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  • NSTITUTE OF

    COGNITIVE '"i" .S CIENCE

    . How an Unfamiliar Thing Should Be Called

    Patricia BagettDepartment of Psychology

    Andrzej EhrenfeuchtDepartment of Computer Science ^ ELECTE

    University of Colorado DEC 3 11981

    B.

    Technical Report No. 111-ONR This research was sponsorea bythe Personnel and Training

    Institute of Cognitive Science Research Programs, PsychologicalUniversity of Colorado Science Division, Office ofBoulder, Colorado 80309 Naval Research, under contract

    No. N00014.78-C-0433, ContractAuthority Identification Number

    November, 1981 NR 157-422

    >..

    I., Approved for public release; distribution unlimited.Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for any

    Mpurpose of the United States Government.

    8112 31117

    A....

  • SECUr|TY CLASSIFIC.ATION OF rHit "h'. t 1Wi,.. flnta e.tetrit) ~~~~~~~~RE D EOTDCMNAINPG F INSTRUCTioNSSREPORT DOCUMENTATIO1N PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM.

    SREPORT hUIDE- 2. GOVT ACEFSSION NO. 3, PECI!-V'''T- CATALOG NUMBER

    F- 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 4LL TYFE OF h1PC.T & PERIOD COVEREDHow An Unfamiliar Thing Should Be Called Technical Report

    6- PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

    7. AUTHOR(a) 6. CON1RACT OR GRANT NUMBER(*)':- N00014- 78-C-0433

    Patricia Baggett and Andrzej Ehrenfeucht

    9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS I,. PPC'GR~W F'-LEMCMT, PROJECT, TASYAPUA A% WORKI UNIT NUMBERS

    Institute of Cognitive Science N R 157-422S....i;_.__:_NR 157-422University of ColoradoBoulder, Colorado 80309

    II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE

    Personnel & Training Research Programs November, 1981Office of Naval Research (Code 458) 1. NUMBER OF PAGESArlington, VA 22217

    "T-4 MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(if dilferent from Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of this report)

    UnclassifiedV IS.. DECL ASSi FICATION/DOWNGRADING

    SCHEDULE

    16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of this Report)

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited.

    17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abatract entered in Block 20. if different from Report)

    IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES

    19. KEY WORDS (Continu, on tevorse aide If ne,,,,ary and identify by block number)

    Naming, Naming Schema, Categorization, Classification of Unfamiliar Items,Recognition, Recall.

    2ZABSTRACT (Continue on reverae aide It necessary and Identify by block numn bfr)

    An empirical method is described to derive good names for unfamiliar objects.

    Three principles were used in deriving the names: (1) The vocabulary andstructure of the names should be within the user's linguistic capacities;(2) The names should be informationally efficient, namely, short, but atthe same time unique; and (3) The names should form a classification system.

    K For example, most names have a generic term and one or more modifiers.;L''-- FORM

    DD I JAN 11 1473 EDITION OP I NOV 65 IS OBSOL..ETC /2, /'SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS P (Hften Data f ,aia d)

    ....... .. .~d f

  • SRCUnrT.Y CL ASSIFICATION OF THItS PAOQ.(WheII Date Knto.d.)

    ,7hese three principles lead to the following design for creating good names:Step 1: Names are generated by a group of subjects. Step 2: From the namesgenerated by subjects, the experimenter chooses a subset of the names accordingto the following criteria: (a) the modal name is chosen, namely, if a

    -particular name is generated more often than others, it is chosen; (b) shorternames are preferred; (c) names chosen stay within the classification systemprovided by the subjects. Step 3 How good the names are is tested bymeasuring (1) how well people can match the names with the objects theydescribe; and (2) how well they can recall the namesi, given the physical objectSteps 2 and 3 can be iterated; namely, if a given name is poorly matched orrecalled, it can be repliced by another generated name and tested again.The method results in names that form a classification system and that are[ ::. natural, short, well matched with their whysical refererts and well recalled.The method is generalizable and ought to be useful in a large variety ofsituatio-is where names for unfamiliar objects are needed.

