inventiveness and wide variety of the movement. Not only did it introduce a

    geometric approach to forms and challenge classical representation, but its radical explorations

    and the creative drive of its members also paved the way to modern art.

    Containing 300 works and documents illustrating the influence of Cubism, the exhibition is

    presented chronologically in fourteen sections. Various masterpieces stand out, like Picasso's

    Portrait de Gertrude Stein (1906), Ambroise Vollard (1909) and Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (1910) as

    well as groups of paintings and sculptures never yet seen together. The exhibition circuit

    highlights Cubism's momentous, multi-faceted development, going back to its primitivist

    sources and the Cubists' fascination with Gauguin and Cézanne. It also reflects the movement's

    formal journey from its initial Cézannian period – illustrated here by Picasso's extraordinary still

    life Pains et compotier sur une table (1909) – to a hermetic, analytical stage (1910-1912), before

    evolving towards a more synthetic version (1913-1917) with a return to representation and

    colour.

    communication and partnerships department

    75191 Paris cedex 04

    director Benoît Parayre + 33 1 44 78 12 87 benoit.parayre@centrepompidou.fr

    head of press departement Elodie Vincent + 33 1 44 78 48 56 elodie.vincent@centrepompidou.fr

    centrepompidou.fr

    #ExpoCubisme

    Juan Gris

    Le petit déjeuner, october 1915

    Collection Centre Pompidou, Paris

    © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist.

    RMN-Grand Palais / Philippe Migeat

    September 2018

    With the support of

    Grand mécène Partenaire d'honneur

    Grand mécène

    Grand mécène

    Avec le soutien exceptionnel du Musée national Picasso-Paris

  • 4

    Thanks to outstanding loans from the Basel Kunstmuseum, the Musée National Picasso and the New

    York Museum of Modern Art, Cubism's most revolutionary side – the glued papers, collages and

    constructions invented by Braque, Picasso, Gris and Henri Laurens –, is magnificently represented by

    major icons of 20th century art, like Picasso's Nature morte à la chaise cannée (1912) and his Guitare en

    tôle et fils de fer (1914). Other aspects illustrate the considerable standing of the Cubist galaxy. Its

    links with the literary milieu are explored in a room dedicated to critics and poets, embodied in

    striking portraits of Max Jacob and Apollinaire by Le Douanier Rousseau and Marie Laurencin, the

    Kahnweiler publications of Cubist books and the collaboration between the Delaunays and Blaise

    Cendrars on La Prose du Transsibérien en 1913.

    The tragedy of the Great War (1914-1918), which mobilised or exiled artists and their supporters, is

    retraced through the works of artists who fought at the front (Raymond Duchamp–Villon, Fernand

    Léger) or remained behind the lines, as they were foreigners (Pablo Picasso, Cartes à jouer, verres,

    bouteille de rhum,"Vive la France", 1914-1915). These works bear witness to the inevitable sterilisation

    of a movement arrested by history. The latter part of the exhibition shows both the rebirth of survivors

    like Georges Braque (La Musicienne, 1917-1918) and Cubism's impact on contemporary artists (Henri

    Matisse), its heirs in abstract art (Piet Mondrian, Kasimir Malevich) and anti-establishment figures

    (Marcel Duchamp), who all paid tribute to the Cubist revolution.

    Through a circuit providing clarity for audiences on the key concepts, tools and procedures that gave Cubism such unity, the exhibition sheds light on the experimental, collective nature of this movement, whose revolutionary aesthetic was simultaneously the wellspring of modernism and its very language.

    Curators:

    Brigitte Leal Deputy director, musée national d'art moderne, Paris

    Christian Briend Head of the modern collection department, musée national d'art moderne, Paris

    Ariane Coulondre Curator of the modern collection, musée national d'art moderne, Paris

    The exhibition is organized in partnership with Kunstmuseum, Basel. The exhibition will be shown at the Kunstmuseum, Basel, from March 31 to August 5, 2019.

    THE EXHIBITION

    TUESDAY 16 OCTOBER / 11 AM – 1 PM

    PRESS OPENING

    In media partnership with

  • 5

    1907 Arriving in Paris, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler opens his first gallery at 28 rue Vignon.

    That spring, in his Bateau-Lavoir studio, Pablo Picasso begins to draw studies for Les Demoiselles

    d’Avignon. In November, Georges Braque discovers this painting, a revolution in modern art, in which

    Iberian and African influences combine.

    Over the summer, Braque and Othon Friesz go to La Ciotat, then make a stay in L'Estaque.

    In October, posthumous retrospective of Cézanne at the Salon d’Automne and publication of his

    correspondence with Émile Bernard.

    1908 At the Salon des Indépendants (March 20-May 2), Guillaume Apollinaire notices the originality of Braque’s

    work and praises “his will to construct.”

    In spring, Braque works on his Grand nu. Over the summer, he goes to L'Estaque and there paints

    landscapes and still lifes inspired by Cézanne.

    Picasso spends August in the Oise with Fernande Olivier and paints landscapes whose tonalities and

    structure are similar to those of Braque.

    The jury of the Salon d’Automne rejects six paintings by Braque. In November, Kahnweiler invites Braque

    to present 27 of his recent paintings in his gallery. Apollinaire writes the preface for the catalogue. The art

    critic Louis Vauxcelles writes in Gil Blas: “Mr. Braque […] scorns form, reduces everything, sites and

    figures and houses, to geometric patterns, to cubes…”

    The Russian collector Sergei Shchukin buys two recent paintings from Picasso.

    1909 American collectors Leo and Gertrude Stein purchase Picasso’s Trois Femmes (1908).

    Fernand Léger moves into La Ruche, where he meets Alexandre Archipenko, Jacques Lipchitz, and Soutine,

    as well as the poets and writers Apollinaire, Max Jacob, Pierre Reverdy, Maurice Raynal, and Blaise

    Cendrars.

    At the Salon des Indépendants, Louis Vauxcelles describes the works of Raoul Dufy, Friesz, Maurice

    Vlaminck, André Derain, and Braque as “cubic bizarreries.”

    Over the summer, at La Roche-Guyon, Braque paints increasingly geometric compositions and reduces his

    palette to greens, grays, and ochres.

    Picasso stays at Horta de Ebro, where he paints landscapes and geometrized portraits of Fernande Olivier.

    On his return, he sculpts the portrait of his companion, Tête de Femme (Fernande), the first Cubist sculpture.

    1910 Henri Laurens stays at La Ruche.

    Braque’s and Picasso’s compositions present a multiplicity of increasingly broken-up planes and forms.

    Robert Delaunay begins his first paintings on the theme of the city in a range of grays. He meets Léger.

    Over the summer, Picasso visits Florence, then settles in Cadaqués. Braque's last stay in L'Estaque,

    where he paints the two Usines du Rio-Tinto paintings.

    In December, Ambroise Vollard presents a group of Picasso’s works produced between 1900 and 1910.

    2. CHRONOLOGY

  • 6 CHRONOLOGYCUBISM

    6

    1911 The Puteaux Group forms around th