    P

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  • How An Unfamiliar Thing Should Be Called

    Patricia Baggett, Institute of Cognitive Science

    and

    Andrzej Ehrenfeucht, Department of Computer Science

    University of Colorado

    A

    Institute of Cognitive ScienceTechnical Report #111-ONRNovember, 1981

    nH

    .... I

    "'i ii

    rj

    II

  • How. An Unfamiliar Thing Should Be Called

    An empirical method is described in this paper to derive good names forIunfamiliar objects. How good the names are is measured by (1) how wellI people]

    can match the names with the objects they describe; and (2) how well they can

    recall the names.L

    Previous researchers (e.g., Brown (1958), Carroll (1980, 1981), Nelson (1974,

    1977)) have investigated naming, including why some names are good and others poor,

    but the empirical method given here for eeriving good names, and for measuring howgood they are, has not been presented before. The method is generalizable and has

    already been successfully used in other situations (e.g., Norman, personal commiunica-

    tion) where names for unfamiliar objects are needed.

    The stimulus materials to be named were pieces from an assembly kit for the

    construction of objects, but the method of deriving names is not restricted to thesematerials. The three principles used in deriving the names are: (1) the vocabulary

    J and structure of the names should be within the users' linguistic capacities; (2) the

    names should be informationally efficiint, namely, short, but at the same time unique;

    and (3) the names should form a classification system. ihat is, a name should contain

    a generic term and, when necessary, one or more modifiers. (As will be seen later,

    the generic terms are nouns and the modifiers are adjectives and prepositional phrases.)

    The three principles above lead to the following design for creating good names:

    Step 1: Names are generated by a group of subjects.

    Stp2 From the names generated by subjects, the experimenter chooses a subset of

    the names according to the following criteria: (1) the modal name is chosen, namely

    if a particular name is generated more often than others, it is chosen; (b) shorter

    * jnames are preferred; and (c) the names chosen stay within the classification systemprovided by the subjects.

  • -2-

    Step 3: How good the names are is tested by measuring, first, how well people can

    match the names with the objects they describe, and second, how well they can recall -the names, given the physical objects.

    Steps 2 and 3 can be iterated: If a given name is poorly matched or recalled,

    it can be replaced by another generated name and tested again.

    The method results in names that form a classification system arid that are

    natural, shor6, well matched with their physical referents, and well recalled. It

    ought to be useful in a large variety of.situations where names for unfamiliar objects

    are needed.

    Method

    Subjects A7

    114 students from introductory psychology classes at the University of Colorado

    participated as part of a course requirement, 14 in Part 1 and 100 in Part 2.

    Materials

    The items to be named were the 48 different pieces from an assembly kit,

    Fischertechnik 50. The kit, made in Germany, is similar to Lego. The manufacturers

    recommend its use by children as young as six through adults. Pieces are made of

    plastic or ,letal or rubber, colored red, grey, silver, and black. The largest piece22measures 90 x 45 mm (3.54 in x 1.77 in), and the smallest is 5 mmn (.2 in )

    Procedure

    The procedure is in two parts. In Part 1, subjects generate names for the

    pieces, and the modal name for each piece is formed. Part 2 includes an iterative

    technique of matching and recall of the modal names on iteration 1, followed by

    matching and recall of improved names on iterations 2 and 3. It also includes

    matching and recall of the names of the pieces given by the manufacturer.

    IL ~ _

  • Procedure for Part 1

    Subjects were run in groups of one to four until 14 had been tested. Each

    was shown the Fischertechnlk 50 kit, in an open box, packaged as it comes front the

    manufacturer and including 120 total and 48 different pieces, and actual models of

    a few constructions that could be made with the kit. Each subject was given a .-

    separate collection of the 48 different pieces in the kit. Subjects were instructed

    to name each piece. They were told that the goal of the research was to use the

    names generated by subjects to derive good names that could be used in assemblyinstructions. Each subject was given a sheet with 48 numbered blanks on which the

    names were to be written, and a folder containing 48 numbered color photos of the

    pieces. The name for the piece in photo one was to go in the first blank, etc.

    Subjects were encouraged tc ask if they were at all unsure which piece was pictured

    in a given photo. Subjects were allowed to slide or snap pieces together, to determine

    how they could potentially be used, and they could generate names for the pieces. in

    any order.

    Results of Part 1

    1]The names generated by subjects were analyzed' for geei terms or categories,

    * iand specific modifiers. For